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Which of the following would you go with? And based on object oriented programming which one is the best practice?

A

Class Note
{
    //Some properties, etc
    public static Note getNoteFromServer();
    public void UpdateNoteOnServer();
}

B

Class Note
{
    //Some properties, etc
}

Class NoteManager
{
    public static Note getNoteFromServer();
    public static UpdateNoteOnServer(Note);
}
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thanks for all the answers –  aryaxt Apr 30 '11 at 5:04

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would say option B. In that way you separate concerns: you have a Note that can be reused anywhere (and not necessarily on a networked application), and you have a manager class that only cares with server communication.

You may also think on implement logic for multiple servers. For example, you may want to comunicate with data formats like JSON or XML. You may implement an interface (example, interface INoteManager) and then implement two classes with servers for each of the data types I mentioned (example, NoteManagerXml and NoteManagerJson).

The main point on this question is sepration of concerns. Hope I've helped! :)

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To take a different viewpoint from my other answer, I'd suggest that your division into Note/NoteManager is the wrong one - not because Note has anything wrong with it, but because the term Manager is a bit of a code smell because it's very generic, inviting the use of the class as a general dumping ground.

If the class is responsible for note persistence, call it NoteRepository.

If it's responsible for validating the content of a single note, move the logic onto the Note.

If it's responsible for creating notes, providing a number of convenience methods for easily creating notes, call it NoteFactory.

And if it's responsible for all of the above, split it into separate pieces because it's doing too much.

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That's a pretty opinion based question you're asking there.

You're essentially asking (if I understand correctly) whether it is better to have a Class which contains only properties and another class to manage that object (Example B) or to have a class which does everything (Example A).

It really depends. If we're planning on using a MVC kind of framework, Example B would fit better, with Note being your Model, and NoteManager being the controller.

Personally, I would go with a hybrid of A and B, where NoteManager is handling controller actions, but the Model still has methods of its own to do things like managing a singleton instance. So maybe something like this?

Class Note
{
    //Some properties, etc
    public static Note getInstance(noteIdentifier);

    public void saveNote();
}

Class NoteManager
{
    // This handles view validation and calls Note.saveNote();
    public static UpdateNoteOnServer(Note);
}
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I think A is better, for 1 reason:

It implements the Object Oriented paradigm to the letter.

The problem i see with B is that a static method that receives an instance of the same class sounds redundant to me because, why would you use a static method to apply behaviour to an instance of the same class? The whole idea behind classes and instances is that Classes are the frame and instances cookies, if you need different cookies, modify your frame and get new ones.

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It seems to depend on how its going to be used in your program. If Note is the only class or is the parent class for derived classes then there is no point and having a "Manager", Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS). However if the Manager has to deal with other classes via Interfaces then I can see having a seperate class.

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As per my experience best practice is , as long as things are separated DRY is best practice. you can extends note to notemanager

Class Note
{
    //Some properties, etc
}

Class NoteManager 
{
    public static Note getNoteFromServer();
    public static UpdateNoteOnServer(Note);
}
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I'd choose B, unless you want to end up like poor ol' PHP:

get_note_from_server_and_print_the_response($note, 'PHP, why must you be so disorganized?')

But seriously, it may seem intuitive to do A at the moment, but you'll eventually split A up, as those server operations will require more and more related functions, until you have a mammoth Note class which contains every function in your program...

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2  
That's not really fair, there is no reason you cannot write good, clean, object-oriented code in PHP. Just because most people only write procedural code doesn't mean that the language can't handle it. ;) Edit: PS, have you looked at how Objective-C names things? (It's something along the lines of your example). –  Cthos Apr 23 '11 at 2:32
    
I'm just hating on PHP, no worries ;) I grew up with procedural code, but OOP made it much cleaner. That's why I code Python, as it's clean and not like PHP (or Objective C, which is why I can't make iPhone apps...). –  Blender Apr 23 '11 at 2:41
    
@Blender: Python is actually my favorite language to work in, nice and shiny! That said I do also like PHP, because it can do a lot of things well (with the added bonus of letting you do things poorly!). –  Cthos Apr 23 '11 at 2:43
    
Don't get me wrong, I don't hate PHP; my first web applications were coded in it. I wrote (and lost) my first web forum framework in completely procedural PHP. No classes, anywhere. It was fun, but it got hard to navigate once I started making the project bigger. PHP is capable of OOP, it's just that it's not very widely used because of PHP's massive function database. –  Blender Apr 23 '11 at 2:47
    
@Blender: Good points all around, I did the same thing, albeit on a different application. I've seen both sides of the fence here. You have people like Zend putting together a very nice framework, but you also have people who just churn out procedural code and php makes it very easy for you to do that. But still there's no reason you can't build a nice OO application in PHP, and I think it works out pretty well if you do. Though, I didn't think you hated PHP in the first place, I just thought I'd chime in and give ya a hard time. –  Cthos Apr 23 '11 at 2:51

"It Depends"

One of the things it depends upon is the language of implementation.

If you are working in C# or Java, then you'll likely want to go with the Note/NoteManager approach as this gives you the most flexiblity of implementation - because static members in those languages a kind of second class citizens.

To illustrate, in Delphi's original Object Pascal lanaguage, methods and properties that could be accessed without an instance were known as class members, not static members, and they could be virtual, and therefore overridden in descendent classes.

If you're working with a language that provides features like "virtual class (static) members" and a few others, then you might want to merge Note/NoteManager together.

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I am writing it in objective c. So It'll be "class methods" –  aryaxt Apr 23 '11 at 2:44

I would go with "B" Reason why is that you may require "Note" to be used with another type of Controller class, like what you have done for NoteManager. Also gives you the ability to dissociate your Data Objects or DTO's or Model away from your actual controller classes.

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C

Class Note
{
    //Some properties, etc
    public static Note LoadFrom(Whatever);
    public void SaveTo(Whatever);
}
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What do you mean by "C"? –  lpapp Jan 11 at 0:23

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