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I have an if statement:

if(firstString == "no" && secondString == "no" && thirdString == "no"){
    // Do stuff here
}

Is there a prettier way to format this? Using false instead of "no" is not an option, since the data I'm checking is from an AJAX request and I don't control its output. Otherwise I'd write it this way:

if(!firstString && !secondString && !thirdString){
    // Do stuff here
}

Thanks

UPDATE:

I know this is totally ridiculous, but it occurred to me that this might actually be the shortest way:

if(firstString + secondString + thirdString == "nonono"){
    // Do stuff here
}
share|improve this question
    
Is the number of strings known in advance, or is it akin to an array that might contain any number of strings? –  Karl Nicoll Apr 23 '11 at 3:04
    
It's known in advance. –  Kevin Ennis Apr 23 '11 at 3:10
1  
Short answer: no, there isn't a great way to simplify that. –  Matt Ball Apr 23 '11 at 3:10
    
Thanks for the help. This obviously isn't a big deal, but I always like to try to find ways to make things a little simpler/nicer if I can. –  Kevin Ennis Apr 23 '11 at 3:13
    
@kennis: You see that your shortest way accepts also "non" + "" + "ono", right? –  maaartinus Sep 25 '12 at 1:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given that the number of strings is known in advance, then you have 2 options as far as I can see..

  1. Leave it as it is. The if statement isn't hard to read, and any alternate formats will either be as complicated or more complicated.

  2. convert the strings to booleans when you retrieve the data from the AJAX request, so that you're storing TRUE or FALSE instead of "yes" and "no". That would allow you to use a your preferred if statement format, and might be more efficient than many string comparisons if you do a lot of them.

In the end, which you do is up to you, but personally I think it would be better to just stick with what you've got. Don't worry about formatting an if statement, it's pretty obvious what it does, and in my opinion doesn't need to change.

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Thanks for the help. –  Kevin Ennis Apr 23 '11 at 3:20

If( "no" == firstString && firstString == secondString && secondString == thirdString )

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It was a little difficult to determine exactly what you are evaluating to true or false, but this can be tweaked a tad to get what you're looking for.

var checkStrings = function() {
    var no = "no",
        args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);

    for (var i = 0, len = args.length; i < len; i++) {
        if (args[i] !== no) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
};

if (checkStrings(firstString, secondString, thirdString)) {
    // Do stuff here    
}
share|improve this answer

Sorry, wasn't thinking--this is if you were checking whether ANY were 'no'

if ($.inArray('no', [firstString, secondString, thirdString]) >= 0) {
    // Do something if the value is 'no'
}

UPDATED ANSWER

Unfortunately, jQuery doesn't have the reduce() function (another Array extra introduced in JS 1.6, but not available in older browsers) which would do the trick nicely.

Here's one way to check if all are 'no':

var found = true;
$.each([firstString, secondString, thirdString], function (i, str) {
    if (str !== 'no') {
        found = false;
    }
});

It may seem uglier, but it should be shorter if you have a lot more strings to check.

If you want it wrapped in a function you could do:

function allTrue (arr, checkStr) {
    var found = true;
    $.each(arr, function (i, str) {
        if (str !== checkStr) {
            found = false;
        }
    });
    return found;
}
if (allTrue([firstString, secondString, thirdString], 'no')) {
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
An equivalent answer was already posted and deleted. This doesn't do the same thing as the original code. –  Matt Ball Apr 23 '11 at 3:15
    
This will return true if any of the variables is "no". He wants all 3 to be. –  thatjuan Apr 23 '11 at 3:16
function F(var value){
    return value === "no";
}

if(F(firstString) && F(secondString) && F(thirdString)){
    // Do stuff here
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you negate the equality in the function, and negate again right outside of the function? –  Matt Ball Apr 23 '11 at 3:11
    
just because it seems more intuitive to me than having a function like IsFalse(value) –  Nico Apr 23 '11 at 3:33
    
will this be an overhead as three functions will be called instead instead of three comparisons? –  Anji Apr 23 '11 at 4:19
    
the functions are essentially just a comparison, so the "extra overhead" this could produce is neglectable –  Nico Apr 23 '11 at 4:26

Another option, using jQuery.unique:

var uniques = $.unique([firstString, secondString, thirdString]);
if (uniques.length === 1 && uniques[0] === "no") {
  // do stuff
}
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