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I'm getting a vector iterators incompatible error during runtime. the line where it happens is at the very end of the code section, inside the for loop (humans.push_back( Human(&deck, (*iter)) );) When I first got the error, I was using a different iterator than 'iter' by mistake, so the runtime error totally made sense. But now that I changed it and recompiled everything (I double checked that), I still get this error.

void BlackjackGame::getHumansAndHouse()
{
    // asks how many players, pushes_back vector accordingly, initializes house, checking for valid input throughout
    string input;
    vector<string> names;
    while(true)
    {
        cout << "How many humans? (1 - 7)" << endl;
        cin >> input;
        if(!isdigit(input[0]))
            cout << "Invalid input. ";
        else
        {
            input.erase(1);
            int j = atoi(input.c_str());
            for(int i = 1; i <= j; i++)
            {
                while(true)
                {
                    cout << "Enter player " << i << " name: ";
                    cin >> input;
                    if(strcmp(input.c_str(), "House") == 0)
                        cout << "Player name has to be different than 'House'." << endl;
                    else
                    {
                        names.push_back(input);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            break;
        }
    }
    vector<string>::iterator iter;
    for(iter = names.begin(); iter != names.end(); iter++)
        humans.push_back( Human(&deck, (*iter)) );

    house = House(&deck);
}

humans is a vector:

vector<Human> humans;

where Human is a class whose constructor is as follows:

Human(Deck *d, string n) : Player(d), name(n) { printNameCardsAndTotal(); }

(Human is a derived class of Player)

since iter is an iterator to a vector of strings, I don't understand why I get vector iterators incompatible in that line inside the for loop. It's not like I'm trying to use iter directly with humans.

error is here:

humans.push_back( Human(&deck, (*iter)) );
share|improve this question
    
Will you please post the code where the names and humans vectors are defined, as well as the actual error output? –  Josh Glover Apr 23 '11 at 7:38
    
names' iterator was on top of my code, I moved it to the bottom for clarity. the actual vector names is on top of the code section. and i posted humans as well. –  Edoz Apr 23 '11 at 7:43
    
Where's deck declared? –  Charles Bailey Apr 23 '11 at 7:52
    
OK, I see the vector and iterator definitions now, sorry about that. How about the compiler or runtime output (the error message, in a straight copy from your terminal and paste into a code box format)? –  Josh Glover Apr 23 '11 at 7:56
1  
Please provide a self-contained example. "self-contained" means that the source code is intended for compilation and execution without any dependencies other than the standard library. –  Oswald Apr 23 '11 at 8:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The error is in code that you do not show. The following code, which I have written based on your code and your descriptions, does not produce any errors:

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <cctype>

using namespace std;

class Deck
{
};

class Player()
{
  public:
    Player(Deck *d) {}
};

class Human : public Player
{
  public:
    Human(Deck *d, string n) : Player(d), name(n) {}
  private:
    string name;
};

class House
{
  public:
    House(Deck *d) {}
};

int main()
{
    Deck deck;
    vector<Human> humans;
    string input;
    vector<string> names;
    while(true)
    {
        cout << "How many humans? (1 - 7)" << endl;
        cin >> input;
        if(!isdigit(input[0]))
            cout << "Invalid input. ";
        else
        {
            input.erase(1);
            int j = atoi(input.c_str());
            for(int i = 1; i <= j; i++)
            {
                while(true)
                {
                    cout << "Enter player " << i << " name: ";
                    cin >> input;
                    if(strcmp(input.c_str(), "House") == 0)
                        cout << "Player name has to be different than 'House'." << endl;
                    else
                    {
                        names.push_back(input);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            break;
        }
    }
    vector<string>::iterator iter;
    for(iter = names.begin(); iter != names.end(); iter++)
        humans.push_back( Human(&deck, (*iter)) );

    House house = House(&deck);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm - I wonder what the problem was? –  Michael Burr Apr 24 '11 at 4:20

Instead, try

iter != names.end()
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answer, but the error is in the next line! (I tried just in case, it doesn't solve the problem). By the way, is using != faster? –  Edoz Apr 23 '11 at 7:40
1  
@Edoz: It's likely to make no difference for std::vector. std::vector has random access iterators so it's perfectly fine to use <. –  Charles Bailey Apr 23 '11 at 7:53

Always pre-increment iterators in a for loop and use it != end as your sentinel in C++ (this also goes for ints.

for(iter = names.begin(); iter **!=** names.end(); **++iter**)
share|improve this answer
    
is ++iter different than iter++? anyway I tried that, it doesn't work –  Edoz Apr 23 '11 at 7:45
    
note that the error is INSIDE the for loop, not at the 'declaration' of it (I checked with breakpoints) –  Edoz Apr 23 '11 at 7:48
    
Yes ++iter is different, but it shouldn't make a difference here. Try for(iter = names.begin(); iter != names.end(); iter++) humans.push_back( Human(&deck, string("foo") ); and see if that works to begin with, if it does then you know that there is something going on with iter. –  briantyler Apr 23 '11 at 7:50
    
thanks for the tip, yes, I still get the error using 'foo'. it means the problem is not iter! but then why do I get an iterator error? –  Edoz Apr 23 '11 at 7:55
1  
Firstly for iterators it is always more efficient because it avoids making a copy of the iterator (for int types there is no performance gain). Secondly if you get into the habit of using it all the time for all data types (unless you explicitly need a post increment) then you will be optimising your code for free without thinking. It is just a good habit. Also if you always use != in your for loops then you can swap seamlessly between int and iterator without any change in syntax. (it might be Effective C++, can't remember) –  briantyler Apr 23 '11 at 8:06

The Microsoft <vector> header implementation has some debugging checks enabled in your build that make iterators much richer objects than mere pointers - they keep track of the container they're iterating through and their 'neighbor' iterators as well as the object they're pointing to. The assertion you're running into is checking that 2 iterators that should be pointing into the same container, but it's finding that they don't (according to the iterators' state).

So you're either corrupting the iterator objects/lists somewhere or you're doing something that isn't shown in your code snippets.

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