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I'm communicating with a serial port on a terminal server, so in-order guarantee is important. According to Wireshark the packets are coming in in order. The Sequences are also fine.

But my buffer that I write to with the Async Callback is sometimes, not always, receiving packet data out of order. I thought TCP guaranteed in order reception of data?

In the code below, at the very bottom, it's the InputBuffer that gets the data out of order sometimes. What's going on?

private void WaitForData()
{
    try
    {
         if (moCallBack == null)
         {
             moCallBack = new AsyncCallback(OnDataReceived);
         }
         SocketPacket theSocPkt = new SocketPacket();
         theSocPkt.thisSocket = moClientSocket;
         moResult = moClientSocket.BeginReceive(theSocPkt.dataBuffer,
                    0, theSocPkt.dataBuffer.Length,
                    SocketFlags.None,
                    moCallBack,
                    theSocPkt);
}
private void OnDataReceived(IAsyncResult asyn)
{
    try
    {
        //Set up socket data
        SocketPacket socketData = (SocketPacket)asyn.AsyncState;
        int iRx = socketData.thisSocket.EndReceive(asyn);
        if (iRx > 0 && this.modemState.State != MODEM_CONN_STATE.DISCONNECTED)
        {
            byte[] bytes = new byte[iRx];
            bytes = socketData.dataBuffer;
            Array.Resize<byte>(ref bytes, iRx);
            this.HayesBuff.AddRange(bytes);
            modemConnSMachine();
            WaitForData();
        }
    }
}

private void modemConnSMachine()
{
    switch (modemState.State)
    {
        case MODEM_CONN_STATE.CONNECTED:
             switch(chkModResp(this.HayesBuff))
             {
                 case MODEM_RESPONSE.DATA:
                      signConnectionTimeoutTimer.Change(noChatsTimeoutSec, noChatsTimeoutSec);
                      lock (this.InputBuffer)
                      {
                          this.InputBuffer.AddRange(this.HayesBuff);
                          this.HayesBuff.RemoveRange(0, HayesBuff.Count);
                      }
                      break;
share|improve this question
    
also, no ZoneAlarm or other firewall installed here. –  pedAntic Apr 22 '11 at 15:58
2  
I don't mean to nitpick, but I just wanted to point out that there's no point in doing bytes = new byte[iRx]; if you're going to do bytes = socketData.dataBuffer; immediately afterward. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Apr 22 '11 at 17:03
1  
How is your SocketPacket class obtaining its Socket object for the thisSocket field in the WaitForData method? Are you keeping your Socket object as a static reference somewhere? Is the SocketPacket class creating a new Socket object? –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Apr 22 '11 at 17:24
    
@Dr. Wily's Apprentice-- WaitForData creates a new one. Inside WaitForData: SocketPacket theSocPkt = new SocketPacket(); theSocPkt.thisSocket = moClientSocket; moResult = moClientSocket.BeginReceive(theSocPkt.dataBuffer,0,theSocPkt.dataBuffer.Length,S‌​ocketFlags.None,moCallBack,theSocPkt); –  pedAntic Jul 8 '11 at 18:03

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