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var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //i want this to print a new line
   /document.write(?);

}

I am printing a pyramid of stars, I can't get the new line to print.

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document.write("<br>"); // if using a .html – un5t0ppab13 Dec 30 '14 at 16:39
up vote 61 down vote accepted

Use the \n for a newline character.

document.write("\n");

You can also have more than one:

document.write("\n\n\n"); // 3 new lines!  My oh my!

However, if this is rendering to HTML, you will want to use the HTML tag for a newline:

document.write("<br>");

The string Hello\n\nTest in your source will look like this:

Hello!

Test

The string Hello<br><br>Test will look like this in HTML source:

Hello<br><br>Test

The HTML one will render as line breaks for the person viewing the page, the \n just drops the text to the next line in the source (if it's on an HTML page).

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1  
By definition, if the OP is using document.write, it's an HTML page, not an XHTML page. <br> is the correct linebreak for an HTML page. <br /> is XHTML. – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:38
    
@TJ, fixed thanks. – Tom Gullen Apr 22 '11 at 17:39

how about:

document.write ("<br>");

(assuming you are in an html page, since a line feed alone will only show as a space)

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Use a <br> tag to create a line break in the document

document.write("<br>");

Here's a sample fiddle

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1  
+1 as this seems to be what the OP is really looking for :) (br vs \n) – Demian Brecht Apr 22 '11 at 17:34
    
How do you know? Good to point out BR, but a PRE could have just as easily been in there too. If they are building ASCII art, my thought is it's plaintext. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:37
    
@Jared: How do you call document.write in a plain text document? (E.g., how do you put in the script tag?) Good point about the pre, though, could easily be a pre section. – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:40
    
@T.J. - The display is plaintext, as in ASCII art. It's still an HTML document, although, it's just showing it as plaintext display. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:42
    
@Jared: Yeah, I took your point. (I thought your other bit was about a text/plain doc, but I think I was clear about the pre being a good point.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:45

Use "\n":

document.write("\n");

Note, it has to be surrounded in double quotes for it to be interpreted as a newline. No it doesn't.

share|improve this answer
    
Outputting a newline in an HTML page won't introduce a new line in an HTML document. (And it doesn't have to be double quotes, single quotes are fine as well.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:36
    
@T.J. - Unless there's a PRE involved? – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:40
    
Ooh, except for your point commenting on another answer about a pre element. Good point. If outputting ASCII art to a pre section, \n may well be the right thing... (Edit: LOL, overlapping comments.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:42
    
@T.J. Crowder - Here's an example of what I meant (crudely developed): jsfiddle.net/wT3Ab – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 18:07
    
@Jared: Oh, your comment about pre was perfectly clear. (Closed the tag for you: jsfiddle.net/wT3Ab/1) Best, – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 18:09

document.writeln() is what you are looking for or document.write('\n' + 'words') if you are looking for more granularity in when the new line is used

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To create a new line, symbol is '\n'

var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //i want this to print a new line
   document.write('\n');

}

If you are outputting to the page, you'll want to use "<br/>" instead of '/n';

Escape characters in JavaScript

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't have to be in double quotes? – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:32
5  
No double and singe quotes are the same in JavaScript. You just can't start with a double quote and end with a single one. – Kevin Apr 22 '11 at 17:32
    
Well, I know that. Just didn't know single and doubles were treated the same in JS. Must be stuck in PHP. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:33
    
Moving between language is always a pain :) – Kevin Apr 22 '11 at 17:34
    
Good to know, thanks. Learn something new every day. :) Harmless error, probably. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:35

Alternatively, write to an element with the CSS white-space: pre and use \n for newline character.

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For a string I just write "\n" to give me a new line. For example, typing console.log("First Name: Rex" + "\n" + "Last Name: Blythe"); Will type:

First Name: Rex

Last Name: Blythe

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