Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
switch (indexPath.section) {  
  case 0: //products used  
    NSString * chemical = [selectedChemicals objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];  
    cell.textLabel.text = chemical;  
    break;  
  case 1: //areas sprayed  
    return [selectedAreas count];  
    break;  
  case 2://target pests  
    return [selectedPests count];  
    break;  
  case 3://notes  
    return 1;  
    break;  
}

gives me:   "/Users/grady/programming/ObjectivelyBetter/bioguard/Classes/JobWizardViewController.m:147: error: 'chemical' undeclared (first use in this function)"

putting a blank semi-colon at the beginning of the case fixes it.

switch (indexPath.section) {  
  case 0: //products used  
    ;  
    NSString * chemical = [selectedChemicals objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];  
    cell.textLabel.text = chemical;  
    break;  
  case 1: //areas sprayed  
    return [selectedAreas count];  
    break;  
  case 2://target pests  
    return [selectedPests count];  
    break;  
  case 3://notes  
    return 1;  
    break;  
} 
share|improve this question
    
You don't need to manually put all the   to format your code; just select it and click the button that looks like "{ }". –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 22 '11 at 19:50
    
thank you, it was highly annoying. –  Grady Player Apr 22 '11 at 19:52
    
please post in your code again and click the "{}" button. that will also result in color highlighted code. –  vikingosegundo Apr 22 '11 at 19:55
    
Someone else has already done that, just waiting for edit approval. –  BoltClock Apr 22 '11 at 19:57
    
Just a suggestion, not a solution to your question. You don't need the break statements after the return. –  Tommy Apr 22 '11 at 19:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you declare variables within a case statement, it's a good practice (and required to avoid these kinds of errors) to enclose the statements inside curly braces, e.g.

case 0:
    {
        int i = 0;
        ....
        break;
    }

Not sure why a semicolon along would have "solved" the issue. That's kind of odd... the curly braces are what you need.

In your particular case you could also just eliminate the local variable declaration and set the cell textLabel like so:

  cell.textLabel.text = [selectedChemicals objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
share|improve this answer
    
you're right, as for the weirdness... I think I have it figured out sort of, it has to do with switch expansion. the semicolon is the whole expression for the first case, then it just falls through to the second expression... third expression, until it reaches break. seems like a bug in GCC to not perform consistent constraint checking. –  Grady Player Apr 22 '11 at 20:11
    
I saw this same problem years ago using plain old C and C++ on Solaris. It's not a new thing, but more surprisingly, it's still a "problem." Live and learn I guess. Funny how "best practices" are often patterns that work around things that are anything but "best". :-) –  MarkGranoff Apr 22 '11 at 20:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.