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Here's a situation that comes up quite often that never sits too easy with me. I thought I'd ask how others handle it.

Imagine if the handling of a demo=60 command line argument was done like this:

if DemoOptionSpecified() {
  timeout = ReadInDemoTimeout();
  DoDemoVersion(timeout);
} else
  DoRealVersion();

DemoOptionSpecified() does some sort of grep on the argument string and return true or false.

ReadInDemoTimeout() also does some sort of grep, same string, and returns an integer.

Two greps doing two different things, but of course only a single grep is needed to do both. Two greps instead of one might not matter here, but in other scenarios, two database or Ajax calls might.

I don't particularly like having DemoOptionSpecified() do anything more than seeing if the option is supplied. An additional capturing of the value would not be suggested by the method name.

I don't particularly like the alternative of having a method called ReadInDemoTimeout() returning false if the demo option doesn't exist, as I only want to hear about timeout values if the option is set. DoRealVersion() does not care about the timeout value.

I don't feel there's a good no-compromise clean-code pattern for this. Thoughts?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see any problem with having a method that does both - you just have to name it correctly:

DemoOption demoOption = getDemoOption();
if (demoOption.wasSpecified()) {
    int timeout = demoOption.getValue();
    doDemoVersion(timeout);
}
else {
    doRealVersion();
}

You could even make it simpler, and have the method return the value, or null if the option was not set:

Integer demoTimeout = getDemoOptionIfSpecified();
if (demoTimeout != null) {
    doDemoVersion(demoTimeout);
}
else {
    doRealVersion();
}

And then i'd make the method general-purpose:

Integer demoTimeout = getOptionIfSpecified("demo", Integer.class);
if (demoTimeout != null) {
    doDemoVersion(demoTimeout);
}
else {
    doRealVersion();
}

I don't see that as being a method which does two things. The one thing it does is "get the valueof the option if there is one". You can then ask two questions about the result - is there one, and what is its value? - but that's happening in the calling code.

If you insist on not bringing back the value unless it's needed, how about injecting it?

interface OptionHandler<T> {
    public void specified(T optionValue);
    public void notSpecified();
}

handleOptionIfSpecified("demo", new OptionHandler<Integer>() {
    public void specified(Integer timeout) {
        doDemoVersion(timeout);
    }
    public void notSpecified() {
        doRealVersion();
    }
});

But seriously, if i was reading your code and i saw anything other than the third version, i'd see overcomplication and start refactoring. The idiom of speculatively getting a value and dealing with null and non-null cases differently is very widespread (in Java, at least); no useful purpose is served by avoiding it in pursuit of some notional kind of purity.

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The first version is getting closer and may be indeed the best thing to satisfy my pedantry. Your second and third versions I find the same as I noted in the comment to Greg--the timeout detail is only needed if the demo option is set, so ideally I'd like it to be encapsulated within the demo block so the code can be scanned quickly without visual noise. –  jontyc Apr 23 '11 at 11:11
    
I'll add another, even more complicated, option which may entertain you. –  Tom Anderson Apr 23 '11 at 12:28
    
Yes, it entertained me! :) It's not purity I strive for, it's whatever code can be read and understood the quickest. Of course this is a simple example here and anything (bar injection!) could be read quickly by anyone. I'll let the analysis by paralysis dissipate and sleep on it. –  jontyc Apr 23 '11 at 14:08

Perhaps something like this, using C++ for example:

bool GetDemoOption(int &timeout);

int timeout;
if (GetDemoOption(timeout)) {
    DoDemoVersion(timeout);
} else {
    DoRealVersion();
}

This relies on C++ being able to easily pass back an option value by reference. This is a bit more awkward in a language with strictly pass-by-value semantics such as Java or Python. In Python, however, one can return more than one value from a function:

exist, timeout = GetDemoOption()
if exist:
    DoDemoVersion(timeout)
else:
    DoRealVersion()
share|improve this answer
    
Your C++ example, timeout only has relevance to the demo version so I'd like to hide or encapsulate it in the block dealing with the Demo. Same with the Python example. Also I'm never keen on multiple return values, especially in languages like PHP where there is no predeclaration to document such. –  jontyc Apr 23 '11 at 10:57

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