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So I'm still kind of new to Python decorators - I've used them before, but I've never made my own. I'm reading this tutorial (that particular paragraph) and I don't seem to understand why do we need three levels of functions? Why can't we do something like this:

def decorator(func, *args, **kwargs):
    return func(*args,**kwargs)

Thanks :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Well, what would happen if you called that decorator on a function?

@decorator
def foo(): pass

This code would immediately call foo, which we don't want. Decorators are called and their return value replaces the function. It's the same as saying

def foo(): pass
foo = decorator(foo)

So if we have a decorator that calls foo, we probably want to have a function that returns a function that calls foo -- that function that it returns will replace foo.

def decorator(f):
    def g(*args, **kwargs):
        return f(*args, **kwargs)
    return g

Now, if we want to pass options to the decorator, we can't exactly pass them ins ide-by-side with the function like in your example. There's no syntax for it. So we define a function that returns a parameterized decorator. The decorator it returns will be a closure.

def argument_decorator(will_I_call_f):
    def decorator(f):
        def g(*args, **kwargs):
            if will_I_call_f: return f(*args, **kwargs)
        return g
    return decorator

so we can do

decorator = argument_decorator(True)
@decorator
def foo(): pass

And Python offers the convenience syntax where you inline the function call:

@argument_decorator(True)
def foo(): pass

And all this is syntax sugar for the non-decorator syntax of

def foo(): pass
foo = argument_decorator(True)(foo)
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+1 Good explanation. An example for the last one "in action" would be useful as well, imho. –  delnan Apr 23 '11 at 15:09
    
The init/call pattern is another alternative for when you want to provide arguments to your decorator. artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=240845 –  kevpie Apr 23 '11 at 15:18
    
Thanks, that really helped :) –  Justinas Apr 23 '11 at 15:23
1  
Personally I wouldn't use a decorator class unless I wanted to maintain state on the decorator. Closures are readable when you're used to them. Unfortunately, the question-asker wasn't. :( –  Devin Jeanpierre Apr 23 '11 at 15:59
1  
@detly: Decorator classes cause trouble when applied to methods - as they're not functions, the object wrapping them isn't recognized as method. You have to replicate the logic of instancemethod descriptors (by Python standards, that's relatively much boilerplate code, and non-obvious at that) or self won't get passed in. –  delnan Apr 23 '11 at 16:58

A decorator modifies a function by adding a wrapper to it. At the time you decorate the function, it isn't being called yet, so you don't have any arguments (or keyword arguments) to look at. All you can do for now is create a new function that will handle those arguments when it finally gets them.

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