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I need to design a database to store user values : for each user, there is a specific set of columns.

For instance, Jon wants to store values in a table with 2 columns : name, age.

And Paul wants to store values in a 3 columns table : fruit, color, weight.

At this point, I have 2 options.

Option 1 - Store data as text values

I would have a first table 'profiles' with the users' preferences :

+----+---------+--------+-------------+
| id | user_id | label  | type        |
+----+---------+--------+-------------+
|  1 |       1 | name   | VARCHAR(50) |
|  2 |       1 | age    | INT         |
|  3 |       2 | fruit  | VARCHAR(50) |
|  4 |       2 | color  | VARCHAR(50) |
|  5 |       2 | weight | DOUBLE      |
+----+---------+--------+-------------+

And then store the datas as text in another table :

+----+------------+--------+
| id | id_profile | value  |
+----+------------+--------+
|  1 |          1 | Aron   |
|  2 |          2 | 17     |
|  3 |          1 | Vince  |
|  4 |          2 | 27     |
|  5 |          1 | Elena  |
|  6 |          2 | 78     |
|  7 |          3 | Banana |
|  8 |          4 | Yellow |
|  9 |          5 | 124.8  |
+----+------------+--------+

After that, I would programatically create and populate a clean table.

Option 2 - One column per type

On this option, I would have a first table 'profiles2' like that :

+----+---------+--------+------+
| id | user_id | label  | type |
+----+---------+--------+------+
|  1 |       1 | name   |    3 |
|  2 |       1 | age    |    1 |
|  3 |       2 | fruit  |    3 |
|  4 |       2 | color  |    3 |
|  5 |       2 | weight |    2 |
+----+---------+--------+------+

with the type corresponding of a set of type : 1=INT , 2=DOUBLE , 3=VARCHAR(50)

And a data table like that :

+----+-------------+-----------+--------------+---------------+
| id | id_profile2 | int_value | double_value | varchar_value |
+----+-------------+-----------+--------------+---------------+
|  1 |           1 |      NULL |         NULL | Aron          |
|  2 |           2 |        17 |         NULL | NULL          |
|  3 |           1 |      NULL |         NULL | Vince         |
|  4 |           2 |        27 |         NULL | NULL          |
|  5 |           1 |      NULL |         NULL | Elena         |
|  6 |           2 |        78 |         NULL | NULL          |
|  7 |           3 |      NULL |         NULL | Banana        |
|  8 |           4 |      NULL |         NULL | Yellow        |
|  9 |           5 |      NULL |        124.8 | NULL          |
+----+-------------+-----------+--------------+---------------+

Here I have cleaner tables, but still a programmatic trick to implement to get everything in order.

The questions

Have anyone ever face this situation ?

What do you think of my 2 options ?

Is there a better solution, less tricky ?

Tx a lot!

Edit Hi again,

My model had a bug : impossible to retrieve a "line" of information; i.e. the informations in the "values" table are not sortables.

After some wanredings around the EAV model, it showed not suitable because it's not designed to store datas, but specific infos.

Then I ended with this model : Firt table 'labels' :

+----+------------+------+----------+
| id | profile_id | name | datatype |
+----+------------+------+----------+
|  1 |          1 | 1    | Nom      |
|  2 |          1 | 1    | Age      |
|  3 |          2 | 2    | Fruit    |
|  4 |          2 | 2    | Couleur  |
|  5 |          2 | 2    | Poids    |
+----+------------+------+----------+

Then a very simple 'nodes' talbe, just to keep track of the lines of infos :

+----+------------+
| id | profile_id |
+----+------------+
|  1 |          1 |
|  2 |          1 |
|  3 |          2 |
|  4 |          2 |
+----+------------+

and a set of tables corresponding to different datatypes :

+----+---------+----------+--------+
| id | node_id | label_id | value  |
+----+---------+----------+--------+
|  1 |       1 |        1 | John   |
|  2 |       2 |        1 | Doe    |
|  3 |       3 |        3 | Orange |
|  4 |       3 |        4 | Orange |
|  5 |       4 |        3 | Banane |
|  6 |       4 |        4 | Jaune  |
+----+---------+----------+--------+

With this model, queries are ok. Data input is a bit tricky but I will manage with a clean code.

Cheers

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3 Answers 3

Take a look at EAV data models.

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1  
Looking at the question examples, my first feeling was EAV as well. Pro/Con - A proper designed EAV scheme is theoretically infinitely customizable; almost all EAV implementations sacrifice any/all support that a RDBM server can provide, placing constraint and integrity responsibility in the hands of the application. –  David Apr 22 '11 at 22:00
    
@David: Usually the responsibility for constraints and data integrity in an EAV database fall on the shoulders of every casual user. It's not pretty. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Apr 23 '11 at 0:41
1  
@David not to mention what a pain a simple query like how many Banana's are older than 80 is –  Conrad Frix Apr 23 '11 at 6:41
    
EAV reminds me of a daily-wtf I saw where they were so proud about implementing a database in their database. Losing referential integrity is only good until you forget the rules you're trying to enforce (which happens when you either sleep too many times, or hand the project off to another developer. The obvious solution is to never sleep.) –  corsiKa Apr 23 '11 at 7:43
    
Great keyword this EAV. It's indeed more or less what I described as Option 1. The loss of performance and referential integrity should be harmless since I would not have to perform complex requests. –  Vince Apr 23 '11 at 8:35

Option 3: make two different tables.

One table is obviously for people. The other is obviously for fruit. They should be in different tables.

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Yes and no, this would suit for my example, but it's not extensible; I need as many "tables" as users. –  Vince Apr 23 '11 at 8:37
    
I've seen this come up before in other questions, and I can never get a clear answer: why would you need each user to be able to input their own pieces of data in that manner? That, to me, indicates a serious flaw in the design. The schema should dictate what data the users can store, not the other way around. –  corsiKa Apr 23 '11 at 9:13
    
I agree with your point. But I have to build a model where each user can define their own dashboard datas. Paul logs in, he says "I want to track the names and ages of my customers" ; then he inputs the datas. (and so on, Peter wants to track the weight of his sheeps...). –  Vince Apr 23 '11 at 9:33

Why not just have a user table with name and ID, the a userValues table that has key value pairs? that was John can have key "fruit" and value "mango, and another key "tires" and value "goodyear". Bob can have key "coin" and value "penny" and key "age" and value "42". Anyone can have any value they like and you have maximum flexibility. Speed won't be great, and you'll have to cast string to values, but it's always a tradeoff.

Cheers, Daniel

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, can you explain me the difference with option 1 ? –  Vince Apr 23 '11 at 8:39
    
The 2nd table only has two columns, Key and Value, so completely generic. –  Daniel Williams Apr 25 '11 at 18:44

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