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I am writing the following get and set for validating an input from a Text Box. Basically it is supposed to check if the user has entered all of the values. When I leave the TextBoxes empty , it does nothing and shows a '0' in output where that variable was being used. It does however show the system generated exception and stops the execution, but I wonder why doesn't it validate the input through the properties?

Here is my code:

public double RecoDoseSize
{
    get
    {
        return recoDoseSize;
    }
    set
    {
        if (!(value>0))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Please Enter the recommended dose size for this product");
            textBox8.Focus();
        }
        recoDoseSize = value;
    }
}

private void Submit2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    TotalContentProduct = double.Parse(textBox7.Text);
    recoDoseSize = double.Parse(textBox8.Text);
    NoOfDosespUnit = TotalContentProduct/recoDoseSize;
}
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I'm not that clear on the code example. Is recoDoseSize the same as RecoDoseSize or it's an unrelated private variable? Are you referring to this.RecoDoseSize? –  dawebber Apr 22 '11 at 18:36
    
The reason you get a 0 in the case you described is because of ParseMethod doing its best on an default value of Text property in the textbox. –  dawebber Apr 22 '11 at 18:37
    
@dawebber: Since the getter of RecoDoseSize returns recoDoseSize, I guess they are related. ;-) –  Heinzi Apr 22 '11 at 18:37
1  
You need to watch out for RecoDoseSize being 0 (zero) to avoid that nasty divide-by-zero you're letting your user walk into. Also, I'd rename the property to DoseSize or RecommendedDoseSize if this is in a "public" library anyone else might use: what the heck is "Reco" would be my first question. –  Craig Eddy Apr 22 '11 at 18:49
    
@Heinzi--there is quite a bit to guess in this code sample. The real point of my comment was to demonstrate to the OP that one should be more specific with code samples. I would agree with you though, and that was an answer-to-be: use the Property, not the private var. –  dawebber Apr 22 '11 at 19:31
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Other have given the correct answer to the question as stated. Namely that you should call the uppercased RecoDoseSize if you want to use the getter/setter.

However it is extremely bad practice to show a message box inside the setter, because it violates the Principle of Least Surprise.

When someone looks at the line RecoDoseSize = double.Parse(textBox8.Text); it is not at all obvious that this operation could cause a message box to appear.

There are occasionally exceptions where it does make sense to have a setter trigger UI changes (for instance the Visible property on controls) however the default should always be to not do this unless you are sure it will be more confusing to not do so (for instance it would be surprising if you set Visible = false however it was still visible).

Regarding your comment on how you should implement it, the checking should be done in the click handler and the property can just be an auto-property, like so:

public double RecoDoseSize { get; set; }

private void Submit2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    TotalContentProduct = double.Parse(textBox7.Text);

    double enteredSize;
    if (!double.TryParse(textBox8.Text, out enteredSize) || enteredSize <= 0)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Please Enter the recommended dose size for this product");
        textBox8.Focus();
        return;
    }
    RecoDoseSize = enteredSize;
    NoOfDosespUnit = TotalContentProduct / recoDoseSize;
}

You'll want to use TryParse because with Parse you'll get an error if the text isn't a valid double. What TryParse does is return true or false depending on whether it succeeded, and it populates the out parameter with the result if it's successful.

So what this does is if it either failed to parse the result, or the result is <= 0 it shows the message box. In that case it also returns from the method so the rest of it isn't executed. Alternatively the rest of the method could be in an else block in which case the return isn't needed. It's a matter a style which way is preferred.

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Could you please me how else should I implement this functionality in my code? I am kinda learning by doing here:( –  MangoTable Apr 22 '11 at 19:05
    
@Mango you may also want to use TryParse for textBox7 too. If you use Parse you're saying I know for a fact that the text will be a valid double, just parse it for me. Use TryParse when you're not 100% sure it will be valid. You may also want to consider renaming the text boxes to something representing what they hold. –  Davy8 Apr 22 '11 at 19:22
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You are setting recoDoseSize, the backing field, not RecoDoseSize, the property which has your code in it. Thus, your code isn't executed. You need to change the second line of your method body to

RecoDoseSize = double.Parse(textBox8.Text);

(note the capital R).

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2  
Another example of why differing properties and fields by case is a bad idea. –  Pondidum Apr 22 '11 at 18:42
1  
@Pondidum: Nah, it normally works (if you know what you are doing of course), i still recently switched to underscored fields though. –  H.B. Apr 22 '11 at 18:49
    
@Pond unless you're using a bad font (or have particularly bad eyes I guess) it's very easy to see the difference between upper and lowercased first letters. (Middle of the a variable name may be more tricky since your eyes don't naturally focus as much as on the first/last letter) –  Davy8 Apr 22 '11 at 18:53
    
Thanks all for the help. My bad,I changed it to RecoDoseSize, yet It still does the same thing. It throws the system generated error when I click the button but Msg Box is never displayed.:( –  MangoTable Apr 22 '11 at 18:56
    
@Mango the error you're getting is probably coming from Parse because it was unable to convert the text into a valid double. Use the TryParse in my answer. –  Davy8 Apr 22 '11 at 19:48
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You're never actually using the getter/setter. You are using the actual field name: recoDoseSize directly. Change it to RecoDoseSize.

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private void Submit2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    TotalContentProduct = double.Parse(textBox7.Text);
    RecoDoseSize= double.Parse(textBox8.Text);
    NoOfDosespUnit = TotalContentProduct/recoDoseSize;
}
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You shouldn't be handling focus in your set statement.

Also, you need to make sure that value is not null, otherwise you can't compare it to anything (greater-than, etc.).

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2  
the property is a double, so value is a (non-nullable) double also. It won't be null. –  Hans Kesting Apr 22 '11 at 18:38
2  
Lowercase double can never be null. Unless it's a nullable type: double? –  pickypg Apr 22 '11 at 18:39
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