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How can I print 0x0a, instead of 0xa using cout?

#include  <iostream>

using std::cout;  
using std::endl;  
using std::hex;

int main()  
{  
    cout << hex << showbase << 10 << endl;  
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly are your requirements. The title says 0x0a, the body of your question says 0x0A. Either way an explicit std::cout << "0x0a" or std::cout << "0x0A" would seem to meet your requirements but I assume that you really want to format a number. How do you want (e.g.) 16, 255, 256, 65536, -1 to be formatted? –  Charles Bailey Apr 23 '11 at 14:24
    
@Charles The question was about how to print the 0 after the x and before the A, or the a, for that matter. As you can verify the first answer is wrong since it still prints 0xa (0xA if uppercase is used). But anyway the question is already marked as answered. –  411165 Apr 23 '11 at 15:17
    
But why the extra 0? Do you always want 0x0 or do you need a minimum length for the string? –  Charles Bailey Apr 23 '11 at 15:20
    
If the hex number is 0xA I want it 0x0A. If the number is 0x123 I want it 0x0123, and so forth, i.e., an even number of hex digits. –  411165 Apr 23 '11 at 15:22
    
I don't think that you've understood what I'm driving at. You've specified exactly how you want 10 to appear, but what about 1 to 9 and 11 to 15? What about 256? Do you want 0x0a because you want a minimum width or because you always want a leading zero? Unless your exact with your specification you may not get the answers that you want. –  Charles Bailey Apr 23 '11 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This works for me in GCC:

#include  <iostream>
#include  <iomanip>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "0x" << setfill('0') << setw(2) << hex << 10 << endl;
}

If you are getting sick and tired of iostream's formatting quirkiness, give Boost.Format a try. It allows good-old-fashioned, printf-style format specifiers, yet it is type-safe.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/format.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::cout << boost::format("0x%02x\n") % 10;
}
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3  
+1 for Boost.Format –  Robᵩ Apr 23 '11 at 14:29
    
+1 thanks for your help –  Doug T. Apr 23 '11 at 15:38

Use setw and setfill from iomanip

#include  <iostream>
#include  <iomanip>

using std::cout;  
using std::endl;  
using std::hex;

int main()
{
    cout << "0x" << setfill('0') << setw(2) << hex << 10 << endl;
}

Personally, the stateful nature of iostreams always annoys me. I think boost format is a better option, so I'd recommended the other answer.

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2  
I get 0xA too. Why is it so damn HARD to get iostream to format things the way you want?? –  Emile Cormier Apr 22 '11 at 21:45
1  
printf("0x%02X\n", 0x0A); –  Svisstack Apr 22 '11 at 21:48
2  
This worked for me: cout << "0x" << setfill('0') << setw(2) << hex << 10 << endl –  Emile Cormier Apr 22 '11 at 21:48
1  
@Doug T.: I took the liberty of editing your answer so that the OP may accept it as the answer that worked. –  Emile Cormier Apr 22 '11 at 21:59
1  
@Charles: Sorry, I forget setiosflags(ios::internal). This works: cout << showbase << setiosflags(ios::internal) << setfill('0') << setw(4) << hex << 10 << endl; Demo: ideone.com/WlusB –  Potatoswatter Apr 23 '11 at 15:15

try this.. you simply prepend zeroes based on magnitude.

cout << hex << "0x" << ((c<16)?"0":"") << (static_cast<unsigned int>(c) & 0xFF) << "h" << endl;

You can easily modify this to work with larger numbers.

cout << hex << "0x";
cout << ((c<16)?"0":"") << ((c<256)?"0":"");
cout << (static_cast<unsigned int>(c) & 0xFFF) << "h" << endl;

Factor is 16 (for one hex-digit):
16, 256, 4096, 65536, 1048576, ..
respective
0x10, 0x100, 0x1000, 0x10000, 0x100000, ..

Therefore you could also write like this..

cout << hex << "0x" << ((c<0x10)?"0":"") << ((c<0x100)?"0":"") << ((c<0x1000)?"0":"") << (static_cast<unsigned int>(c) & 0xFFFF) << "h" << endl;

And so on.. :P

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