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I have a library of static final Java classes which describes a body of standards. One of these classes (simplified) night look like:

public static final class ResponseControl { 
    public static enum EventStatus {
        EVENT_RECEIVED,
        EVENT_STARTED,
        EVENT_COMPLETED;
    }
}

It's convenient to include the enum EventStatusOption as a subclass of the class ResponseControl, because that's where it's defined in the standards document, and that's where people will be looking for it. It allows them to say things like:

if (respCtl.status == ResponseControl.EventStatus.EVENT_STARTED) { ... }

But I have literally hundreds of these classes, and in some cases the same enum is used in multiple classes. It would be nice to be able to define the enum somewhere else, and then do something like this:

public static enum GlobalEventStatus {
    EVENT_RECEIVED,
    EVENT_STARTED,
    EVENT_COMPLETED;
}
public static final class ResponseControl { 
    public static enum EventStatus extends GlobalEventStatus {}
    public final EventStatus status;
}

if (respCtl.status == ResponseControl.EventStatus.EVENT_STARTED) { ... }

I can't do this, however, because it isn't legal to extend enums, even (as in my case) where I don't really want to extend them at all, I just want to make the global type available in the local class. Does anyone know of a way to accomplish this?


The second paragraph of ColinD's answer below is actually the answer I needed. By saying:

public interface GlobalEvent
{
    public static enum Status {
        EVENT_RECEIVED,
        EVENT_STARTED,
        EVENT_COMPLETED;
    }
}

public static final class ResponseControl {
    public static enum Event implements GlobalEvent
    public final Event.Status status;
}

I can allow my users to say:

if (respCtl.status == ResponseControl.Event.Status.EVENT_STARTED) { ... }

...all while still maintaining the actual definitions in a single place. Thanks.

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1  
What's wrong with just making the enum a top-level (i.e. non-nested) enum? –  Jim Garrison Apr 22 '11 at 19:00
1  
Oh, and BTW, your use of "subclass" is incorrect. You are describing a "nested class", as in the enum declaration is nested inside a class. It is not a subclass of anything. In fact, by declaring it static you are making it exactly the same as a top-level class. –  Jim Garrison Apr 22 '11 at 19:01
    
There's nothing really wrong with simply referencing the top-level enum, and that may be what I'll have to do. But my users will be looking for EVENT_STARTED in connection with the class ResponseControl, because that's the context they use it in... they might not know or care that the same value gets used in several other classes. The standards documents redundantly re-define the valid values each time they are referenced, and I could do the same thing... but I'd prefer not to. –  EQvan Apr 22 '11 at 19:07
    
If the users are looking for an event status, the code should make it clear what to look for. For example, if you were using a top-level EventStatus type, respCtl.status would have type EventStatus. That would make it clear where to look for the constants. –  ColinD Apr 22 '11 at 19:12
    
It probably will be good enough, and it's probably what I'll do. But what with one thing and another, this data structure tends to get used as a quick reference. My users will want to know what the available events codes for a ResponseControl are, and they'll quickly type a code fragment into Eclipse and use it to do the lookup. It's just a convenience thing. –  EQvan Apr 22 '11 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just use a common top-level type called EventStatus. That's normal and I don't think any Java programmer will find it confusing at all... what you're trying to do sounds more confusing.

If what you're looking for is a common set of enum constants and then subclasses that define additional constants specific to a certain class... well, you're pretty much out of luck there. You can't do that with enums. One option (not saying it's the best) would be to make EventStatus an interface and then have GlobalEventStatus be an enum that implements that interface. You could then have another enum ResponseControl.Status or some such that also implements EventStatus.

I should also mention that something like ResponseControl.EventStatus is not a "subclass" but a "nested class".

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Yes, I realize that the word "subclass" was wrongly used. Some day I'll manage to post something here that doesn't make any misteaks. –  EQvan Apr 22 '11 at 19:11
    
see comment below –  EQvan Apr 22 '11 at 22:34
    
No, actually see the extension to my original post, above. –  EQvan Apr 22 '11 at 22:48
    
@EQvan: Hmm, that wasn't quite what I meant, and it still seems like a strange way of doing things that would confuse me if I were a user of your code (ResponseControl.Event being an enum for no particular reason is very odd). In retrospect, I don't think that what I was suggesting would work particularly well for what you're trying to do either though.... –  ColinD Apr 22 '11 at 23:07

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