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I'm trying to understand super(). From the looks of it, both child classes can be created just fine. I'm curious as to what difference there actually is in this code:

class Base(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Base created"

class ChildA(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        Base.__init__(self)

class ChildB(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        super(ChildB, self).__init__()

print ChildA(),ChildB()
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111  
Where possible, please use UpperCase Names for Classes. It's easier for other Python folks to read. –  S.Lott Feb 23 '09 at 0:39
7  
This post might be helpful to you as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/222877/how-to-use-super –  bernie Feb 23 '09 at 0:45
8  
Ouch, reading that article made me want to stay far, far away from super(). –  mizipzor Feb 23 '09 at 0:54
202  
So many votes on the request of major camel case class names yet no one has edited my question? This is StackOverflow people, edit away! –  mizipzor Nov 4 '10 at 22:36
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5 Answers 5

up vote 432 down vote accepted

Super lets you avoid referring to the base class explicitly, which can be nice. But the main advantage comes with multiple inheritance, where all sorts of fun stuff can happen. See the standard docs on super if you haven't already.

Note that the syntax changed in Python 3.0: you can just say super().__init__() instead of super(ChildB, self).__init__() which IMO is quite a bit nicer.

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23  
I agree. It means that not only do you not have to mention the parent class's name, but you don't have to mention the current class's name. –  Devin Jeanpierre Feb 23 '09 at 1:06
15  
The new syntax is more clean than the previous one. It looks more like Java now. –  Tarik Nov 15 '11 at 18:46
31  
@Braveyard I can't tell if you're serious or a comedic genius. –  Devin Jeanpierre Apr 17 '12 at 6:27
10  
Now I'll never know what Braveyard said, @DevinJeanpierre, and I'll always wonder...thanks. –  Aerovistae Jan 19 at 0:55
18  
Braveyard == Tarik –  mtm Mar 18 at 18:27
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Super has no side effects

Base = ChildB

Base()

works as expected

Base = ChildA

Base()

gets into infinite recursion.

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Just a heads up... with Python 2.7, and I believe ever since super() was introduced in version 2.2, you can only call super() if one of the parents inherit from a class that eventually inherits object (new-style classes).

Personally, as for python 2.7 code, I'm going to continue using BaseClassName.__init__(self, args) until I actually get the advantage of using super().

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1  
very good point. IF you don't clearly mention: class Base(object): then you will get error like that: "TypeError: must be type, not classobj" –  andi Jul 19 '13 at 11:38
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There isn't, really. super() looks at the next class in the MRO (method resolution order, accessed with cls.__mro__) to call the methods. Just calling the base __init__ calls the base __init__. As it happens, the MRO has exactly one item-- the base. So you're really doing the exact same thing, but in a nicer way with super() (particularly if you get into multiple inheritance later).

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2  
I see. Could you elaborate a little as to why its nicer to use super() with multiple inheritance? To me, the base.__init__(self) is shorter (cleaner). If I had two baseclasses, it would be two of those lines, or two super() lines. Or did I misunderstand what you meant by "nicer"? –  mizipzor Feb 23 '09 at 0:40
5  
Actually, it would be one super() line. When you have multiple inheritance, the MRO is still flat. So the first super().__init__ call calls the next class's init, which then calls the next, and so on. You should really check out some docs on it. –  Devin Jeanpierre Feb 23 '09 at 0:45
    
The child class MRO contains object too - a class's MRO is visible in the mro class variable. –  James Brady Feb 23 '09 at 1:24
    
Also note that classic classes (pre 2.2) don't support super - you have to explicitly refer to base classes. –  James Brady Feb 23 '09 at 1:26
    
"The child class MRO contains object too - a class's MRO is visible in the mro class variable." That is a big oops. Whoops. –  Devin Jeanpierre Feb 23 '09 at 4:14
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It's been noted that in Python 3.0+ you can use

super().__init__()

to make your call, which is concise and does not require you to reference the parent OR class names explicitly, which can be handy. I just want to add that for Python 2.7 or under, you can achieve the same name-insensitive approach by writing self.__class__ instead of the class name, i.e.

super(self.__class__, self).__init__()

This unfortunately does not necessarily work if you want to inherit the constructor from the superclass. For example:

class Polygon(object):
    def __init__(self, id):
        self.id = id

class Rectangle(Polygon):
    def __init__(self, id, width, height):
        super(self.__class__, self).__init__(id)
        self.shape = (width, height)

class Square(Rectangle):
    pass

Here I have a class Square, which is a sub-class of Rectangle. Say I don't want to write a separate constructor for Square because the constructor for Rectangle is good enough, but for whatever reason I want to implement a Square so I can reimplement some other method.

When I create a Square using mSquare = Square('a', 10,10), Python calls the constructor for Rectangle because I haven't given Square its own constructor. However, in the constructor for Rectangle, the call super(self.__class__,self) is going to return the superclass of mSquare, so it calls the constructor for Rectangle again. This is how the infinite loop happens, as was mentioned by @S_C. In this case, when I run super(...).__init__() I am calling the constructor for Rectangle but since I give it no arguments, I will get an error.

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super(self.__class__, self).__init__() does not work if you subclass again without providing a new __init__. Then you have an infinite recursion. –  glglgl Mar 31 at 7:21
    
Not necessarily. In this example it produces an error because Rectangle only gives one argument. You are right in general. –  AnjoMan Apr 16 at 22:17
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protected by thefourtheye Jan 29 at 11:46

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