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Should developers avoid using continue in C# or its equivalent in other languages to force the next iteration of a loop? Would arguments for or against overlap with arguments about Goto?

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Feb 4 '13 at 18:00

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1  
This is bound to spark a flame war between the two camps. This is a personal decision, and there are plenty of arguments for and against that can be found elsewhere. –  Outlaw Programmer Sep 11 '08 at 21:08
1  
The answers so far are pretty one-sided and I've seen at least two arguments that I had never thought of or seen elsewhere. –  brian Sep 11 '08 at 21:18

17 Answers 17

up vote 71 down vote accepted

I think there should be more use of continue!

Too often I come across code like:

for (...)
{
   if (!cond1)
   {
      if (!cond2)
      {
          ... highly indented lines ...
      }
   }
}

instead of

for (...)
{
   if (cond1 || cond2)
   {
      continue;
   }

   ...
}

Use it to make the code more readable!

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or even: for (...) { if (cond1 || cond2) continue; ... } I use it like this all the time, get your breakout on one line –  johnc Sep 12 '08 at 6:23
    
Damn, that above comment would've worked better with a line breaks working, the point being keep if (cond1 || cond2) continue; on one line –  johnc Sep 12 '08 at 6:24
1  
Why not do if (!cond1 && !cond2) { execute code } instead of if (cond1 || cond2) continue? –  Dennis Apr 16 '11 at 8:11
5  
@Dennis - the point is to keep the interesting code in the 'execute code' block as far to the left of the screen as possible. I also find it easier to read conditionals without negations in them most of the time. –  Rob Walker Apr 26 '11 at 19:30
1  
@Dennis: Because you want to avoid "god" conditionals, which semantically encase a small amount of logic but physically seem to enclose your entire code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 12 '11 at 8:33
  1. Using continue at the beginning of a loop to avoid iteration over unnecessary elements is not harmful and can be very useful, but using it in the middle of nested ifs and elses can turn the loop code into a complex maze, to understand and validate.

  2. I think its usage avoidance is also the result of a semantic misunderstanding. People who does never see/write 'continue' keyword on their code, when seeing a code with continue can interpret it as "the continuation of the natural flow". If instead of continue we had next, for instance, I think more people would appreciate this valuable cursor feature.

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As far as this programmer is concerned, Nested if/else considered harmful.

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I'd say: "it depends".

If you have reasonably small loop code (where you can see the whole loop-code without scrolling) its usually ok to use a continue.

However, if the loops body is large (for example due to a big switch), and there is some followup code (say below the switch), you may easily introduce bugs by adding a continue and thus skipping over that code sometimes. I have encountered this in the heart of a bytecode interpreter, where some instrumentation code was sometimes not executed due to a continue in some case-branches.

This might be a somewhat artificially constructed case, but I generally try to avoid continue and use an if (but not nesting too deep as in the Rob's sample code).

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If you are iterating through any kind of a result set, and performing operations on said results, for e.g within a for each, and if one particular result caused a problem, its rather useful in capturing an expected error (via try-catch), logging it, and moving on to the next result via continue. Continue is especially useful, imo, for unattended services that do jobs at odd hours, and one exception shouldn't affect the other x number of records.

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I'd say yes. To me, it just breaks the 'flow' of a fluidly-written piece of code.

Another argument could also be that if you stick to the basic keywords supported by most modern languages, then your program flow (if not the logic or code) could be ported to any other language. Having an unsupported keyword (ie, continue or goto) would break that.

It's really more of a personal preference, but I've never had to use it and don't really consider it an option when I'm writing new code. (same as goto.)

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I believe the bottom line argument against continue is that it makes it harder to PROVE that the code is correct. This is prove in the mathematical sense. But it probably doesn't matter to you because no one has the resources to 'prove' a computer program that is significantly complex.

Enter the static-analysis tools. You may make things harder on them...

And the goto, that sounds like a nightmare for the same reasons but at any random place in code.

