Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to create a vector of vectors full of integers. However, I continuously get the errors:

error: expected identifier before numeric constant error: expected ',' or '...' before numeric constant

using namespace std;

class Grid {
  public:

  Grid();

  void display_grid();
  void output_grid();

  private:

  vector<int> row(5, 0);
  vector<vector<int> > puzzle(9, row);
  int rows_;
  int columns_;

};
share|improve this question
2  
It would help if you had some basic knowledge of C++. For example, how to initialize class member data. – Seth Johnson Apr 23 '11 at 1:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot initialize the member variables at the point where you declare them. Use an initialization list in the constructor for that:

Grid::Grid()
  : row(5,0), puzzle(9, row),
    rows_(5), columns_(9)
{
}
share|improve this answer

C++ class definitions are limited in that you cannot initialise members in-line where you declare them. It's a shame, but it's being fixed to some extent in C++0x.

Anyway, you can still provide constructor parameters with the ctor-initializer syntax. You may not have seen it before, but:

struct T {
   T() : x(42) {
      // ...
   }

   int x;
};

is how you initialise a member, when you might have previously tried (and failed) with int x = 42;.

So:

class Grid {
  public:

  Grid();

  void display_grid();
  void output_grid();

  private:

  vector<int> row;
  vector<vector<int> > puzzle;
  int rows_;
  int columns_;
};

Grid::Grid()
  : row(5, 0)
  , puzzle(9, row)
{
  // ...
};

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning C++0x – fredoverflow Apr 23 '11 at 6:46

You can't initialize a member in a class declaration unless it's const static, because in C++ no code is being run/generated when you are declaring a class. You'll have to initialize them in your constructor.

share|improve this answer

You should initialize members in the class constructor, not the declaration. The following doesn't seem to be right in any way:

vector<int> row(5, 0);
vector<vector<int> > puzzle(9, row);

If row and puzzle are functions - the parameters should be types. If they're member variables - initialize them in the class constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
How are they functions? They are objects, and they are being constructed with arguments (or that was the intention). – PreferenceBean Apr 23 '11 at 0:57
    
I know that that was the intention, I'm pointing out that the syntax is wrong. Using parenthesis in definition of a class member is for functions. – littleadv Apr 23 '11 at 5:38

You cannot initialize mutable members as a part of class definition itself. Instead do assign it in in the constructor.

// ....
Grid()
{
     row.resize(5,0) ;
     puzzle.resize(9,row) ;
}
private:
   vector<int> row;
   vector<vector<int> > puzzle ;
// ..
share|improve this answer
    
That's not initialization. – PreferenceBean Apr 23 '11 at 0:57
    
@Tomalak - I am confused between the terms assignment and initialization. What is the correct terminology to use what OP is doing ? I don't think it is assignment either. – Mahesh Apr 23 '11 at 1:01
    
The OP is trying to do initialisation. Your code does not (though the end result is really the same, here) as you call functions on the fully-constructed objects, rather than passing constructor parameters. – PreferenceBean Apr 23 '11 at 1:01
    
@Tomalak - If my answer is confusing to say it as an initialization, I am sorry. – Mahesh Apr 23 '11 at 1:04
    
It's just incorrect to say. :) The approach you demonstrate is still valid, of course. – PreferenceBean Apr 23 '11 at 1:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.