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I am still learning sockets and am unclear why this doesn't print out 127.0.0.1. Even if I replace the word localhost with 127.0.0.1 I receive some other ip's which I guess are my router or something. I always thought this should return 127.0.0.1. Here's the output I receive:

hostname: 28.30.0.0
hostname: 28.30.0.0
hostname: 28.30.0.0
hostname: 28.30.0.0
hostname: 16.2.0.0
hostname: 16.2.0.0

Here is the basic code:

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    struct addrinfo* feed_server = NULL;

    getaddrinfo("localhost", NULL, NULL, &feed_server);
    struct addrinfo *res;
    for(res = feed_server; res != NULL; res = res->ai_next)
    {   
        printf("hostname: %s\n", inet_ntoa(*((struct in_addr*)(res->ai_addr))));
    } 

    return 0;
}
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2  
In addition to the actual answer, you shouldn't forget to freeaddrinfo(feed_server); – Philip Apr 22 '11 at 23:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

res->ai_addr is of type struct sockaddr*, not struct in_addr*.

You need to do something like this:

for(res = feed_server; res != NULL; res = res->ai_next)
{
    /* ideally look at the sa_family here to make sure it is AF_INET before casting */
    struct sockaddr_in* saddr = (struct sockaddr_in*)res->ai_addr;
    printf("hostname: %s\n", inet_ntoa(saddr->sin_addr));
} 
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2  
Right diagnosis, but wrong solution. inet_ntoa is deprecated and requires ugly address-family-specific (i.e. IPv4-specific) code to use. Instead, use getnameinfo with NI_NUMERICHOST to convert the address back to a string in numeric form. – R.. Apr 22 '11 at 21:56
1  
Well if you purely use getaddrinfo and getnameinfo, you don't have to care if you got back an IPv6 address. Everything just works. That's the whole beauty of it. – R.. Apr 22 '11 at 22:04
    
@R.. Does it "just work" even if you just use sockaddr_in and not sockaddr_in6? – Horse SMith Nov 15 '14 at 2:11
    
@HorseSMith: If you correctly use the abstraction getaddrinfo and getnameinfo provide, you never have to write struct sockaddr_in or struct sockaddr_in6 in your code at all. – R.. Nov 15 '14 at 2:57
1  
You need to account for the fact that getaddrinfo might return addresses that are not IPv4. Casting to a sockaddr_in unconditionally will give incorrect results in some circumstances. – Matt Jan 21 at 16:50

You should use hints for call of getaddrinfo. Because to resolve "localhost" or any /etc/hosts record hints.af_family must be set to AF_INET.

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{

   struct addrinfo hints;
   memset(&hints, 0, sizeof(struct addrinfo));
   hints.ai_family = AF_INET;
   getaddrinfo("localhost", NULL, &hints, &feed_server);
   struct addrinfo *res;
   for(res = feed_server; res != NULL; res = res->ai_next){   
      struct sockaddr_in* saddr = (struct sockaddr_in*)res->ai_addr;
      printf("hostname: %s\n", inet_ntoa(saddr->sin_addr))
   } 
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is very inaccurate. You can have ipv6 host entries in /etc/hosts and getaddrinfo will resolve them. By default if no hints is supplied like in the question, AF_UNSPEC will be used for the protocol. This is perfectly fine as you will get both IPv4 and IPv6 results back. – Matt Jan 21 at 16:22

There are two problems with the original code:

  1. The ai_addr member points to a sockaddr and not a struct in_addr so casting it like that will always produce incorrect results.
  2. Unless you pass a hints that is not NULL and with the af_family member set to AF_INET, you cannot expect all returned addresses to be IPv4 (struct sockaddr_in type). So you can provide the hints to specify IPv4 or check the af_family member of the resulting addrinfo structs.

One thing I typically see at least on Linux systems is that getaddrinfo for localhost usually returns the IPv6 ::1 address first.

From the addresses being printed I can tell you are running on an OS that includes the sockaddrs length in the struct. For example the definition of struct sockaddr on OS X is:

 struct sockaddr {
      __uint8_t       sa_len;         /* total length */
      sa_family_t     sa_family;      /* [XSI] address family */
      char            sa_data[14];    /* [XSI] addr value (actually larger) */
 };

For both struct sockaddr_in and sockaddr_in6 the very next member after sa_family is the port which is always two bytes. So when you cast either of these structs to a struct in_addr you will get an address that is sa_len.sa_family.0.0 (assuming you don't provide a port to getaddrinfo - if you provide a port the 0.0 will be replaced with the ports byte values).

So gettaddr info is returning you two IPv6 addresses: 28.30.0.0 - sizeof struct sockaddr_in6 = 28 and af_family = 30

and two IPv4 addresses: 16.2.0.0 - sizeof struct sockaddr_in = 16 and af_family = 2

To do this properly you could do what the other answer said and use getnameinfo. However using inet_ntop (not inet_ntoa) can be equally as good.

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h> /* for memset */

int main()
{
   char addr_buf[64];
   struct addrinfo* feed_server = NULL;

   memset(addr_buf, 0, sizeof(addr_buf));

   getaddrinfo("localhost", NULL, NULL, &feed_server);
   struct addrinfo *res;
   for(res = feed_server; res != NULL; res = res->ai_next)
   {   
       if ( res->ai_family == AF_INET )
       {
          inet_ntop(AF_INET, &((struct sockaddr_in *)res->ai_addr)->sin_addr, addr_buf, sizeof(addr_buf));
       }
       else
       {
          inet_ntop(AF_INET6, &((struct sockaddr_in6 *)res->ai_addr)->sin6_addr, addr_buf, sizeof(addr_buf));
       }

       printf("hostname: %s\n", addr_buf); 
   } 

   return 0;
}

```

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