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I have a console app in which I want to give the user x seconds to respond to the prompt. If no input is made after a certain period of time, program logic should continue. We assume a timeout means empty response.

What is the most straightforward way of approaching this?

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22 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I'm surprised to learn that after 5 years, all of the answers still suffer from one or more of the following problems:

  • A function other than ReadLine is used, causing loss of functionality. (Delete/backspace/up-key for previous input).
  • Function behaves badly when invoked multiple times (spawning multiple threads, many hanging ReadLine's, or otherwise unexpected behavior).
  • Function relies on a busy-wait. Which is a horrible waste since the wait is expected to run anywhere from a number of seconds up to the timeout, which might be multiple minutes. A busy-wait which runs for such an ammount of time is a horrible suck of resources, which is especially bad in a multithreading scenario. If the busy-wait is modified with a sleep this has a negative effect on responsiveness, although I admit that this is probably not a huge problem.

I believe my solution will solve the original problem without suffering from any of the above problems:

class Reader {
  private static Thread inputThread;
  private static AutoResetEvent getInput, gotInput;
  private static string input;

  static Reader() {
    inputThread = new Thread(reader);
    inputThread.IsBackground = true;
    inputThread.Start();
    getInput = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    gotInput = new AutoResetEvent(false);
  }

  private static void reader() {
    while (true) {
      getInput.WaitOne();
      input = Console.ReadLine();
      gotInput.Set();
    }
  }

  public static string ReadLine(int timeOutMillisecs) {
    getInput.Set();
    bool success = gotInput.WaitOne(timeOutMillisecs);
    if (success)
      return input;
    else
      throw new TimeoutException("User did not provide input within the timelimit.");
  }
}

Calling is, of course, very easy:

try {
  Console.WriteLine("Please enter your name within the next 5 seconds.");
  string name = Reader.ReadLine(5000);
} catch (TimeoutException) {
  Console.WriteLine("Sorry, you waited too long.");
} 

So how about those problems of the other solutions I mentioned?

  • As you can see, ReadLine is used, avoiding the first problem.
  • The function behaves properly when invoked multiple times. Regardless of whether a timeout occurs or not, only one background thread will ever be running and only at most one call to ReadLine will ever be active. Calling the function will always result in the latest input, or in a timeout, and the user won't have to hit enter more than once to submit his input.
  • And, obviously, the function does not rely on a busy-wait. Instead it uses proper multithreading techniques to prevent wasting resources.

The only problem that I foresee with this solution is that it is not thread-safe. However, multiple threads can't really ask the user for input at the same time, so synchronization should be happening before making a call to Reader.ReadLine anyway.

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Wow! I expected my answer to be buried somewhere at the bottom of this pile of answers! Thanks for the quick accept! :) –  JSQuareD Aug 20 '13 at 19:46
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string ReadLine(int timeoutms)
{
    ReadLineDelegate d = Console.ReadLine;
    IAsyncResult result = d.BeginInvoke(null, null);
    result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeoutms);//timeout e.g. 15000 for 15 secs
    if (result.IsCompleted)
    {
        string resultstr = d.EndInvoke(result);
        Console.WriteLine("Read: " + resultstr);
        return resultstr;
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Timed out!");
        throw new TimedoutException("Timed Out!");
    }
}

delegate string ReadLineDelegate();
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1  
I don't know why this hasn't been voted up - it works absolutely flawlessly. A lot of the other solutions involve "ReadKey()", which doesn't work properly: it means you lose all the power of ReadLine(), such as pressing the "up" key to get the previously typed command, using backspace and arrow keys, etc. –  Contango Nov 17 '11 at 9:59
3  
@Gravitas: This doesn't work. Well, it works once. But every ReadLine you call sits there waiting for input. If you call it 100 times, it creates 100 threads which don't all go away until you hit Enter 100 times! –  Gabe Dec 19 '11 at 19:17
    
@Gabe you're right. I went back to using Console.ReadKey(). –  Contango Jan 24 '12 at 10:10
    
Beware. This solution appears neat but I ended up with 1000s of uncompleted calls left hanging. So not suitable if called repeatedly. –  shakinfree Dec 3 '12 at 22:09
    
@Gabe, shakinfree: multiple calls was not considered for the solution but just one async call with timeout. I guess it would be confusing to user to have 10 messages printed on console and then enter inputs for them one by one in respective order. Neverthless, for the hanging calls, could you try commenting the TimedoutException line and return null/empty string? –  gp. Dec 10 '12 at 12:16
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Will this approach using Console.KeyAvailable help?

