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This one will take some explaining. What I've done is create a specific custom message queue in SQL Server 2005. I have a table with messages that contain timestamps for both acknowledgment and completion. The stored procedure that callers execute to obtain the next message in their queue also acknowledges the message. So far so good. Well, if the system is experiencing a massive amount of transactions (thousands per minute), isn't it possible for a message to be acknowledged by another execution of the stored procedure while another is prepared to so itself? Let me help by showing my SQL code in the stored proc:

--Grab the next message id
declare @MessageId uniqueidentifier
set @MessageId = (select top(1) ActionMessageId from UnacknowledgedDemands);

--Acknowledge the message
update ActionMessages
set AcknowledgedTime = getdate()
where ActionMessageId = @MessageId

--Select the entire message
...
...

In the above code, couldn't another stored procedure running at the same time obtain the same id and attempt to acknowledge it at the same time? Could I (or should I) implement some sort of locking to prevent another stored proc from acknowledging messages that another stored proc is querying?

Wow, did any of this even make sense? It's a bit difficult to put to words...

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you might want to re-tag this so that "bestpractice" changes to the more commonly used "best-practices" – martinatime Sep 14 '08 at 15:55
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Something like this

--Grab the next message id
begin tran
declare @MessageId uniqueidentifier
select top 1 @MessageId =   ActionMessageId from UnacknowledgedDemands with(holdlock, updlock);

--Acknowledge the message
update ActionMessages
set AcknowledgedTime = getdate()
where ActionMessageId = @MessageId

-- some error checking
commit tran

--Select the entire message
...
...
share|improve this answer

This seems like the kind of situation where OUTPUT can be useful:

-- Acknowledge and grab the next message
declare @message table (
    -- ...your `ActionMessages` columns here...
)
update ActionMessages
set    AcknowledgedTime = getdate()
output INSERTED.* into @message
where  ActionMessageId in (select top(1) ActionMessageId from UnacknowledgedDemands)
  and  AcknowledgedTime is null

-- Use the data in @message, which will have zero or one rows assuming
-- `ActionMessageId` uniquely identifies a row (strongly implied in your question)
...
...

There, we update and grab the row in the same operation, which tells the query optimizer exactly what we're doing, allowing it to choose the most granular lock it can and maintain it for the briefest possible time. (Although the column prefix is INSERTED, OUTPUT is like triggers, expressed in terms of the UPDATE being like deleting the row and inserting the new one.)

I'd need more information about your ActionMessages and UnacknowledgedDemands tables (views/TVFs/whatever), not to mention a greater knowledge of SQL Server's automatic locking, to say whether that and AcknowledgedTime is null clause is necessary. It's there to defend against a race condition between the sub-select and the update. I'm certain it wouldn't be necessary if we were selecting from ActionMessages itself (e.g., where AcknowledgedTime is null with a top on the update, instead of the sub-select on UnacknowledgedDemands). I expect even if it's unnecessary, it's harmless.

Note that OUTPUT is in SQL Server 2005 and above. That's what you said you were using, but if compatibility with geriatric SQL Server 2000 installs were required, you'd want to go another way.

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(Quite late to the party, but I saw no one had mentioned it, so...) – T.J. Crowder Jul 19 '11 at 11:25

@Kilhoffer:

The whole SQL batch is parsed before execution, so SQL knows that you're going to do an update to the table as well as select from it.

Edit: Also, SQL will not necessarily lock the whole table - it could just lock the necessary rows. See here for an overview of locking in SQL server.

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I disagree with that. Parsing doesn't have anything to do with it. If it did, SQL run via EXECUTE would not be transaction-safe. – Euro Micelli Sep 11 '08 at 21:17
    
But there's no EXECUTE here. Good point though - how does SQL know what to lock when running arbitrary SQL via execute? – Blorgbeard Sep 11 '08 at 21:48
    
SQL server decides what to lock, and whether to keep the locks or release them, as it happens (as it runs each statement in the transaction), NOT at parse time. Hence there is no difference between EXEC calls and a normal batch. The only difference would be in the choice of query plan (whether to use a cached one or not). – Tao Jul 19 '11 at 11:39

Instead of explicit locking, which is often escalated by SQL Server to higher granularity than desired, why not just try this approach:

declare @MessageId uniqueidentifier
select top 1 @MessageId = ActionMessageId from UnacknowledgedDemands

update ActionMessages
  set AcknowledgedTime = getdate()
  where ActionMessageId = @MessageId and AcknowledgedTime is null

if @@rowcount > 0
  /* acknoweldge succeeded */
else
  /* concurrent query acknowledged message before us,
     go back and try another one */

The less you lock - the higher concurrency you have.

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Should you really be processing things one-by-one? Shouldn't you just have SQL Server acknowledge all unacknowledged messages with todays date and return them? (all also in a transaction of course)

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Isnt that what I'm doing? SQL Server is acknowledging the messages on behalf of the caller and returning them. – Kilhoffer Sep 11 '08 at 21:24
    
No I meant something like this (untested): BEGIN TRANSACTION SELECT * FROM UnacknowledgedDemands; UPDATE ActionMessages SET AcknowledgetTime = getdate() WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM UnacknowledgedDemands WHERE ActionMessages.ActionMessageId = UnacknowledgedDemands.ActionMessageId) COMMIT TRANSACTION – rpetrich Sep 11 '08 at 21:42

Read more about SQL Server Select Locking here and here. SQL Server has the ability to invoke a table lock on a select. Nothing will happen to the table during the transaction. When the transaction completes, any inserts or updates will then resolve themselves.

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1  
So is this to say that simply wrapping the above code in a transaction, SQL Server does in fact implement select locking as described in the above links? – Kilhoffer Sep 11 '08 at 21:22

You want to wrap your code in a transaction, then SQL server will handle locking the appropriate rows or tables.

begin transaction

--Grab the next message id
declare @MessageId uniqueidentifier
set @MessageId = (select top(1) ActionMessageId from UnacknowledgedDemands);

--Acknowledge the message
update ActionMessages
set AcknowledgedTime = getdate()
where ActionMessageId = @MessageId

commit transaction

--Select the entire message
...
share|improve this answer
    
Would it were that simple... whether a (shared) lock is held by the first statement will depend on the transaction isolation level, and best case (if the isolation level is such that the shared locks are held), then that code will lead to deadlocks as two different connections get the same message and both try to update it (each one prevented from doing so by the other one's lock). – Tao Jul 19 '11 at 11:37

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