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here's the code, showing the inputs and the required output.

Basically, I'm trying to self-join to match the results of my broker's statement with my internal records. So left set of columns is broker's list, right side is my list. If broker has a position, and I don't, NULLs on the right. If I have a position and broker doesn't, NULLs on the left.

The left join + right join + union works exactly as I want. Seems like there should be some voodoo to allow a full join to get that without two selects, but I can't figure it out.

drop table MatchPositions
go

create table MatchPositions
( 
    mt_source varchar (10),
    mt_symbol varchar (10),
    mt_qty float,
    mt_price float
)

go

insert into MatchPositions values ('BROKER', 'IBM', 100, 50.25)
insert into MatchPositions values ('BROKER', 'MSFT', 75, 30)
insert into MatchPositions values ('BROKER', 'GOOG', 25, 500)
insert into MatchPositions values ('BROKER', 'SPY', 200, 113)

insert into MatchPositions values ('MODEL', 'MSFT', 75, 30)
insert into MatchPositions values ('MODEL', 'GOOG', 25, 500)
insert into MatchPositions values ('MODEL', 'GLD', 300, 150)

go

select * from MatchPositions b
left join MatchPositions m on b.mt_symbol = m.mt_symbol and m.mt_source = 'MODEL'
where b.mt_source = 'BROKER'
union

select * from MatchPositions b
right join MatchPositions m on b.mt_symbol = m.mt_symbol and b.mt_source = 'BROKER'
where m.mt_source = 'MODEL'

and here's the expected output:

mt_source  mt_symbol  mt_qty                 mt_price               mt_source  mt_symbol  mt_qty                 mt_price
---------- ---------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------------------- ----------------------
NULL       NULL       NULL                   NULL                   MODEL      GLD        300                    150
BROKER     GOOG       25                     500                    MODEL      GOOG       25                     500
BROKER     IBM        100                    50.25                  NULL       NULL       NULL                   NULL
BROKER     MSFT       75                     30                     MODEL      MSFT       75                     30
BROKER     SPY        200                    113                    NULL       NULL       NULL                   NULL
share|improve this question
    
what version of sql are you using? – Dave Apr 22 '11 at 18:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted
;WITH T1 AS
(
SELECT *
FROM MatchPositions 
WHERE mt_source = 'BROKER'
), T2 AS
(
SELECT *
FROM MatchPositions 
WHERE mt_source = 'MODEL'
)
SELECT *
FROM T1 FULL JOIN T2 ON T1.mt_symbol = T2.mt_symbol
share|improve this answer
    
CTEs, of course! (facepalm). Thanks, that also solves the more general case (which I didn't post) where the tables are a bit more complex and putting stuff in 'where' vs. 'join' gets dicey in the presence of NULLs. Your solution fixes all of those. – Eric H. Apr 22 '11 at 19:29

Possibly using an isnull function:

SELECT *
FROM MatchPositions b
  FULL JOIN MatchPositions m on b.mt_symbol = m.mt_symbol
                            and b.mt_source != m.mt_source
WHERE isnull(b.mt_source, 'BROKER') = 'BROKER'
  and isnull(m.mt_source, 'MODEL') = 'MODEL'
share|improve this answer
    
almost right, but wrapping the mt_source column in a function negates any possible use of indices. See better approach below. – Nicholas Carey Apr 22 '11 at 19:38
SELECT *
FROM MatchPositions b
  FULL JOIN MatchPositions m ON b.mt_symbol = m.mt_symbol
                            AND b.mt_source = 'BROKER'
                            AND m.mt_source = 'MODEL'

This filters the table into the 'BROKER' and 'MODEL' parts before outer joining them.

share|improve this answer
    
Returns 12 rows not the desired 5 (as shown here data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/q/98523) – Martin Smith Apr 22 '11 at 19:25
    
I admit to not testing this first. Sorry about that. Nice link BTW. – Neil Apr 22 '11 at 19:39

Try this:

select *
from      MatchPositions broker
full join MatchPositions model  on model.mt_symbol =  broker.mt_symbol
                               and model.mt_source <> broker.mt_source
where ( broker.mt_source = 'BROKER' or broker.MT_SOURCE is null )
  and ( model.mt_source  = 'MODEL'  or model.MT_SOURCE is null )

From the first logical source table, you want either broker rows, or missing rows.

From the second logical source table, you want either model rows or missing rows.

share|improve this answer

If your RDBMS supports FULL JOIN (also known as FULL OUTER JOIN):

SELECT *
FROM (SELECT * FROM MatchPositions WHERE mt_source = 'BROKER') b
FULL
JOIN (SELECT * FROM MatchPositions WHERE mt_source = 'MODEL' ) m
  ON b.mt_symbol = m.mt_symbol

This solution is basically same as Martin's, just uses a different syntax, which may be helpful in case your RDBMS doesn't support CTEs.

share|improve this answer
    
That returns 4 rows rather than 5 with the OP's data (it excludes the NULL one at the top of the desired output) – Martin Smith Apr 22 '11 at 18:54
    
@Martin: Fixed, thanks for noticing. – Andriy M Apr 22 '11 at 19:02
    
Hate to break this to you but it returns 9 rows now! – Martin Smith Apr 22 '11 at 19:12
    
@Martin. Fixed again, thanks again. Honestly, I was trying to avoid posting this final solution. I knew it would work, just wanted to find something not so plain obvious. Haven't grown enough for that yet, I guess. – Andriy M Apr 22 '11 at 19:51

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