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Inverting rotation in 3D, to make an object always face the camera?

I have some 2D images in 3D space that I would like to face the camera at all times. These objects are inside a stack of transformations (since I want them to move relative to another object, to keep a long story short). What would be the easiest way to implement this?

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Apr 14 '12 at 13:28

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Mathematics, it's been too long, so this won't suffice for an answer. You can use the surface normal of your 2d images to point to the camera. Assuming that your 2D images are on a simple plane. –  Nick Weaver Apr 23 '11 at 10:22

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I answered this already here: Inverting rotation in 3D, to make an object always face the camera?

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So why not mark the question as a duplicate and vote to close? –  pmr Apr 23 '11 at 14:00

Your 2D image in 3D space facing the camera is called a billboard and it is commonly used in any 3D engine to represent complex geometries like trees, plants, particles, etc.

To calculate the orientation of your billboard, browse your transformation stack backward to find the view point with respect to your billboard. Then rotate the plane in a way that the normal of the plane looks to that view point.

In special cases like trees or plants, billboards have a constrained axis, because you would want those objects vertical with respect to the floor.

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While this would work in principle, this method is a lot more complicated, than it needs to be. See my post. –  datenwolf Apr 23 '11 at 10:57

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