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Need to catch any undefined within the entire structure space of the an object literal. The issue is that the location of the undefined will not be predictable:

.object    
     .result2[0] <--undefined could show its ugly face here, or anywhere above or below!
              .thumbnails[0]
                            .type
                                 .name
                                      .['open']

This doesn't work:

if ( typeof object.result2[0].thumbnails[0].....  type == 'undefined'){     
    console.log("err'd out")
    handleError();
}

So I guess I am looking for a solution that follows: if anything within object is undefined do something, or am I barking up the wrong tree?

share|improve this question
    
Personally, I usually just use a try/catch or several if conditions for this. –  Justin Morgan Apr 22 '11 at 19:24
    
try catch for production? –  cube Apr 22 '11 at 19:27
    
Sure, what's wrong with that? Try/catch is legitimate code. If you suspect there might be a different error thrown, you can always check the error's contents and re-throw or handle if it's not a null reference exception. There's nothing inherently evil about try/catch, only some potential overhead from constructing information about the exception. –  Justin Morgan Apr 22 '11 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're doing this sort of thing a lot then a little helper function is useful:

function dig_out(o, path, def) {
    var parts = path.split('.');
    for(var i = 0; i < parts.length; ++i) { 
        if(typeof o == 'undefined') 
            return def; 
        o = o[parts[i]];  
    }
    return o;
}
obj = { a: [1, [2, { b: 10 } ]]};
var x = dig_out(ob, 'a.1.1.b'); // x is now 10

The trick is to realize that this:

object.results2[0].thumbnails[0].type.name["open"]

can also be written as:

object['results2'][0]['thumbnails'][0]['type']['name']['open']

And that can be easily represented as a string:

'results2.0.thumbnails.0.type.name.open'

that is easy to understand and parse.

You could also represent the path as an array (as CD Sanchez does) but then you'd have to do something with the default value, def.

You could also allow the path argument to be an array:

function dig_out(o, path, def) {
    var parts = path instanceof Array ? path : path.split('.');
    for(var i = 0; i < parts.length; ++i) {
        if(typeof o == 'undefined')
            return def;
        o = o[parts[i]];
    }
    return o;
}
obj = { a: [1, [2, { b: 10 } ]]};
var x = dig_out(obj, 'a.1.1.b');        // x is now 10
var y = dig_out(obj, ['a', 1, 1, 'b']); // y is now 10

Then you'd have some flexibility as to which argument format was easiest to work with and it wouldn't even cost that much. Thanks to a small discussion with CD Sanchez for this idea.

share|improve this answer
    
This is an awesome bit of info, not specifically for this question but for my general JavaScript knowledge. +1. –  Justin Morgan Apr 22 '11 at 19:22
    
Yeah, mine would be more versatile if it were tweaked to return the object. However, on yours I do have to comment that passing the path as a string may not be the best way to do this because you may end up with ugly string concatentations (or at best, a join on an array of values) if you're doing it inside a loop for example. e.g. dig_out(object, 'results2.'+i+'.thumbnails' ...) –  Cristian Sanchez Apr 22 '11 at 19:24
    
@CD: Which approach you took would depend on the specific circumstances. You could also check to see if the second argument was a string or an array; if it was a string then split it, if it was an array then just use it as-is. You wouldn't have the variadic behavior but an array would probably be easier to work with in a bunch of nested loops. –  mu is too short Apr 22 '11 at 19:29
    
Works well for my situation. Thanks for the help! –  cube Apr 22 '11 at 19:34
    
@CD: I added an update with flexible argument handling, I think that gives us the best of both worlds. –  mu is too short Apr 22 '11 at 19:35

Generally you use

if (object && object.result2[0] && object.results2[0].thumbnails[0] && object.results2[0].thumbnails[0].type && object.results2[0].thumbnails[0].type.name) {
    object.results2[0].thumbnails[0].type.name["open"] 
}

The fact that this looks ugly is a problem with your nesting and that things can be undefined at each level.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, so I have to literally test each level? –  cube Apr 22 '11 at 19:13
    
@cube yes you do. That or write a helper function like the other guys have. –  Raynos Apr 22 '11 at 19:14

Simple try-catch block will do the trick, without need to test each level.

share|improve this answer
    
Your recommending try catch in production code? –  cube Apr 22 '11 at 19:26
1  
@cube - Does your company have a policy against try/catch in production code? There's certainly the potential for abuse, but other than Joel Spolsky's rather controversial discussion on the subject, and some performance considerations which may/may not be relevant, I'm not aware of any broad consensus that try/catch is considered harmful. –  Justin Morgan Apr 22 '11 at 20:31
    
try catch is bad for JavaScript performance. it really should be avoided especially for something as simple as this. –  Raynos Apr 22 '11 at 22:11

If you really want to keep your code clean, you could make a simple function to check if all the keys exist.

function pathExists() { // untested, but the basis is sound
    var obj = arguments[0], path = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1), cursor = obj;
    for (var i = 0; i < path.length; ++i) {
        if (typeof cursor[path[i]] == "undefined") return false;
        cursor = cursor[path[i]];
    }
    return cursor;
}

if (!pathExists(object, "result2", 0, "type", "name", "open")) 
   console.log("bork");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input also. –  cube Apr 22 '11 at 19:36

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