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I want to terminate file that user selected from my program. I wrote this sample code:

var
  aFile: TFileStream;
Const
  FileAddr: String = 'H:\Akon.mp3';
  Buf: Byte = 0;
begin
  if FileExists(FileAddr) then
  begin
    // Open given file in file stream & rewrite it
    aFile:= TFileStream.Create(FileAddr, fmOpenReadWrite);
    try
      aFile.Seek(0, soFromBeginning);
      while aFile.Position <> aFile.Size do
        aFile.Write(Buf, 1);
    finally
      aFile.Free;
      ShowMessage('Finish');
    end;
  end;
end;

As you can see, I overwrite given file with 0 (null) value. This code works correctly, but the speed is very low in large files. I would like do this process in multithreaded code, but I tried some test some code and can't do it. For example, I create 4 threads that do this work to speed up this process.

Is there any way to speed up this process?

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1  
Multithreading cannot help. There is only one disk. Multi threading takes advantage of multiple processors. Write more than 1 byte at a time! Delete the file instead. Set the file end marker to the beginning of the file. Any of these could solve the problem. –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 15:23
1  
I'm assuming he specifically intends to erase all evidence of ever having had the Akon.mp3 file. :) But otherwise, yes - a simple delete would be best. –  Craig Young Apr 22 '11 at 15:54
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't know if it could help you, but I think you could do better (than multithreading) writing to file a larger buffer.
For example you could initialize a buffer 16k wide and write directly to FileStream; you have only to check the last part of file, for which you write only a part of the full buffer.
Believe me, it will be really faster...

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1  
what language is this meant to be? –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 15:24
    
@David Heffernan: is meant to be an example in delphi. It's not real code, it's clear!! It's just a suggest for using a larger buffer... If you think it's not good, I can delete it... –  Marco Apr 22 '11 at 15:26
    
it is good idea and resolve my problem , Thanks alot , now i like to know can i use TFileStream in multi thread or no ? Thanks . –  Felony Apr 22 '11 at 15:28
    
@Mojtaba Tajik: glad to help you :) –  Marco Apr 22 '11 at 15:30
    
@Mojtaba, I suggest you post a new question asking only about how to use files from multiple threads. This question was clearly about how to clear the file, regardless of how many threads would be used to do it. You latched on to one idea (multithreading), but then you conflated the original problem with your attempts at one solution. I've edited the question for you to make the original problem more prominent, so please post your multithreading questions separately. –  Rob Kennedy Apr 22 '11 at 16:21
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OK, I'll bite:

const
  FileAddr: String = 'H:\Akon.mp3';
var
  aFile: TFileStream;
  Buf: array[0..1023] of Byte;
  Remaining, NumBytes: Integer;
begin
  if FileExists(FileAddr) then
  begin
    // Open given file in file stream & rewrite it
    aFile:= TFileStream.Create(FileAddr, fmOpenReadWrite);
    try
      FillChar(Buf, SizeOf(Buf), 0);
      Remaining := aFile.Size;
      while Remaining > 0 do begin
        NumBytes := SizeOf(Buf);
        if NumBytes < Remaining then
          NumBytes := Remaining;      
        aFile.WriteBuffer(Buf, NumBytes);
        Dec(Remaining, NumBytes);
      end;
    finally
      aFile.Free;
      ShowMessage('Finish');
    end;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you this is much more to my taste. +1 –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 16:17
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Multiple threads won't help you here. Your constraint is disk access, primarily because you're writing only 1 byte at a time.

Declare Buf as an array of bytes, and initialise it with FillChar or ZeroMemory. Then change your while loop as follows:

while ((aFile.Position + SizeOf(Buf)) < aFile.Size) do
begin
  aFile.Write(Buf, SizeOf(Buf));
end;
if (aFile.Position < aFile.Size) then
begin
  aFile.Write(Buf, aFile.Size - aFile.Position);
end;
share|improve this answer
    
This is getting there but it's over complicated. There only needs to be a single call to Write. You just need to think out the loop a bit more. Consider using min(buffersize, bytesleft) idiom. I'd do it myself but I'm not at a computer! –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 15:32
    
Correct, it could be shortened to while (aFile.Position < aFile.Size) do aFile.Write(Buf, Min(SizeOf(Buf), (aFile.Size - aFile.Position));. But then it is perhaps less clear that/how the code deals with file sizes not exactly divisible by the buffer size. –  Craig Young Apr 22 '11 at 15:49
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You should learn from the slowness of the above code that:

  1. Writing one byte at a time is the slowest and worst way to do it, you incur a huge overhead, and reduce your overall performance.

