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I would like to write simple Java downloader for my backup website. What is important, applet should be able to download many files at once.

So, here is my problem. Such applet seems to me easily to hack or infect. What is more, it for sure will need many system resources to run. So, I would like to hear your opinions what is the best, the most optimal and the most secure way to do it.

I thought about something like this:

//user chose directory to download his files
//fc is a FileChooser
//fc.showSaveDialog(this)==JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION
try {
    for(i=0;i<=urls.length-1;i++){

         String fileName = '...';//obtaining filename and extension

         fileName=fileName.replaceAll(" ", "_");
         //I am not sure if line above resolves all problems with names of files...

         String path = file.getAbsolutePath() + File.separator + fileName;

         try{
              InputStream is=null;
              FileOutputStream os=new FileOutputStream(path);
              URLConnection uc = urls[i].openConnection();
              is = uc.getInputStream();

              int a=is.read();
              while(a!=-1){
                  os.write(a);
                  a=is.read();
              }
              is.close();
              os.close();
         }
         catch(InterruptedIOException iioe) {
              //TODO User cancelled.
         }
         catch(IOException ioe){
              //TODO
         }
     }
}

but I am sure that there is a better solution.

There is one more thing - when user wants to download really huge amount of files (e.g. 1000, between 10MB and 1GB), there will be several problems. So, I thought about setting a limit for it, but I don't really know how to decide how many files at once is OK. Should I check user's Internet connection or computer's load?

Thanks in advance

BroMan

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would like to write simple Java downloader for my backup website. What is important, applet should be able to download many files at once.

I hope you mean sequentially like your code is written. There would be no advantage in this situation to run multiple download streams in parallel.

Such applet seems to me easily to hack or infect.

Make sure to encrypt your communication stream. Since it looks like you are just accessing URLs on the server, maybe configure your server to use HTTPS.

What is more, it for sure will need many system resources to run.

Why do you assume that? The network bandwidth will be the limiting factor. You are not going to be taxing your other resources very much. Maybe you meant avoiding saturating user's bandwidth. You can implement simple throttling by giving user a configurable delay that you insert between every file or even every iteration of your read/write loop. Use Thread.sleep to implement the delay.

So, I thought about setting a limit for it, but I don't really know how to decide how many files at once is OK.

Assuming you are doing download sequentially, setting limits isn't a technical question. More about what kind of service you want to provide. More files just means the download takes longer.

int a=is.read();

Your implementation of stream read/write is very inefficient. You want to read/write in chunks rather than single bytes. See the versions of read/write methods that take byte[].

Here is the basic logic flow to copy data from an input stream to an output stream.

InputStream in = null;
OutputStream out = null;

try
{
    in = ...
    out = ...

    final byte[] buf = new byte[ 1024 ];

    for( int count = in.read( buf ); count != -1; count = in.read( buf ) )
    {
        out.write( buf, 0, count );
    }
}
finally
{
    if( in != null )
    {
        in.close();
    }

    if( out != null )
    {
        out.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for answer. Your post is very helpful for me. But one thing: I use int a=is.read(); because I heard that using sth like buf = new byte[size]; os.write(buf); can not work on Linux. What instruction would you use? –  BroMan Apr 22 '11 at 17:48
    
Why would it not work on Linux? That makes no sense. You do need to carefully ready the API contract and pay attention to returned byte counter, but that's independent of the OS. –  Konstantin Komissarchik Apr 22 '11 at 18:27
    
I know that I ask for much, but would you give me the simplest example of it? Or at least tell me if code from here forum.4programmers.net/Java/… is gonna work correctly? –  BroMan Apr 22 '11 at 18:55
    
I am in generous mood this morning, so I updated the post with the snippet you need. Study it closely and make sure you understand why it does everything it does. Understanding how to use InputStream and OutputStream API correctly is pretty fundamental to Java coding. –  Konstantin Komissarchik Apr 22 '11 at 19:23
    
Thank you very much, you're Big Man! –  BroMan Apr 22 '11 at 19:26

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