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I am trying to define some classes in Ruby that have an inheritance hierarchy, but I want to use one of the methods in the base class in the derived class. The twist is that I don't want to call the exact method I'm in, I want to call a different one. The following doesn't work, but it's what I want to do (basically).

class A
    def foo
        puts 'A::foo'
    end
end

class B < A
    def foo
        puts 'B::foo'
    end
    def bar
        super.foo
    end
end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Probably, this is what you want?

class A
  def foo
    puts 'A::foo'
  end
end

class B < A
  alias bar :foo
  def foo
    puts 'B::foo'
  end
end

B.new.foo # => B::foo
B.new.bar # => A::foo
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, hey. That's really handy. So it's alias #{new} :#{old}? –  Kyle Apr 23 '11 at 6:28
1  
Right. The crucial thing is that, alias is evaluated on the fly. So if you put alias after the definition of B#foo, it will not work. It will become B#foo. –  sawa Apr 23 '11 at 6:29

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