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1  
Generally break and continue avoid the need for either auxilary variables or code duplication. They should therefore make it easier to prove code. Not that prooving code is something I'm likely to try. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 6 '08 at 17:08
    
No, not "any random place in code". Perhaps you're thinking of longjmp, which is not the same as goto. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 10:22

Others have hinted at it... but continue and break are enforced by the compiler and have their own associated rules. Goto has no such limitations, though the net effect might almost be the same, in some circumstances.

I do not consider continue or break to be harmful per se, though I'm sure either can be used poorly in a way that would make any sane programmer gag.

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continue and break are enforced by the compiler and have their own associated rules. Goto has no such limitations Er, how's that then? Do you think that goto breaks scope rules? Because that's a myth‌​... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 10:20
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit - the link to your post regarding use of goto in C++ was fascinating but way more detailed than the level I was thinking at! Clearly I was inaccurate to suggest goto has few compiler rules about its use, but I think I intended to imply was that continue and break went to defined places in the closest enclosing loop that can often be identified by indentation of the code - loosely speaking for break you look down and for continue you look up. –  Nij Sep 19 '13 at 7:30

I like to use continue at the beginning of loops for handling simple if conditions.

To me it makes the code more readable since there is not extra nesting and you can see that I have explicitly dealt with these cases.

Is this the same reason that I would use a goto? Perhaps. I do use them for readability at times and to stop the nesting of code but I usually use them more for cleanup/error handling.

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There are not harmful keywords. There's only harmful uses of them.

Goto is not harmful per se, neither is continue. They need to be used carefully, that's all.

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This got me thinking "what would be a non-harmful use of goto?". Sure enough there's a StackOverflow question for that: stackoverflow.com/questions/24451/goto-usage –  thomasrutter May 31 '10 at 7:08

If continue is causing a problem with readability, then chances are you have other problems. For example, massive amounts of code inside a for loop. If you have to write large for loops, I would try to stick to using continue close to the top of the for loop. Otherwise, a continue buried deep in the middle of a for loop can easily be missed.

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goto can be used as a continue, but not the reverse.

You can "goto" anywhere, thus break flow control arbitrarily.

Thus continue, not nearly as harmful.

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1  
No, you can't "goto" "anywhere". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 10:21

continue feels wrong to me. break gets you out of there, but continue seems just to be spaghetti.

On the other hand, you can emulate continue with break (at least in Java).

for (String str : strs) contLp: {
    ...
       continue contLp;
    ...
}

continue can be useful in some circumstances, but it still feels dirty to me.

for (char c : cs) {
    final int i;
    if ('0' <= c && c <= '9') {
        i = c - '0';
    } else if ('a' <= c && c <= 'z') {
        i = c - 'a' + 10;
    } else {
        continue;
    }
    ... use i ...
}
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I agree. For me it seems procedural. –  Chuck Conway Oct 7 '09 at 20:18

Continue is a really useful function in most languages, because it allows blocks of code to be skipped for certain conditions.

One alternative would be to uses boolean variables in if statements, but these would need to be reset after every use.

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You can write good code with or without continue and you can write bad code with or without continue.

There probably is some overlap with arguments about goto, but as far as I'm concerned the use of continue is equivalent to using break statements (in loops) or return statement from anywhere in a method body - if used correctly it can simplify the code (less likely to contain bugs, easier to maintain).

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Is continue any more harmful than, say, break?

If anything, in the majority of cases where I encounter/use it, I find it makes code clearer and less spaghetti-like.

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If, and only if RAII is used. Breaks and continues can otherwise cause memory leaks or worse. –  Fox Nov 19 '09 at 20:37
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@Fox: That's the fault of anyone who's made a mess of object ownership/lifetime. Not of continue or break. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 12 '11 at 8:34
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit entirely agree. Most good programming teams just happen to codify such rules. –  Fox Jan 31 '12 at 6:43
    
@Fox: Better late than never? :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 10:17

I don't think continue could ever be as difficult as goto since continue never moves execution out of the code block that it is in.

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