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I'm trying to figure out how (or if it's possible) to write an HTML helper method that could be invoked in the following manner:

@Html.MyHelper("some string parameter", @<text>
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td>some html content in a "template" @Model.SomeProperty</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
</text>)

The idea is to allow a user to create their own template to be passed to the helper. With some poking around I came up with this code:

public static MvcHtmlString jQueryTmpl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string templateId, Func<object, HelperResult> template) {
    return MvcHtmlString.Create("<script id='" + templateId + "' type='x-jquery-tmpl'>" + template.Invoke(null) + "</script>");
}

and this works, but I don't understand why or if it even makes sense. Could someone explain what <text> actually is in the background and how could I use it in the context I described above?

Thanks

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The special <text> tag exists to allow you to force a transition from code to markup in cases where the Razor parser would normally choose code mode. For example the body of an if statement defaults to code mode:

@if(condition) {
    // still in code mode
}

The razor parser has logic to automatically switch to markup mode if it detects a tag:

@if(condition) {
    <div>Hello @Model.Name</div>
}

However you might want to switch to markup mode without actually emitting some tag (as the above case would emit the <div> tags). You can either use a <text> block or the @: syntax:

@if(condition) {
    // Code mode
    <text>Hello @Model.Name <!-- Markup mode --></text>
    // Code mode again
}

@if(condition) {
    // Code mode
    @:Hello @Model.Name<!-- Will stay in markup mode till end of line -->
    // Code mode again
}

So back to your question: in this case you don't need the <text> tag because your template already has tags that will trigger the correct behavior in Razor. You could just write:

@Html.MyHelper("some string parameter", @<table>
    <tr>
      <td>some html content in a "template" @Model.SomeProperty</td>
    </tr>
</table>)

The reason this works is because the Razor parser inside of a code context recognizes the @<tag></tag> pattern and converts it into a Func<object, HelperResult>.

In your example the generated code would look roughly like this:

Write(Html.MyHelper("some string parameter",item => new System.Web.WebPages.HelperResult(__razor_template_writer => {
    WriteLiteralTo(@__razor_template_writer, "<table>\r\n      <tr>\r\n        <td>some html content in a \"template\" ");
    WriteTo(@__razor_template_writer, Model.SomeProperty);
    WriteLiteralTo(@__razor_template_writer, "</td>\r\n      </tr>\r\n    </table>");
})));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation. If I understand correctly, <text> is then just a "fake" tag that helps Razor understand my intentions, but will not be displayed with the resulting HTML, while the <table> in your example would show up in the output as it is a "real" tag. –  Marek Karbarz Apr 22 '11 at 17:02
    
Yes, <text> is just indeed just a fake tag. –  marcind Apr 22 '11 at 17:16
    
Thanks for the explanation! I've been looking for this. –  Michael Jul 14 '11 at 5:26
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