class Sample 
{
    public static void Main() 
    {
    ConsoleKeyInfo cki = new ConsoleKeyInfo();

    do {
        Console.WriteLine("\nPress a key to display; press the 'x' key to quit.");

// Your code could perform some useful task in the following loop. However, 
// for the sake of this example we'll merely pause for a quarter second.

        while (Console.KeyAvailable == false)
            Thread.Sleep(250); // Loop until input is entered.
        cki = Console.ReadKey(true);
        Console.WriteLine("You pressed the '{0}' key.", cki.Key);
        } while(cki.Key != ConsoleKey.X);
    }
}
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This is true, the OP does seem to want a blocking call, although I shudder at the thought a bit... This is probably a better solution. –  GEOCHET Sep 11 '08 at 21:17
    
I am sure you have seen this. Got it from a quick google social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/csharpgeneral/thread/… –  Gulzar Nazim Sep 11 '08 at 21:20
    
I don't see how this "timesout" if the user does nothing. All this would do is possibly keep executing logic in the background until a key is pressed and other logic continues. –  mphair Feb 17 '10 at 16:51
    
True, this needs to be fixed. But it is easy enough to add the timeout to the loop condition. –  Jonathan Allen Aug 17 '13 at 21:36
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One way or another you do need a second thread. You could use asynchronous IO to avoid declaring your own:

  • declare a ManualResetEvent, call it "evt"
  • call System.Console.OpenStandardInput to get the input stream. Specify a callback method that will store its data and set evt.
  • call that stream's BeginRead method to start an asynchronous read operation
  • then enter a timed wait on a ManualResetEvent
  • if the wait times out, then cancel the read

If the read returns data, set the event and your main thread will continue, otherwise you'll continue after the timeout.

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I think you will need to make a secondary thread and poll for a key on the console. I know of no built in way to accomplish this.

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1  
This man speaketh truth. You need a second thread. –  Jarrett Meyer Sep 11 '08 at 21:05
    
Yeah if you have a second thread polling for keys, and your app closes while it's sitting there waiting, that key polling thread'll just sit there, waiting, forever. –  kelton52 Feb 24 '11 at 21:37
    
Actually: either a second thread, or a delegate with "BeginInvoke" (which uses a thread, behind the scenes - see answer from @gp). –  Contango Nov 17 '11 at 14:34
    
@Grav: So a secondary thread... That is what I said. –  GEOCHET Nov 17 '11 at 16:13
    
@kelton52, Will the secondary thread quit if you end the process in Task Manager? –  Arlen Beiler Jun 9 '12 at 0:09
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// Wait for 'Enter' to be pressed or 5 seconds to elapse
using (Stream s = Console.OpenStandardInput())
{
    ManualResetEvent stop_waiting = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    s.BeginRead(new Byte[1], 0, 1, ar => stop_waiting.Set(), null);

    // ...do anything else, or simply...

    stop_waiting.WaitOne(5000);
    // If desired, other threads could also set 'stop_waiting' 
    // Disposing the stream cancels the async read operation. It can be
    // re-opened if needed.
}
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I struggled with this problem for 5 months before I found an solution that works perfectly in an enterprise setting.

The problem with most of the solutions so far is that they rely on something other than Console.ReadLine(), and Console.ReadLine() has a lot of advantages:

  • Support for delete, backspace, arrow keys, etc.
  • The ability to press the "up" key and repeat the last command (this comes in very handy if you implement a background debugging console that gets a lot of use).

My solution is as follows:

  1. Spawn a separate thread to handle the user input using Console.ReadLine().
  2. After the timeout period, unblock Console.ReadLine() by sending an [enter] key into the current console window, using http://inputsimulator.codeplex.com/.

Sample code:

 InputSimulator.SimulateKeyPress(VirtualKeyCode.RETURN);

More information on this technique, including the correct technique to abort a thread that uses Console.ReadLine:

.NET call to send [enter] keystroke into the current process, which is a console app?

How to abort another thread in .NET, when said thread is executing Console.ReadLine?

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Calling Console.ReadLine() in the delegate is bad because if the user doesn't hit 'enter' then that call will never return. The thread executing the delegate will be blocked until the user hits 'enter', with no way to cancel it.

Issuing a sequence of these calls will not behave as you would expect. Consider the following (using the example Console class from above):

System.Console.WriteLine("Enter your first name [John]:");

string firstName = Console.ReadLine(5, "John");

System.Console.WriteLine("Enter your last name [Doe]:");

string lastName = Console.ReadLine(5, "Doe");

The user lets the timeout expire for the first prompt, then enters a value for the second prompt. Both firstName and lastName will contain the default values. When the user hits 'enter', the first ReadLine call will complete, but the code has abandonded that call and essentially discarded the result. The second ReadLine call will continue to block, the timeout will eventually expire and the value returned will again be the default.

