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using namespace std;

void reverse(char a[],int slen, int elen)
 {
     int start,end,temp;
     for(start=slen,end=elen;start<end;start++,end--)
            {
                temp=a[start];
                a[start]=a[end];
                a[end]=temp;
            }
 }

 void reverseall(char b[])
  {
      char a[15];
      int i,j,n=0,len;
      for(i=14,j=0;i>=0,j<15;i--,j++)
           a[j]=b[i];

      i=0;
      j=0;

      while(a[i]!='\0')
         {cout<<"h";
            n++;
            i++;
         }

      while(j!=n)
         {
            if(j!=0)
              j++;
            len=0;
            while(a[j]!= ' ' && a[j]!='\0')
             {
                len++;
                j++;
             }
            reverse(a,j-len,j-1);
         }

     for(i=0;i<n;i++)
        cout<<a[i];
  }
int main()
 {
     char b[20]="hi how are you";
     reverseall(b);
     return 0;
 }

I modified a working program of reversing in place, and just added 3 lines and the while loop is not working now.

 for(i=14,j=0;i>=0,j<15;i--,j++)
               a[j]=b[i];

          i=0;
          j=0;  

Here is the link to the program, I want the output as "you are how hi".

Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by liori, the_drow, Bo Persson, John Saunders, Graviton Apr 27 '11 at 3:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
It's "now" working? Did you mean "not" in the title? What is not working, what are you seeing instead of what you want? And is this a homework question or part of an interview? –  John Zwinck Apr 23 '11 at 15:00
1  
The code is also not indented very well. –  Dhaivat Pandya Apr 23 '11 at 15:01
    
@John Oh my bad, cant edit it somehow. –  Ava Apr 23 '11 at 15:03
    
Thanks John did the correction –  Ava Apr 23 '11 at 15:04
    
@imaginatives which loop is not working –  Yet Another Geek Apr 23 '11 at 15:07
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change it to

  for(i=13,j=0;i>=0,j<15;i--,j++)
       a[j]=b[i];
  a[14] = '\0';

and it will work (codepad).

What happened was that you reversed the input string, but it contains a \0 character at the end, so your arrays first character was \0 and the rest of the code did nothing anymore.

So what we're doing now is to reverse everything except the \0 character and adding a \0 at the end of the string.

Please note that you're using magic numbers everywhere. For testing, this can be fine, but you should change this, f.e. getting the length of the input string and using this instead of the magic numbers 13/14/15.

Have a look at this codepad to see how it can be done better. Excerpt:

int b_len = strlen(b);
char* a = (char*)malloc((b_len + 1) * sizeof(char));
for(i = 0; i < b_len; i++)
     a[b_len - i - 1] = b[i];
a[b_len] = '\0';

[...]

free(a);
share|improve this answer
    
Oh yes Thanks a lot! Got it. –  Ava Apr 23 '11 at 15:17
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The condition i>=0,j<15 probably does not do what you think it does. First, i>=0 is evaluated (which is either true or false), then the result is discarded, and then j<15 is evaluated and delivers the result. That is, i>=0,j<15 is equivalent to just j<15. What you probably want is i>=0 && j<15.

Note how I replaced the comma operator with the binary-and operator. In general, the expression a, b means first evaluate a, then evaluate b, and the result of the latter is the result of the entire expression. Unless evaluating a has a side-effect (such as modifying a variable), this is nonsense. Any sane compiler will warn you here if you crank the warning levels up, which you should almost always do.

The expression a && b means first evaluate a. If it is false, the result of a && b is also false. Otherwise, b is evaluated, and the result of that is the result of the entire expression. That is, the expression a && b only evaluate to true if both a and b are evaluated to true. Note that b is not evaluated at all if a is already false, because no matter what value b had, it could not possibly influence the result anymore. This behavior is called short-circuit-evaluation.

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+1, good catch! –  schnaader Apr 26 '11 at 22:18
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The for loop should not have "{" in the start, and "}" in the end? As long as it is more than one line.

for {
...
...
...
}

instead of:

for
...
...
...
share|improve this answer
    
+1 You can only not use braces when there is only one statement. –  Dhaivat Pandya Apr 23 '11 at 15:01
1  
It would'nt make sense in the way he is using it, otherwise it would be useless to initialize i to 14 and the setting it to zero without any branching –  Yet Another Geek Apr 23 '11 at 15:04
    
@all I am confused of what you guys are saying. There is just 1 line under my for. –  Ava Apr 23 '11 at 15:07
2  
This isn't correct... @imaginatives don't worry about it, they thought that you meant to have 3 lines under it. –  alternative Apr 23 '11 at 15:07
    
Yeah thats right. I thought that you added 3 extra lines (that you did not make visible to us) after the for loop. The for loop is ok as it is –  George Sach Apr 23 '11 at 15:24
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