Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi so I am trying to take a cstring and make it lowercase, but when I am printing the cstring at the end I am getting a weird format box where some of the letters should be. Do anyone have any ideas?

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;

int main () 
{ 
    int i=0; 
    char* str="TEST"; 
    char c; 
    char* cstr = new char[strlen(str) + 1];
    while (str[i]) 
    { 
        c = str[i]; 
        c = tolower(c);
        strcat(cstr, &c); 
        i++; 
    } 

    cout << cstr << endl; 
    return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
    
There's something ironic about using char * and new and not using std::string class. See std::transform for converting an std::string to lowercase. –  Thomas Matthews Apr 22 '11 at 23:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are calling strcat incorrectly. The second parameter is not a null-terminated string.

You really don't need to call strcat at all. Just write directly to the output string:

Try:

  while (str[i])
  {
    c = str[i];
    c = tolower(c);
    cstr[i] = c;
        i++;
  }
  cstr[i] = 0;

or, equivalently:

while(str[i])
{
  cstr[i] = tolower(str[i]);
  i++;
}
cstr[i] = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
I thought that strcat seemed out of place. Nicely job putting that in simple easy to read code. –  Tyler Ferraro Apr 22 '11 at 21:20
    
seg faults- at str[i] = tolower(str[i] –  trev9065 Apr 22 '11 at 21:21
    
@trev9065 - yes, that is a different bug. I'll add it to the description. –  Robᵩ Apr 22 '11 at 21:23
    
-1 It seg faults because this code is trying to modify a string constant. I'll undo my -1 when this is fixed/addressed. :-) –  Emile Cormier Apr 22 '11 at 21:23
2  
@trev9065: Do you now see why std::string is preferable to old school c-strings? Even experienced folks have a hard time getting c-strings right the first time. :-) –  Emile Cormier Apr 22 '11 at 21:38
#include <cstddef>
#include <cctype>
#include <cstring>
#include <ostream>
#include <iostream>

#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string str = "TEST";
    std::string cstr;

    for (std::string::const_iterator it = str.begin(); it!= str.end(); ++it)
        cstr.push_back(tolower(*it));

    std::cout << cstr << std::endl;
}

Or even shorter:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

...

    std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), std::back_inserter(cstr), tolower);
share|improve this answer
    
noticed codepad wouldn't resolve the transform overload - no time to figure it out. Reverting to previous version of answer –  sehe Apr 22 '11 at 21:42

strcat expects a null-terminated char*, so by giving the address of a local char you are invoking undefined behavior.

Additionally, new char[std::strlen(str) + 1] does not initialize the array to 0s, meaning cstr won't be properly null-terminated either; adding () to the new[] causes the array to be value-initialized.

Try this instead:

#include <cstddef>
#include <cctype>
#include <cstring>
#include <ostream>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    char const* str = "TEST";
    char c[2] = { };
    char* cstr = new char[std::strlen(str) + 1]();
    std::size_t i = 0;
    while (str[i])
    {
        c[0] = static_cast<char>(std::tolower(str[i++]));
        std::strcat(cstr, c);
    }
    std::cout << cstr << std::endl;
    delete [] cstr;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This seems overly complex for a simple solution. –  Tyler Ferraro Apr 22 '11 at 21:28
1  
@Tyler Ferraro : The OP's code was overly complex, I simply fixed their bug. The OP didn't ask what a better approach would be, they asked why their code wasn't working. For purposes of edification, it is at least as helpful to explain how/why they were using strcat incorrectly as to take a different (read: "better") approach that doesn't tell them why their code was broken. Downvote not warranted imo. –  ildjarn Apr 22 '11 at 21:31
    
Thanks, this works great –  trev9065 Apr 22 '11 at 21:36

The second argument of strcat is supposed to be a null terminated string, not the address of a single character. strcat isn't appropriate for this use.

int main ()
{
    const char* str="TEST";
    char* cstr = new char[strlen(str) + 1];
    cstr[strlen(str)] = 0;
    for (int i = 0; str[i]; ++i) {
        cstr[i] = tolower(str[i]);
    }
    cout << cstr << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.