BTW- There is a bug in the code above. By calling waitHandle.Close() you close the event out from under the worker thread. If the user hits 'enter' after the timeout expires, the worker thread will attempt to signal the event which throws an ObjectDisposedException. The exception is thrown from the worker thread, and if you haven't setup an unhandled exception handler your process will terminate.

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The term "above" in your post is ambiguous and confusing. If you are referring to another answer, you should make a proper link to that answer. –  bzlm Nov 6 '08 at 10:02
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I may be reading too much into the question, but I am assuming the wait would be similar to the boot menu where it waits 15 seconds unless you press a key. You could either use (1) a blocking function or (2) you could use a thread, an event, and a timer. The event would act as a 'continue' and would block until either the timer expired or a key was pressed.

Pseudo-code for (1) would be:

// Get configurable wait time
TimeSpan waitTime = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15.0);
int configWaitTimeSec;
if (int.TryParse(ConfigManager.AppSetting["DefaultWaitTime"], out configWaitTimeSec))
    waitTime = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(configWaitTimeSec);

bool keyPressed = false;
DateTime expireTime = DateTime.Now + waitTime;

// Timer and key processor
ConsoleKeyInfo cki;
// EDIT: adding a missing ! below
while (!keyPressed && (DateTime.Now < expireTime))
{
    if (Console.KeyAvailable)
    {
        cki = Console.ReadKey(true);
        // TODO: Process key
        keyPressed = true;
    }
    Thread.Sleep(10);
}
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I can't comment on Gulzar's post unfortunately, but here's a fuller example:

            while (Console.KeyAvailable == false)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(250);
                i++;
                if (i > 3)
                    throw new Exception("Timedout waiting for input.");
            }
            input = Console.ReadLine();
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Note you can also use Console.In.Peek() if the console is not visible(?) or the input is directed from a file. –  Jamie Kitson Jun 3 '10 at 16:26
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This worked for me.

ConsoleKeyInfo k = new ConsoleKeyInfo();
Console.WriteLine("Press any key in the next 5 seconds.");
for (int cnt = 5; cnt > 0; cnt--)
  {
    if (Console.KeyAvailable == true)
      {
        k = Console.ReadKey();
        break;
      }
    else
     {
       Console.WriteLine(cnt.ToString());
       System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
     }
 }
Console.WriteLine("The key pressed was " + k.Key);
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EDIT: fixed the problem by having the actual work be done in a separate process and killing that process if it times out. See below for details. Whew!

Just gave this a run and it seemed to work nicely. My coworker had a version which used a Thread object, but I find the BeginInvoke() method of delegate types to be a bit more elegant.

namespace TimedReadLine
{
   public static class Console
   {
      private delegate string ReadLineInvoker();

      public static string ReadLine(int timeout)
      {
         return ReadLine(timeout, null);
      }

      public static string ReadLine(int timeout, string @default)
      {
         using (var process = new System.Diagnostics.Process
         {
            StartInfo =
            {
               FileName = "ReadLine.exe",
               RedirectStandardOutput = true,
               UseShellExecute = false
            }
         })
         {
            process.Start();

            var rli = new ReadLineInvoker(process.StandardOutput.ReadLine);
            var iar = rli.BeginInvoke(null, null);

            if (!iar.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(new System.TimeSpan(0, 0, timeout)))
            {
               process.Kill();
               return @default;
            }

            return rli.EndInvoke(iar);
         }
      }
   }
}

The ReadLine.exe project is a very simple one which has one class which looks like so:

namespace ReadLine
{
   internal static class Program
   {
      private static void Main()
      {
         System.Console.WriteLine(System.Console.ReadLine());
      }
   }
}
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2  
Invoking a separate executable in a new process only to do a timed ReadLine() sounds like massive overkill. You are essentially solving the problem of not being able to Abort a ReadLine()-blocking thread by setting up and tearing down a whole process instead. –  bzlm Nov 6 '08 at 10:17
    
Then tell it to Microsoft, who put us in this position. –  Jesse C. Slicer Nov 6 '08 at 14:53
    
Microsoft didn't put you in that position. Look at some of the other answers that do the same job in a few lines. I think the code above should get some sort of award - but not the sort that you want :) –  Contango Sep 6 '11 at 11:42
1  
No, none of the other answers did exactly what the OP wanted. All of them lose features of the standard input routines or get hung up on the fact that all requests to Console.ReadLine() are blocking and will hold up input on the next request. The accepted answer is fairly close, but still has limitations. –  Jesse C. Slicer Sep 6 '11 at 12:21
    
