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In the following code, command is a DbCommand that has already been set up:

using( var dataReader = command.ExecuteReader() /*The actual execution of the query takes relatively little time.*/ ) {
                while( dataReader.Read() ) {
                    // These are what take all of the time. Replacing them all with reader.GetValues( myArray ) has no impact.
                    val0 = dataReader.GetValue( 0 );
                    val1 = dataReader.GetValue( 1 );
                    val2 = dataReader.GetValue( 2 );
                }
            }

The bulk of the time for the query I am currently working with is spent doing the GetValue calls. Is it making a round trip to the database for each GetValue call? It seems like it is, and this seems very inefficient. As the code notes, attempting to do it in one shot using GetValues() does not make a difference. Is there a way to get the entire row in one shot? Better yet, is there a way to get the entire result set in one shot?

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
using (connection)
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(
          "SELECT CategoryID, CategoryName FROM dbo.Categories;" +
          "SELECT EmployeeID, LastName FROM dbo.Employees",
          connection);
        connection.Open();

        SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();

        while (reader.HasRows)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\t{0}\t{1}", reader.GetName(0),
                reader.GetName(1));

            while (reader.Read())
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\t{0}\t{1}", reader.GetInt32(0),
                    reader.GetString(1));
            }
            reader.NextResult();
        }
    }
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4  
This isn't any faster than the code I posted in the original question (it's roughly the same), but I think it's the fastest of the answers. At least we know now that there isn't some way-faster method that I was missing. –  Greg Smalter Apr 29 '12 at 18:46
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I did some benchmarking myself with various approaches:

public DataTable Read1(string query)
{
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = query;
        cmd.Connection.Open();
        var table = new DataTable();
        using (var r = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            table.Load(r);
        return table;
    }
}

public DataTable Read2<S>(string query) where S : IDbDataAdapter, IDisposable, new()
{
    using (var da = new S())
    {
        using (da.SelectCommand = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            da.SelectCommand.CommandText = query;
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            da.Fill(ds);
            return ds.Tables[0];
        }
    }
}

public IEnumerable<S> Read3<S>(string query, Func<IDataRecord, S> selector)
{
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = query;
        cmd.Connection.Open();
        using (var r = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            while (r.Read())
                yield return selector(r);
    }
}

public S[] Read4<S>(string query, Func<IDataRecord, S> selector)
{
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = query;
        cmd.Connection.Open();
        using (var r = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            return ((DbDataReader)r).Cast<IDataRecord>().Select(selector).ToArray();
    }
}

public List<S> Read5<S>(string query, Func<IDataRecord, S> selector)
{
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = query;
        cmd.Connection.Open(); 
        using (var r = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            var items = new List<S>();
            while (r.Read())
                items.Add(selector(r));
            return items;
        }
    }
}

1 and 2 returns DataTable while the rest strongly typed result set, so its exactly not apples to apples, but I while time them accordingly.

Just the essentials:

Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    Read1(query); // ~8900 - 9200ms

    Read1(query).Rows.Cast<DataRow>().Select(selector).ToArray(); // ~9000 - 9400ms

    Read2<MySqlDataAdapter>(query); // ~1750 - 2000ms

    Read2<MySqlDataAdapter>(query).Rows.Cast<DataRow>().Select(selector).ToArray(); // ~1850 - 2000ms

    Read3(query, selector).ToArray(); // ~1550 - 1750ms

    Read4(query, selector); // ~1550 - 1700ms

    Read5(query, selector); // ~1550 - 1650ms
}

sw.Stop();
MessageBox.Show(sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString());

The query returned about 1200 rows and 5 fields (run for 100 times). Apart from Read1 all performed well. Of all I prefer Read3 which returns data lazily, as enumerated. This is great for memory if you only need to enumerate it. To have a copy of the collection in memory, you're better off with Read4 or Read5 as you please.

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+1 - Interesting, especially the comparison between DataTable.Load() and IDataAdapter.Fill(). I would have thought that the data adapter was the same or slower than loading directly to a DataTable, but it looks like it is 4-5x faster? Any idea why? –  Tim Medora Feb 13 '13 at 19:11
    
@TimMedora no idea, but I confirmed it trying with SQLite Connector as well which yielded just the same result which I answered here. Its so odd nevertheless. –  nawfal Feb 13 '13 at 19:13
    
@TimMedora: You need to surround the DataTable.Load() with .BeginLoadData() and .EndLoadData() to achieve the same speed as with the DataSet. –  Nikola Bogdanović Apr 18 at 14:43
    
This answer contains useful information, but doesn't address the OP's question. –  William Gross 19 hours ago
    
@NikolaBogdanović I will try and update when I get time. –  nawfal 19 hours ago
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I would use something like dapper-dot-net to load it into a basic type model; this is a micro-ORM, so you get the benefits of meta-programming (efficiently pre-generated IL etc) - without the overhead of things like EF or DataTable.

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I don't think this would help with his specific question about data readers. Dapper itself uses DbDataReader.GetValue under the hood. –  William Gross 20 hours ago
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You could use a DbDataAdapter to get all the results and store them in a DataTable. How are you using the the data after you read it?

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        Dim adapter As New Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter(sqlCommand)
        Dim DT As New DataTable
        adapter.Fill(DT)
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