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I am having problems downloading a binary file (video) in my app from the internet. In Quicktime, If I download it directly it works fine but through my app somehow it get's messed up (even though they look exactly the same in a text editor). Here is a example:

    URL u = new URL("http://www.path.to/a.mp4?video");
    HttpURLConnection c = (HttpURLConnection) u.openConnection();
    c.setRequestMethod("GET");
    c.setDoOutput(true);
    c.connect();
    FileOutputStream f = new FileOutputStream(new File(root,"Video.mp4"));


    InputStream in = c.getInputStream();

    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    int len1 = 0;
    while ( (len1 = in.read(buffer)) > 0 ) {
         f.write(buffer);
    }
    f.close();
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6 Answers 6

up vote 77 down vote accepted

I don't know if it's the only problem, but you've got a classic Java glitch in there: You're not counting on the fact that read() is always allowed to return fewer bytes than you ask for. Thus, your read could get less than 1024 bytes but your write always writes out exactly 1024 bytes possibly including bytes from the previous loop iteration.

Correct with:

 while ( (len1 = in.read(buffer)) > 0 ) {
         f.write(buffer,0, len1);
 }

Perhaps the higher latency networking or smaller packet sizes of 3G on Android are exacerbating the effect?

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3  
What a stupid mistake... thanks! This is what happens when you don't read the tutorial properly :) –  Isaac Waller Feb 23 '09 at 5:03
3  
Thanks... helped me too. –  fiXedd Jul 24 '09 at 22:11
    
What about initializing the buffer? What about protecting against exception? What about releasing the resources? I think it is a good but not a complete answer. There are other more complete answers here. –  AlikElzin-kilaka Jun 23 '11 at 17:04
2  
I would like to point out that the > 0 test can prematurely end the reading. The Documentation says that -1 is returned at the end of the stream. –  Clint Nov 18 '11 at 21:05
1  
@Clint : true, but the documentation also says (as of java 5), that 0 cannot be returned unless the 'len' param is 0 (If no byte is available (...) -1 is returned; otherwise, at least one byte is read). In java 2, 0 can be returned. –  njzk2 Feb 27 '12 at 15:47
new DefaultHttpClient().execute(new HttpGet("http://www.path.to/a.mp4?video"))
        .getEntity().writeTo(
                new FileOutputStream(new File(root,"Video.mp4")));
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2  
one line solution . Nice –  SANTHOSH Nov 2 '11 at 7:01
    
I like one line solution as well. However, you should check entity before writing to file, otherwise the file will be created even if there is a problem with download. So next time, you might attempt to open a damaged file. –  doraemon May 28 '13 at 3:48
    
How do I name the downloaded file same as the original file name dynamically? –  Compaq LE2202x Dec 19 '13 at 1:42
    
With that method, you'd need to add a few things, such as getting the Content-Disposition header that contains the file name. –  njzk2 Dec 19 '13 at 14:53
    
Awesome .. (+1).. this works reli well..and the pdf downloaded is never corrupted also.. –  Rat-a-tat-a-tat Ratatouille Jul 5 at 8:19

One problem is your reading of the buffer. If every read of the input stream is not an exact multiple of 1024 you will copy bad data. Use:

byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
int len1 = 0;
while ( (len1 = in.read(buffer)) != -1 ) {
  f.write(buffer,0, len1);
}
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On line 4, do you mean len1, not len? –  Isaac Waller Feb 23 '09 at 4:52
    
I look at Ry4an example and assume you mean len1 - thanks. –  Isaac Waller Feb 23 '09 at 4:59
 public class download extends Activity {

     private static String fileName = "file.3gp";
     private static final String MY_URL = "Your download url goes here";

     @Override
     public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        try {
            URL url = new URL(MY_URL);
            HttpURLConnection c = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
            c.setRequestMethod("GET");
            c.setDoOutput(true);
            c.connect();

            String PATH = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory()
                + "/download/";
            Log.d("Abhan", "PATH: " + PATH);
            File file = new File(PATH);
            if(!file.exists()) {
               file.mkdirs();
            }
            File outputFile = new File(file, fileName);
            FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(outputFile);
            InputStream is = c.getInputStream();
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int len1 = 0;
            while ((len1 = is.read(buffer)) != -1) {
                fos.write(buffer, 0, len1);
            }
            fos.flush();
            fos.close();
            is.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            Log.e("Abhan", "Error: " + e);
        }
        Log.i("Abhan", "Check Your File.");
    } 
}
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This answer will not work. Network connections on the main thread will throw android.os.NetworkOnMainThreadException. –  JBirdVegas Nov 9 at 15:24

I fixed the code based on previous feedbacks on this thread. I tested using eclipse and multiple large files. It is working fine. Just have to copy and paste this to your environment and change the http path and the location which you would like the file to be downloaded to.

try {
    //this is the file you want to download from the remote server
    String path ="http://localhost:8080/somefile.zip";
    //this is the name of the local file you will create
    String targetFileName
        boolean eof = false;
    URL u = new URL(path);
    HttpURLConnection c = (HttpURLConnection) u.openConnection();
    c.setRequestMethod("GET");
    c.setDoOutput(true);
    c.connect();
    FileOutputStream f = new FileOutputStream(new File("c:\\junk\\"+targetFileName));
        InputStream in = c.getInputStream();
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
        int len1 = 0;
        while ( (len1 = in.read(buffer)) > 0 ) {
        f.write(buffer,0, len1);
                 }
    f.close();
    } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (ProtocolException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Good luck Alireza Aghamohammadi

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in this way, will the same file be downloaded. i mean if the file is already downloaded will it give a alert? –  Loshi Aug 15 '12 at 4:01

Just use apache's copy method (Apache Commons IO) - the advantage of using Java!

IOUtils.copy(is, os);

Do not forget to close the streams in a finally block:

try{
      ...
} finally {
  IOUtils.closeQuietly(is);
  IOUtils.closeQuietly(os);
}
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2  
And don't cross the streams, either. –  Jarett Millard Jun 22 '12 at 17:34
    
A 200k library just to download a file..... –  fiXedd Sep 13 '13 at 15:25

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