The answer from @gp is flawless - it uses ReadLine(), but without spawning another process. –  Contango Nov 17 '11 at 10:02
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Simple threading example to solve this

Thread readKeyThread = new Thread(ReadKeyMethod);
static ConsoleKeyInfo cki = null;

void Main()
{
    readKeyThread.Start();
    bool keyEntered = false;
    for(int ii = 0; ii < 10; ii++)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        if(readKeyThread.ThreadState == ThreadState.Stopped)
            keyEntered = true;
    }
    if(keyEntered)
    { //do your stuff for a key entered
    }
}

void ReadKeyMethod()
{
    cki = Console.ReadKey();
}

or a static string up top for getting an entire line.

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Im my case this work fine:

public static ManualResetEvent evtToWait = new ManualResetEvent(false);

private static void ReadDataFromConsole( object state )
{
    Console.WriteLine("Enter \"x\" to exit or wait for 5 seconds.");

    while (Console.ReadKey().KeyChar != 'x')
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("");
        Console.Out.WriteLine("Enter again!");
    }

    evtToWait.Set();
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
        Thread status = new Thread(ReadDataFromConsole);
        status.Start();

        evtToWait = new ManualResetEvent(false);

        evtToWait.WaitOne(5000); // wait for evtToWait.Set() or timeOut

        status.Abort(); // exit anyway
        return;
}
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This is a fuller example of Glen Slayden's solution. I happended to make this when building a test case for another problem. It uses asynchronous I/O and a manual reset event.

public static void Main() {
    bool readInProgress = false;
    System.IAsyncResult result = null;
    var stop_waiting = new System.Threading.ManualResetEvent(false);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[256];
    var s = System.Console.OpenStandardInput();
    while (true) {
        if (!readInProgress) {
            readInProgress = true;
            result = s.BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length
              , ar => stop_waiting.Set(), null);

        }
        bool signaled = true;
        if (!result.IsCompleted) {
            stop_waiting.Reset();
            signaled = stop_waiting.WaitOne(5000);
        }
        else {
            signaled = true;
        }
        if (signaled) {
            readInProgress = false;
            int numBytes = s.EndRead(result);
            string text = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer
              , 0, numBytes);
            System.Console.Out.Write(string.Format(
              "Thank you for typing: {0}", text));
        }
        else {
            System.Console.Out.WriteLine("oy, type something!");
        }
    }
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Another cheap way to get a 2nd thread is to wrap it in a delegate.

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Example implementation of Eric's post above. This particular example was used to read information that was passed to a console app via pipe:

 using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;

namespace PipedInfo
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            StreamReader buffer = ReadPipedInfo();

            Console.WriteLine(buffer.ReadToEnd());
        }

        #region ReadPipedInfo
        public static StreamReader ReadPipedInfo()
        {
            //call with a default value of 5 milliseconds
            return ReadPipedInfo(5);
        }

        public static StreamReader ReadPipedInfo(int waitTimeInMilliseconds)
        {
            //allocate the class we're going to callback to
            ReadPipedInfoCallback callbackClass = new ReadPipedInfoCallback();

            //to indicate read complete or timeout
            AutoResetEvent readCompleteEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

            //open the StdIn so that we can read against it asynchronously
            Stream stdIn = Console.OpenStandardInput();

            //allocate a one-byte buffer, we're going to read off the stream one byte at a time
            byte[] singleByteBuffer = new byte[1];

            //allocate a list of an arbitary size to store the read bytes
            List<byte> byteStorage = new List<byte>(4096);

            IAsyncResult asyncRead = null;
            int readLength = 0; //the bytes we have successfully read

            do
            {
                //perform the read and wait until it finishes, unless it's already finished
                asyncRead = stdIn.BeginRead(singleByteBuffer, 0, singleByteBuffer.Length, new AsyncCallback(callbackClass.ReadCallback), readCompleteEvent);
                if (!asyncRead.CompletedSynchronously)
                    readCompleteEvent.WaitOne(waitTimeInMilliseconds);

                //end the async call, one way or another

                //if our read succeeded we store the byte we read
                if (asyncRead.IsCompleted)
                {
                    readLength = stdIn.EndRead(asyncRead);
                    if (readLength > 0)
                        byteStorage.Add(singleByteBuffer[0]);
                }

            } while (asyncRead.IsCompleted && readLength > 0);
            //we keep reading until we fail or read nothing

