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What could be the best way of getting the matching lines with the line numbers using Ruby's Enumerable#grep method. (as we use -n or --line-number switch with grep command).

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I'd be interested in knowing your use case for this. –  Phrogz Apr 23 '11 at 3:33
    
I'm curious why `grep -n target file_to_search` isn't good enough. It'll be extremely fast and supports all of grep's features. –  the Tin Man Apr 23 '11 at 8:08
    
@the Tin Man: Yeah that's true, but I'd like to have a ruby solution for platform independence. –  intellidiot Apr 24 '11 at 9:16
    
@Phrogz: My use case is i am picking a particular pattern from erb files. –  intellidiot Apr 24 '11 at 9:18
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8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Enumerable#grep doesn't let you do that, at least by default. Instead, I came up with:

text = 'now is the time
for all good men
to come to the aid
of their country'

regex = /aid/

hits = text.lines.with_index(1).inject([]) { |m,i| m << i if (i[0][regex]); m }
hits # => [["to come to the aid\n", 3]]
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+1 as I found this answer is closest to the one I was looking for. I had to change it a bit to make it 1.8.7 compatible. Later I found it'd be great, for my requirement, if the result comes as a hash, having line numbers as keys and lines as values. I'm putting that as an answer for the record. –  intellidiot Apr 24 '11 at 9:46
    
It helps us a lot if you know what you want before writing the question, and ask for that. Your end result would have been trivial to add and then would have been exactly what you were looking for. And, actually, my answer would have been better. –  the Tin Man Apr 24 '11 at 20:14
    
Couldn't agree more the Tin Man. But you know, sometime you refine your idea after walking a good amount of steps towards the solution :) –  intellidiot Apr 25 '11 at 3:34
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maybe something like this:

module Enumerable
  def lgrep(pattern)
    map.with_index.select{|e,| e =~ pattern}
  end
end
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I'm just curious about this |e,| notation you're using. What exactly does this mean? –  maček Apr 23 '11 at 1:35
1  
It throws away the second arguments (it's not needed). If I had omitted it, e would have turned into an array of both args. –  J-_-L Apr 23 '11 at 2:30
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This isn't elegant or efficient, but why not just number the lines before grepping?

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+1 This is a perfectly good, common-sense answer. Don't do it again. :-) –  the Tin Man Apr 23 '11 at 2:04
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You can kludge it in Ruby 1.8.6 like so:

require 'enumerator'
class Array
  def grep_with_index(regex)
    self.enum_for(:each_with_index).select {|x,i| x =~ regex}
  end
end
arr = ['Foo', 'Bar', 'Gah']
arr.grep_with_index(/o/) # => [[0, 'Foo']]
arr.grep_with_index(/a/) # => [[1, 'Bar'], [2, 'Gah']]

Or if you're looking for tips on writing a grep-like utility in Ruby. Something like this should work:

def greplines(filename, regex)
  lineno = 0
  File.open(filename) do |file|
    file.each_line do |line|
      puts "#{lineno += 1}: #{line}" if line =~ regex
    end
  end
end
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>> lines=["one", "two", "tests"]
=> ["one", "two", "tests"]
>> lines.grep(/test/){|x| puts "#{lines.index(x)+1}, #{x}" }
3, tests
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To mash up the Tin Man's and ghostdog74's answers

text = 'now is the time
for all good men
to come to the aid
of their country'

regex = /aid/

text.lines.grep(/aid/){|x| puts "#{text.lines.find_index(x)+1}, #{x}" }
# => 3, to come to the aid
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A modification to the solution given by the Tin Man. This snippet will return a hash having line numbers as keys, and matching lines as values. This one also works in ruby 1.8.7.

text = 'now is the time
for all good men
to come to the aid
of their country'

regex = /aid/


hits = text.lines.each_with_index.inject({}) { |m, i| m.merge!({(i[1]+1) => i[0].chomp}) if (i[0][regex]); m}

hits #=> {3=>"to come to the aid"} 
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Put text in a file

test.log

 now is the time
 for all good men
 to come to the aid
 of their country

Command line (alternative of grep or awk command )

ruby -ne ' puts $_  if $_=~/to the/' test.log

Try this also

ruby -na -e ' puts $F[2] if $_=~/the/' test.log

Similarly

ruby -na -e ' puts $_.split[2] if $_=~/the/' test.log

This is similar to awk command.

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