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I have a question regarding libsvm predicting accuracy. I generated svm model file using easy.py. Now, when I am trying to predict the test vectors programatically in python, it shows wrongly predicted labels (all 1's) whereas, using easy.py I get an accuracy of 91%.

Each line of my test and train data is in the following format:

1 1:255 2:246 3:218 4:198 5:186 6:168 7:177 8:218 9:255 10:255 11:255 12:255 13:255 14:255 15:255 16:255 17:255 18:255 19:255 20:255 21:255 22:255 23:255 24:255 25:255 26:219 27:185 28:162 29:145 30:144 31:255 32:253 33:228 34:197

The code is as follows, am I doing anything wrong over here?

wimn_model = svm.svm_model("newtraindata.txt.model")
#load model
wimn_f_test=open('newtestdata.txt','r');
#load test data and train data
wimn_f_train=open('newtraindata.txt','r');

ii=0
for eachline in wimn_f_test:
        vec=eachline
        v=vec.split()
        vector={}
        ii=ii+1
        #print v[0]
        wimn_test_labels.append(int(v[0]))
        for i in range(1,len(v)):
                s=v[i].split(":")
                #print s[1]
                vector[i]=int(s[1])
        wimn_test_vectors.append(vector)
print "wimn test "+str(len(wimn_test_vectors))
# get the training and testing vectors and labels.
ii=0        
for eachline in wimn_f_train:
        vec=eachline
        v=vec.split()
        vector={}
        ii=ii+1
        wimn_train_labels.append(int(v[0]))
        #print v[0]
        for i in range(1,len(v)):
                s=v[i].split(":")
                #print s[1]
                vector[i]=int(s[1])
        wimn_train_vectors.append(vector)
print "wimn train "+str( len(wimn_train_vectors))

s=len(wimn_train_labels)
for i_s in range(0,s):
        #print i_s
        ww.append(wimn_model.predict(wimn_train_vectors[i_s]))

# wrongly predicted labels are in ww. correct labels are in wimn_train_labels, wimn_test_labels.
share|improve this question
    
Why do you give the data in a dict instead of list/tuple? Also, what is your libsvm version? – highBandWidth Apr 22 '11 at 15:38
1  
by default libsvm maximizes accuracy, (TP+TN)/ALL, which in a binary problem with majority of samples coming from one class results in labelling all data with one label. Maximize F-score (2*precision*recall)/(precision+recall), instead. – matcheek Apr 22 '11 at 15:57
    
I figured out the solution. For some reason libsvm (libsvm 3.0 is the version I use) predicts wrong class labels when I try to predict it with original test_data it predicts all as 1's. But, when I try to predict it with scaled test_data, it predicts the right values (as expected from output of executing easy.py ) @highbandwidth: I use libsvm 3.0 (though 3.1 is out there). I am reading the test vectors as a list of dicts with each dict representing a feature vector. I found some tutorial on the web using the same, so I did the same. – garak Apr 23 '11 at 18:04

One needs to load the scaled input values in order to get the predicted values. The problem got solved.

But there seems to be some dis-similarity between easy.py generated predicted labels and the ones when I load a model and predict the labels.

There is no proper documentation on libsvm on the web.

share|improve this answer
    
I used libsvm a number of times, and my experience is that you have to follow the guide, csie.ntu.edu.tw/~cjlin/papers/guide/guide.pdf before you start experimenting with it. I quickly realized that I don't want to use any wrappers and have called main routines directly from bash. You will need to change the cpp code if you want to use other evaluation metrics or run it in parallel anyway. I even wrote an email to prof. Chih-Jen Lin and got a response in under one hour. To sum up: follow the libsvm guide and try to call the c++ routines directly. – matcheek Apr 25 '11 at 7:41

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