            //return results, if we read zero bytes the buffer will return empty
            return new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(byteStorage.ToArray(), 0, byteStorage.Count));
        }

        private class ReadPipedInfoCallback
        {
            public void ReadCallback(IAsyncResult asyncResult)
            {
                //pull the user-defined variable and strobe the event, the read finished successfully
                AutoResetEvent readCompleteEvent = asyncResult.AsyncState as AutoResetEvent;
                readCompleteEvent.Set();
            }
        }
        #endregion ReadPipedInfo
    }
}
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string readline = "?";
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
    delegate
    {
        readline = Console.ReadLine();
    }
);
do
{
    Thread.Sleep(100);
} while (readline == "?");

Note that if you go down the "Console.ReadKey" route, you lose some of the cool features of ReadLine, namely:

  • Support for delete, backspace, arrow keys, etc.
  • The ability to press the "up" key and repeat the last command (this comes in very handy if you implement a background debugging console that gets a lot of use).

To add a timeout, alter the while loop to suit.

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Isn't this nice and short?

if (SpinWait.SpinUntil(() => Console.KeyAvailable, millisecondsTimeout))
{
    ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo = Console.ReadKey();

    // Handle keyInfo value here...
}
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What the heck is SpinWait? –  user396483 Feb 25 at 22:12
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Please don't hate me for adding another solution to the plethora of existing answers! This works for Console.ReadKey(), but could easily be modified to work with ReadLine(), etc.

As the "Console.Read" methods are blocking, it's necessary to "nudge" the StdIn stream to cancel the read.

Calling syntax:

ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo;
bool keyPressed = AsyncConsole.ReadKey(500, out keyInfo);
// where 500 is the timeout

Code:

public class AsyncConsole // not thread safe
{
    private static readonly Lazy<AsyncConsole> Instance =
        new Lazy<AsyncConsole>();

    private bool _keyPressed;
    private ConsoleKeyInfo _keyInfo;

    private bool DoReadKey(
        int millisecondsTimeout,
        out ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo)
    {
        _keyPressed = false;
        _keyInfo = new ConsoleKeyInfo();

        Thread readKeyThread = new Thread(ReadKeyThread);
        readKeyThread.IsBackground = false;
        readKeyThread.Start();

        Thread.Sleep(millisecondsTimeout);

        if (readKeyThread.IsAlive)
        {
            try
            {
                IntPtr stdin = GetStdHandle(StdHandle.StdIn);
                CloseHandle(stdin);
                readKeyThread.Join();
            }
            catch { }
        }

        readKeyThread = null;

        keyInfo = _keyInfo;
        return _keyPressed;
    }

    private void ReadKeyThread()
    {
        try
        {
            _keyInfo = Console.ReadKey();
            _keyPressed = true;
        }
        catch (InvalidOperationException) { }
    }

    public static bool ReadKey(
        int millisecondsTimeout,
        out ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo)
    {
        return Instance.Value.DoReadKey(millisecondsTimeout, out keyInfo);
    }

    private enum StdHandle { StdIn = -10, StdOut = -11, StdErr = -12 };

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern IntPtr GetStdHandle(StdHandle std);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool CloseHandle(IntPtr hdl);
}
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Here is a solution that uses Console.KeyAvailable. These are blocking calls, but it should be fairly trivial to call them asynchronously via the TPL if desired. I used the standard cancellation mechanisms to make it easy to wire in with the Task Asynchronous Pattern and all that good stuff.

public static class ConsoleEx
{
  public static string ReadLine(TimeSpan timeout)
  {
    var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    return ReadLine(timeout, cts.Token);
  }

  public static string ReadLine(TimeSpan timeout, CancellationToken cancellation)
  {
    string line = "";
    DateTime latest = DateTime.UtcNow.Add(timeout);
    do
    {
        cancellation.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        if (Console.KeyAvailable)
        {
            ConsoleKeyInfo cki = Console.ReadKey();
            if (cki.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
            {
                return line;
            }
            else
            {
                line += cki.KeyChar;
            }
        }
        Thread.Sleep(1);
    }
    while (DateTime.UtcNow < latest);
    return null;
  }
}

There are some disadvantages with this.

  • You do not get the standard navigation features that ReadLine provides (up/down arrow scrolling, etc.).
  • This injects '\0' characters into input if a special key is press (F1, PrtScn, etc.). You could easily filter them out by modifying the code though.
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Ended up here because a duplicate question was asked. I came up with the following solution which looks straightforward. I am sure it has some drawbacks I missed.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hit q to continue or wait 10 seconds.");

    Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => loop());

    Console.WriteLine("Started waiting");
    task.Wait(10000);
    Console.WriteLine("Stopped waiting");
}

static void loop()
{
    while (true)
    {
        if ('q' == Console.ReadKey().KeyChar) break;
    }
}
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