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I would like to have a better understanding of how the components of Android's (2D) Canvas drawing pipeline fit together.

For example, how do XferMode, Shader, MaskFilter and ColorFilter interact? The reference docs for these classes are pretty sparse and the docs for Canvas and Paint don't really add any useful explanation.

It's also not entirely clear to me how drawing operations that have intrinsic colors (eg: drawBitmap, versus the "vector" primitives like drawRect) fit into all of this -- do they always ignore the Paint's color and use use their intrinsic color instead?

I was also surprised by the fact that one can do something like this:

Paint eraser = new Paint();
eraser.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(PorterDuff.Mode.CLEAR));
canvas.drawOval(rectF, eraser);

This erases an oval. Before I noticed this my mental-model was that drawing to a canvas (conceptually) draws to a separate "layer" and then that layer is composed with the Canvas's Bitmap using the Paint's transfer mode. If it were as simple as that then the above code would erase the entire Bitmap (within the clipping region) as CLEAR always sets the color (and alpha) to 0 regardless of the source's alpha. So this implies that there's an additional sort of masking going on to constrain the erasing to an oval.

I did find the API demos but each demo works "in a vacuum" and doesn't show how the thing it focusses on (eg: XferModes) interacts with other stuff (eg: ColorFilters).

With enough time and effort I could empirically figure out how these pieces relate or go decipher the source, but I'm hoping that someone else has already worked this out, or better yet that there's some actual documentation of the pipeline/drawing-model that I missed.

This question was inspired by seeing the code in this answer to another SO question.

Update

While looking around for some documentation it occurred to me that since much the stuff I'm interested in here seems to be a pretty thin veneer on top of skia, maybe there's some skia documentation that would be helpful. The best thing I could find is the documentation for SkPaint which says:

There are 6 types of effects that can be assigned to a paint:

  • SkPathEffect - modifications to the geometry (path) before it generates an alpha mask (e.g. dashing)
  • SkRasterizer - composing custom mask layers (e.g. shadows)
  • SkMaskFilter - modifications to the alpha mask before it is colorized and drawn (e.g. blur, emboss)
  • SkShader - e.g. gradients (linear, radial, sweep), bitmap patterns (clamp, repeat, mirror)
  • SkColorFilter - modify the source color(s) before applying the xfermode (e.g. color matrix)
  • SkXfermode - e.g. porter-duff transfermodes, blend modes

It isn't stated explicitly, but I'm guessing that the order of the effects here is the order they appear in the pipeline.

share|improve this question
    
They are best understood as mathematical functions taking (alpha, color) tuples from 1 or 2 source images, and outputting one tuple. hi-android.info/doc/android/graphics/PorterDuff.Mode.html (Not posting as an answer because I have never used Skia; just based on web search results) –  rwong Apr 30 '11 at 5:14
    
@rwong: That's a fine explanation of PorterDuff.Mode, but it doesn't really explain the overall pipeline. See the part of my question about PorterDuff.Mode.CLEAR and drawOval, for example. CLEAR is defined as always outputting 0 to both alpha and the color channels regardless of the inputs, so applying CLEAR should wipe the entire destination unless there is some further masking restricting the application of the mathematical function clear(src, dst) = [0,0]. –  Laurence Gonsalves Apr 30 '11 at 7:30
    
why are you assuming that there's extra masking? The oval itself is the mask. The software renderer does not bother blending pixels outside of the shape you are trying to draw. Your explanation would only work with a bitmap. –  Romain Guy May 1 '11 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Like Romain Guy said, "This question is difficult to answer on StackOverflow". There wasn't really any complete documentation, and complete documentation would be kind of large to include here.

I ended up reading through the source and doing a bunch of experiments. I took notes along the way, and ended up turning them into a document which you can see here:

as well as this diagram:

It's "unofficial", obviously, so the normal caveats apply.

Based on the above, here are answers to some of the "sub-questions":

It's also not entirely clear to me how drawing operations that have intrinsic colors (eg: drawBitmap, versus the "vector" primitives like drawRect) fit into all of this -- do they always ignore the Paint's color and use use their intrinsic color instead?

The "source colors" come from the Shader. In drawBitmap the Shader is temporarily replaced by a BitmapShader if a non-ALPHA_8 Bitmap is used. In other cases, if no Shader is specified a Shader that just generates a solid color, the Paint's color, is used.

