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See code example below. It won't compile. I had thought that maybe it's because it has to have a single type for the first parameter in the test function. But that doesn't make sense because if I don't pattern match on it so it will compile, I can call it with both MyObj11 5 and MyObj21 5 which are two different types.

So what is it that restricts so you can't pattern match on constructors with a type class constrained parameter? Or is there some mechanism by which you can?

class SomeClass a where toString :: a -> String

instance SomeClass MyType1 where toString v = "MyType1"
instance SomeClass MyType2 where toString v = "MyType2"

data MyType1 = MyObj11 Int | MyObj12 Int Int 
data MyType2 = MyObj21 Int | MyObj22 Int Int 

test :: SomeClass a => a -> String
test (MyObj11 x) = "11"
test (MyObj12 x y) = "12" -- Error here if remove 3rd line: rigid type bound error
test (MyObj22 x y) = "22" -- Error here about not match MyType1.
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this might make sense if haskell's classes were closeable - that is, you were able to specify behaviour for every implementation. But Haskell classes are open - what should test do if given a value of type SomeoneElsesType when instance SomeClass SomeoneElsesType where toString v = "mwahahahah"? dons answer is the proper way to handle this. –  rampion Apr 22 '11 at 21:43
2  
That question seems obvious to me: it would do whatever the pattern matching said it should. And if there was no pattern match for it, it would give such an error just like any other such situation. I don't see the difference. –  taotree Apr 22 '11 at 22:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

what is it that restricts so you can't pattern match on constructors with a type class constrained parameter?

When you pattern match on an explicit constructor, you commit to a specific data type representation. This data type is not shared among all instances of the class, and so it is simply not possible to write a function that works for all instances in this way.

Instead, you need to associate the different behaviors your want with each instance, like so:

class C a where 
    toString   :: a -> String
    draw       :: a -> String

instance C MyType1 where
    toString v = "MyType1"

    draw (MyObj11 x)   = "11"  
    draw (MyObj12 x y) = "12"

instance C MyType2 where
    toString v = "MyType2"

    draw (MyObj22 x y) = "22"

data MyType1 = MyObj11 Int | MyObj12 Int Int 
data MyType2 = MyObj21 Int | MyObj22 Int Int 

test :: C a => a -> String
test x = draw x

The branches of your original test function are now distributed amongst the instances.

Some alternative tricks involve using class-associated data types (where you prove to the compiler that a data type is shared amongst all instances), or view patterns (which let you generalize pattern matching).


View patterns

We can use view patterns to clean up the connection between pattern matching and type class instances, a little, allowing us to approximate pattern matching across instances by pattern matching on a shared type.

Here's an example, where we write one function, with two cases, that lets us pattern match against anything in the class.

{-# LANGUAGE ViewPatterns #-}

class C a where 
    view       :: a -> View

data View = One Int
          | Two Int Int

data MyType1 = MyObj11 Int | MyObj12 Int Int 

instance C MyType1 where
    view (MyObj11 n) = One n
    view (MyObj12 n m) = Two n m

data MyType2 = MyObj21 Int | MyObj22 Int Int 

instance C MyType2 where
    view (MyObj21 n)   = One n
    view (MyObj22 n m) = Two n m

test :: C a => a -> String
test (view -> One n)   = "One " ++ show n
test (view -> Two n m) = "Two " ++ show n ++ show m

Note how the -> syntax lets us call back to the right view function in each instance, looking up a custom data type encoding per-type, in order to pattern match on it.

The design challenge is to come up with a view type that captures all the behavior variants you're interested in.

In your original question, you wanted every constructor to have a different behavior, so there's actually no reason to use a view type (dispatching directly to that behavior in each instance already works well enough).

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Ok, it looks like this statement is the start of the why: "When you pattern match on an explicit constructor, you commit to a specific data type representation." Okay, so why is that the case? Why is it pattern matching causes this commitment to type at that point? –  taotree Apr 22 '11 at 22:46
1  
Pattern matching deconstructs a concrete data type. You choose one specific type, and look at its constructors. That means your code can no longer work for all types. Now, you could imagine a translation of my above code, into the syntax you have for pattern matching multiple types simultaneously, but that's not how Haskell works. It's an interesting idea though. –  Don Stewart Apr 22 '11 at 22:50
    
I believe the comment-question is, why doesn't Haskell work that way? Why was this feature of the language designed in this restrictive manner? –  Dan Burton Apr 22 '11 at 23:05
1  
Hmm. My view: This goes back to ML, and writing functions inductively over data types. We design by introducing a data type, and deconstructing it via induction over the structure. That's how "FP" is done. Now, with type classes, that confuses things a bit, as functions are now written over multiple data types, but we gave up concrete pattern matching to support this. View patterns rectify this somewhat (see also research on "open data types"). TL;DR: type classes and pattern matching aren't totally unified, since that wasn't an obvious thing to do, given the historical context. –  Don Stewart Apr 22 '11 at 23:06
    
Thank you for the view patterns example. If you have groups of constructors for which you want the same behavior, you could use that example so you don't have to write the behavior in all the instances. Though the instances still have to be written and they could just point to a shared function, so... maybe I don't see where it would be especially useful. –  taotree Apr 22 '11 at 23:10

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