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I have a recursive code that removes values from the set at every call. When it returns from the call to the previous recursion, I want that set to be replenished with exactly the same state it had before going into the call. So for eg in the code below:

// initial value of this list is [a,b,c]  
void foo(ArrayList<Character> myList)     
{  
  for(int i=0; i< size;i++)
  {
    myList.remove(i); // Now it becomes [b,c]  
    foo(myList);  
    /* QUESTION: at this point how do i retrieve the value [b,c] -- because it goes into successive recursive calls I'm unable to get this value back!!*/  
  }  
}
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It's not safe to modify a list while iterating through it. –  z7sg Ѫ Apr 23 '11 at 1:46
    
You can't "retrieve" those values, they are gone after you remove them. What are you trying to accomplish overall? You don't need recursion to repeatedly remove the first element of a list, which is all this is doing, and you don't seem to have any kind of end case. Eventually this code will just delete every element in the list and return. –  Carlos Daniel Gadea Omelchenko Apr 23 '11 at 1:47
    
@Carlos eventually it will try to remove elements of the list that have already been removed. –  z7sg Ѫ Apr 23 '11 at 1:48
    
You're right, I missed the fact that size would remain the same in this case. –  Carlos Daniel Gadea Omelchenko Apr 23 '11 at 1:58

3 Answers 3

Pass a copy of myList to foo in the recursive call:

// initial value of this list is [a,b,c]  
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
static void foo(ArrayList<Character> myList)     
{  
  for(int i=0; i< myList.size();i++)
  {
    myList.remove(i); // Now it becomes [b,c]  
    foo((ArrayList<Character>)myList.clone());
  }  
}
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In general, you don't.

To preserve something you'd need to make a copy of it before the recursive call:

void foo(ArrayList<Character> myList)     
{  
  for(int i=0; i< size;i++)
  {
    myList.remove(i); // Now it becomes [b,c]  
    ArrayList<Character> lastList = new ArrayList<Character>(myList);
    foo(myList);  
    /* QUESTION: at this point how do i retrieve the value [b,c] -- because it goes into successive recursive calls I'm unable to get this value back!!*/
    // Answer: you now have a copy of the list prior to the recursive call in lastList  
  }  
}
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This is how I'd do it recursively:

void foo(List<Character> list){
   if(list.size()>0){ //recursion condition
     list.remove(0);
     foo(list);
   }
}

But you seem to be interested in having access to the original list before any recursion. So you will be forced to keep the original parameter list unchanged and pass it as such to every recursion along with another list containing the progress in your calculations or processing over the original input.

List<Character> foo(List<Character> source, List<Character> result){
  if(result == null){ // only on first call
     result = new ArrayList<Character>(source); //accumulator copy
  }

  //here you could do any comparisons you want
  
  if(!result.isEmpty()){ //recursion condition
    result.remove(0);
    return foo(source, result);
   }
   return result;
}

This is how I'd use it

List<Character> letters = Arrays.asList('a', 'b', 'c');
List<Character> result = foo(letters, null);

I assume the result will always be an empty list if we follow you original example. I did all this just in paper, so I have not tested it in code. By I hope the idea is clear enough.

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