  2. Even writing 1k bytes (1024 bytes) at a time, would be a vast improvement, but writing a larger amount will of course be even faster, until you reach a point of diminishing returns, which I would guess is going to be somewhere between 200k and 500k write buffer size. The only way to find out when it stops mattering for your application is to test, test, and test.

  3. Checking position against size so often is completely superfluous. If you read the size once, and write the correct number of bytes, using a local variable you will save yourself more overhead, and improve performance. ie, Inc(LPosition,BufSize) to increment LPosition:Integer logical variable, by the buffer size amount BufSize.

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Your returns diminish around 1k if I recall correctly. The operating system caches anyway so the overhead is the system call not disk access. –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 16:21
    
I doubt you'll see diminishing returns for anything less than the disk cluster size. (If I'm not mistaken this is currently 4k in most systems, though I have read of manufacturers moving to 64k.) Whether/how much leeway exists for multiples of this number is another story. –  Craig Young Apr 22 '11 at 18:21
    
I was thinking that beyond disk cluster size, you're going to get some benefit from large buffer transfers, due to the efficiency of writing 2k to a SATA disk, versus 4k, in a single transaction. But, as I said, the only way to know, is to test. –  Warren P Apr 23 '11 at 2:42
    
the OS cache hides all this as I said. The overhead is the system call not the disk access. –  David Heffernan Apr 23 '11 at 9:39
1  
That makes sense to me, however, what makes sense to me, and what happens, tends to diverge so often, that I always fall back to "test". :-) –  Warren P Apr 23 '11 at 15:11
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Not sure if this meets your requirments but it works and it's fast.

var
  aFile: TFileStream;
const
  FileAddr: String = 'H:\Akon.mp3';
begin
  if FileExists(FileAddr) then
  begin
    aFile:= TFileStream.Create(FileAddr, fmOpenReadWrite);
    try
      afile.Size := 0;
    finally
      aFile.Free;
      ShowMessage('Finish');
    end;
  end;
end;

So will something along these lines (declaring b outside the function will improve your performance in the loop, especially when dealing with a large file ). I assume that in the app filename would be a var:

const
  b: byte=0;
procedure MyProc;
var
  aFile: TFileStream;
  Buf: array of byte;
  len: integer;
  FileAddr: String;
begin
  FileAddr := 'C:\testURL.txt';
  if FileExists(FileAddr) then
  begin
    aFile := TFileStream.Create(FileAddr, fmcreate);
    try
      len := afile.Size;
      setlength(buf, len);
      fillchar(buf[0], len, b);
      aFile.Position := 0;
      aFile.Write(buf, len);
    finally
      aFile.Free;
      ShowMessage('Finish');
    end;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
the const outside the function call will be loaded with the unit, not reinitialized each time the function call is made - an assigned var outside the call will have pretty much the same effect - the point is not the const but that it's outside the function call - if you're in a tight loop with a lot of interations, it can make a difference. As for memory constraints, of course that depends on the file and the machine - if you've got a 4gb video file and 2 gb on your machine, yes, you will thrash. Still But the solution answers the question. –  Vector Apr 23 '11 at 17:36
    
Don't think delete file has the same effect as reducing file size to zero - delete simply makes it disposable to the file system, setting size to 0 should decouple the file header from its data. Not sure about this though. Which is why I'd prefer the second option, which overwrites the file and is immmensely faster than writing a byte at a time. Also for large files, chunking will help. –  Vector Apr 23 '11 at 17:39
    
1) Beware of premature optimisation: You're fiddling over a once-off cost of nano-seconds in a method that will spend way more than that depending on the size of the file it's erasing. IF this method were to be called in a tight loop with a million iterations, the const might save as much as a few milliseconds. Not to mention the fact that you're saving absolutely nothing if you compare it with FillChar(Buf[0], Len, 0);! –  Craig Young Apr 23 '11 at 19:12
1  
If you're dealing with such large files, certainly - using a fixed size buffer and chunking is the way to go. I should have read your post first - all I wanted to emphasize was that looping byte by byte is expensive - it's an operation that should be done in large chunks. As for premature optimization, I don't think it's premature, but I do agree it's not particularly relevant. –  Vector Apr 24 '11 at 0:00
1  
the const should not be classified as a premature optimisation. "premature optimisation" is a overused and misused mantra on this site. –  hplbsh May 8 '11 at 0:31
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