I was also surprised by the fact that one can do something like this:

Paint eraser = new Paint();
eraser.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(PorterDuff.Mode.CLEAR));
canvas.drawOval(rectF, eraser);

This erases an oval. Before I noticed this my mental-model was that drawing to a canvas (conceptually) draws to a separate "layer" and then that layer is composed with the Canvas's Bitmap using the Paint's transfer mode. If it were as simple as that then the above code would erase the entire Bitmap (within the clipping region) as CLEAR always sets the color (and alpha) to 0 regardless of the source's alpha. So this implies that there's an additional sort of masking going on to constrain the erasing to an oval.

The XferMode applies to the "source colors" (from the Shader) and the "destination colors" (from the Canvas's Bitmap). The result is then blended with the destination using the mask computed in Rasterization. See the Transfer phase in the above document for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Error 403 - Forbidden You tried to access a document for which you don't have privileges. on your link –  Aleadam May 9 '11 at 22:03
    
@Aleadam Oops! Thanks. Should be fixed now. –  Laurence Gonsalves May 9 '11 at 22:34
    
@Laurence nice work! It will take a long time for me to go through all that info. –  Aleadam May 9 '11 at 23:08
    
The shading part of your diagram is a bit confusing. It seems like the Shader would generate an image that is then processed through the ColorFilter before being sent to the Xfermode. This is not what happens when when your Shader is a linear gradient for instance (no "image" is generated.) Your explanation on your website makes it much clearer (a Shader is a function f(x,y) that returns a color.) –  Romain Guy May 13 '11 at 7:17
    
You mention two possible bugs on your website. The first one is not a bug, this is a guaranteed behavior. The second one is indeed intriguing and I would say it's a bug. I would have to check with the original author of Skia to make sure. –  Romain Guy May 13 '11 at 7:27

This question is difficult to answer on StackOverflow. Before I get started however, note that shapes (drawRect() for instance) do NOT have an intrinsic color. The color information always comes from the Paint object.

This erases an oval. Before I noticed this my mental-model was that drawing to a canvas (conceptually) draws to a separate "layer" and then that layer is composed with the Canvas's Bitmap using the Paint's transfer mode. If it were as simple as that then the above code would erase the entire Bitmap (within the clipping region) as CLEAR always sets the color (and alpha) to 0 regardless of the source's alpha. So this implies that there's an additional sort of masking going on to constrain the erasing to an oval.

Your model is a bit off. The oval is not drawn into a separate layer (unless you call Canvas.saveLayer()), it is drawn directly onto the Canvas' backing bitmap. The Paint's transfer mode is applied to every pixel drawn by the primitive. In this case, only the result of the rasterization of an oval affects the Bitmap. There's no special masking going on, the oval itself is the mask.

Anyhow, here is a simplified view of the pipeline:

  1. Primitive (rect, oval, path, etc.)
  2. PathEffect
  3. Rasterization
  4. MaskFilter
  5. Color/Shader/ColorFilter
  6. Xfermode

(I just saw your update and yes, what you found describes the stages of the pipeline in order.)

The pipeline becomes just a little bit more complicated when using layers (Canvas.saveLayer()), as the pipeline doubles. You first go through the pipeline to render your primitive(s) inside an offscreen bitmap (the layer), and the offscreen bitmap is then applied to the Canvas by going through the pipeline.

share|improve this answer
    
Then there's the relationship between the 2d and 3d pipelines in Android 3. –  Ed Burnette May 1 '11 at 18:41
    
Thanks. I think you missed the word "versus". I was saying drawBitmap has an intrinsic color, and was contrasting this with "vector" primitives like drawRect, that do not. Would it be correct to say that the Paint's color (or Shader, if one is set) is used for primitives that have no color, but for bitmaps the colors come from the bitmap itself? And are ColorFilters applied in all three cases (Color, Shader, and Bitmap)? –  Laurence Gonsalves May 1 '11 at 22:55
    
Regarding the masking of ovals, I said "conceptually". I know there isn't a temporary bitmap (unless saveLayer is used). I'm still not entirely clear on the masking thing. You say "the oval itself is the mask". If a BlurMaskFilter is applied then areas outside of the oval are affected. MaskFilter's documentation says it "perform[s] transformations on an alpha-channel mask". So does that mean that the mask for a drawing operation is equal to the set of pixels that have a non-0 alpha, or is there a mask separate from the alpha channel which is manipulated by MaskFilters? –  Laurence Gonsalves May 1 '11 at 22:59
    
In my earlier comment I meant "primitives that have no intrinsic color", where I said "primitives that have no color". –  Laurence Gonsalves May 1 '11 at 23:17
    
@Laurence For bitmaps the colors come from the bitmap itself, unless it's an alpha mask (A8 and A1 configs.) So for bitmaps, only the ColorFilter applies, not the Shader, nor the Paint's color (although the alpha component of the Paint's color does apply.) –  Romain Guy May 2 '11 at 0:41

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