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I'm having a moral dilemma. I have some value objects in my application, which are immutable and extremely simple. I've generated the equals and hashcode with an IDE (intellij in my case) but doing that, made the code coverage drop, plus the reports now indicate that those value objects are very complex (using the cyclomatic complexity metric) when in fact they're dead simple.

As an example, the following equals is in a value object that has 3 immutable attributes. The Code complexity is 14 (javaNCSS) and it has 26 execution branches (Cobertura). I should add too, that I fail the build if any method has a complexity greater than 10.

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (this == o) {
        return true;
    }
    if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }

    TranscriptTaskDetails that = (TranscriptTaskDetails) o;

    if (inputFile != null ? !inputFile.equals(that.inputFile) : that.inputFile != null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (language != that.language) {
        return false;
    }
    if (outputFile != null ? !outputFile.equals(that.outputFile) : that.outputFile != null) {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

I'm wondering what other devs use to circumvent this, as I pay quite a lot of attention to the complexity reports, as in my experience a high complexity metric relates to more bugs, so this auto-generated equals and hashcodes are polluting the reports.

I'm thinking of using EqualsBuilder and HashcodeBuilder from apache commons-lang to circumvent this, but I'm not 100% happy :S.

Edit

I should have added that part of the code I'm writing for this project is a library that will be used by other business units... And will be maintained by a different team too :S.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm thinking of using EqualsBuilder and HashcodeBuilder from apache commons-lang to circumvent this, but I'm not 100% happy :S.

Why not use these?

Using them reduces the size and complexity of your own methods and it's much easier to verify visually that equals and hashCode are implemented consistently.

It's of course also a good idea and pretty easy to test that the equals/hashCode contract is satisfied, so by all means, write tests.

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I think this is the best answer, as the other discouraged to check the tests. In the end, I've found that some of the equals/hashcodes were added just for testing purposes (it is bad to add production code for testing purposes). And in the cases that we actually needed a equals/hashcode, we found that we would always (aka until this changes) want to compare all the fields of the value object for equality. –  Augusto Apr 26 '11 at 13:38

I think that your real problem is placing too much faith in artificial measure such as code coverage cyclomatic complexity.

The plain facts are that:

  • the generated code is correct ... modulo that you have chosen the correct model of equality, and
  • the generated code is not complicated ... or at least, no more complicated than it needs to be.

Learn to trust your own judgment, and stop relying on tools to make your design decisions for you.


And the corollary of what I just said is that if you think you can (and should) simplify the generated code while still ensuring that it is correct for your current and projected use cases, go ahead and simplify it.


By the way, a generated equals / hashcode pair are probably more likely to be more correct than a hand written one ... written by an "average bear" programmer. For instance, note the careful way that the generated code handles null fields and the comparison of the types. A lot of developers wouldn't get those right.

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There's a contradiction here. You don't have any reason at all to worry about the complexity of auto-generated code. It's the hand coding you should be worrying about.

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3  
auto-generated code sometimes gets edited after generation... –  Don Roby Apr 23 '11 at 13:40
    
Don is right. I wouldn't really mind if the whole class is auto-generated, but since a part of it is auto-generated and "on-demand" rather than automatically, it becomes more of a concern. –  Augusto Apr 23 '11 at 13:46
    
@Don true but so as to increase the complexity? –  EJP Apr 26 '11 at 8:32

How high is your code coverage? Some people argue that shooting for 100% is a sign of anal retentive tendencies. If you're in the 70-80% range, and you know that what you haven't tested isn't a problem, then why worry about it?

On the other hand, these tests aren't that difficult to write. Why not write them, be done with it, and sleep at night ? You would have finished the test in the time it took to type your moral dilemma here and waiting for answers.

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The line coverage stands at 82% at the moment, and I prefer it to be above 80%. But the branch is at 65% and it's lowered mostly by these methods. The problem is not only the coverage, but the "complexity" they add to the class, which is shown in the reports. I know that I'm being a bit anal about this, but I'm trying to build something that will last rather than thrown away in a couple of years. –  Augusto Apr 23 '11 at 13:48

I think your goals of low complexity and high coverage are admirable. I've found that the Google Guava library is quite useful in this kind of problem (and also great for other problems.) You could write the following:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (this == o) {
        return true;
    }
    if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }

    TranscriptTaskDetails that = (TranscriptTaskDetails) o;
    return Objects.equal(inputFile, that.inputFile) && Objects.equal(language, that.language) && Objects.equal(outputFile, that.outputFile);

}

You could then use the EqualsTester to quickly get coverage of this method. You get simplicity and testing coverage. Thanks to this SO question for helping me find EqualsTester.

Another option that I've recently started using is Lombok. Lombok is a great library for writing immutable value objects. Here is a sample lombok class:

@Data
public class Value {
    private final String field1;
    private final Foo field2;
}

The @Data annotation causes lombok to generate a bunch of code for you. You get getters (and for non-final fields) setters. You get equals, hashCode, and toString. You get an all args constructor. And all those methods are automatically updated when you change the field list. I've trimmed hundreds of lines from my current project with Lombok and my value objects are now always completely implemented.

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In my opinion, seeing code coverage drop is an indicator that you should have a look at the code and find out by yourself if the drop in coverage is justified. Code metrics on things like generated equals or hashcode are not really important, they are so simple that they just work. Same for simple getters and setters, who really cares if some of them are not covered? (That may be a symptom of some other thing not being tested though, but that is beside the point).

Tools are here to help us write good code and applications... we should not be slaves to them.

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Simple POJOs - immutable with or without builders, or mutable, are at best automatically generated from a simple DSL description in the first place, until Java gets direct language support for this simple, yet important feature.

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