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I am a bit new in threading in c# and on general, in my program I am using mutex to allow only 1 thread getting inside a critical section and for unknown reason with doing some cw prints I can see that more than 1 thread is getting inside my critical section and this is my code :

Mutex m = new Mutex();
m.WaitOne();
<C.S> // critical section here
m.ReleaseMutex();

I would very much like to know if I am doing a mistake here thanks in advance for your kind help.

EDIT:

My code include classes so it basically looks more like this:

public class test
{
    private mutex m;
    public test()
    {
         m = new mutex();
    }
    public func()
    {
         m.WaitOne();
         <C.S> // critical section here
         m.ReleaseMutex();
     }


    } 
share|improve this question
    
You must have more than one instance of the class. –  Will Dean Apr 22 '11 at 11:37
3  
That is an instance-level mutex; are you sure your coding isn't in the critical section on separate unrelated instances? Also, any error will render the code permanently locked - you need a try/finally for that to be safe. –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '11 at 11:38
1  
After the Edit: this Mutex works only at the object level, ie 1 CrticialSection / instance. Is that what you want? –  Henk Holterman Apr 22 '11 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The problem here is that all your callers are using a different mutex; you need the locking object to be shared, usually by making it a field. For example, and switching to a simpler lock metaphor:

private readonly object syncLock = new object();
public void ThreadSafeMethod() {
    lock(syncLock) {
        /* critical code */
    }
}

or using the mutex:

private readonly Mutex m = new Mutex();
public void ThreadSafeMethod() {
    m.WaitOne();
    try {
        /* critical code */
    } finally {
        m.ReleaseMutex();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
the mutex that i am using is a global mutex of a class so i think that it is the same mutex –  Nadav Stern Apr 22 '11 at 11:25
    
@Nadav - that is not what your question shows... your question shows it as the same location as code, i.e. a local variable. –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '11 at 11:27
    
Nadav - are you sure you don't have more than one instance of the class? Almost all 'lock/mutex is letting multiple calls through' problems turn out to be that there are more lock/mutex objects than you intended. –  Will Dean Apr 22 '11 at 11:28

It looks like you give each Thread its own Mutex. That won't work.

And a Mutex is overkill in most situations. You only need:

private static object syncLock = new object();  // just 1 instance

....

lock(syncLock)
{
    // critical section
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure from the question that we can infer static is intended... although we can't infer that it isn't either ;p –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '11 at 11:30
    
@Marc, correct. I used static as the opposite of what I think is the error. The code is not entirely clear. –  Henk Holterman Apr 22 '11 at 11:32

This pattern does no locking at all. Every thread creates a new Mutex object and immediately owns the lock for it. Other threads create and use a new Mutex itself.

Consider using a regular lock()!

lock(_lockobject) {
   // do inside what needs to be done - executed on a single thread only
} 

where _lockobject is a simple private variable in your class:

private object _lockobject; 

Edit: thanks to the commenters! Situations exist, where lock(this) can be dangerous. So I removed that.

share|improve this answer
2  
Do not lock(this), or lock(someType), or lock(anyString) - those are bad designs and are not robust. –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '11 at 11:28
1  
BTW, locking this is not allways good idea, better is create simple variable of type object toolazy.me.uk/… –  VikciaR Apr 22 '11 at 11:28
    
lock(this) is not considered to be good practice. (See, for example haacked.com/archive/2006/08/08/ThreadingNeverLockThisRedux.aspx). Much better to make an Object just for locking on, and forget that the .NET design error that lets any object be locked on was ever made. –  Will Dean Apr 22 '11 at 11:31
    
@WillDean - indeed; I'd rather that there was a specific type, for example Monitor instances. Also, object should be abstract ;p –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '11 at 11:32

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