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I am trying to copy some strings to strings in a struct using strcpy. I am posting the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
typedef struct floating_point{
    char sign[2];
    char exponent[9];
    char fraction[24];
}FLOATING_POINT;
FLOATING_POINT stringToFloatingPoint(char* str){
    struct floating_point fp;
    char *integer_str,*fraction_str,*integer_bin,*fraction_bin,*sign;
    sign=(char*)malloc(2*sizeof(char));
    int i=1,integer=0,fraction=0,comma=0,remainder=0,size=0;
    double fraction_double;
    //str=(char*)malloc(200*sizeof(char));
    //str="108,53";
    char * pch=(char*)malloc((strlen(str)+1)*sizeof(char));
    pch=strchr(str,',');
    if(pch==NULL){
        pch=str+strlen(str);
    }
    comma=pch-str;
    integer_str=(char*)malloc((comma+1)*sizeof(char));
    strncpy(integer_str,str,comma);
    integer_str[comma]='\0',
    integer=atoi(integer_str);
    fraction_str=(char*)malloc((strlen(str)-comma+2)*sizeof(char));
    strncpy(fraction_str,str+comma+1,strlen(str)-1);
    fraction_str[strlen(str)-comma]='\0';
    fraction=atoi(fraction_str);
    printf("%d",fraction);
    printf("%s",fraction_str);
    if(integer<0){
        strcpy(sign,"1");
        integer=-1*integer;
    }
    else{
        strcpy(sign,"0");
    }
    size=(int)(log(integer)/log(2))+2;
    integer_bin=(char*)malloc(size*sizeof(char));
    while(integer>0){
        remainder=fmod(integer,2);
        integer=integer/2;
        *(integer_bin+size-i-1)=(char)(remainder+48);
        i++;
    }
    *(integer_bin+size-i-1)=(char)(integer+48);
    *(integer_bin+size-1)='\0';
    printf("%s\n",integer_bin);
    fraction_bin=(char*)malloc(24*sizeof(char));
    fraction_double=atof(fraction_str);
    fraction_double=fraction_double/(pow(10,strlen(fraction_str)));
    printf("frac= %f",fraction_double);
    i=0;
    while((i<23)&&fraction_double!=0){
        fraction_double=2*fraction_double;
        if(fraction_double<1){
            *(fraction_bin+i)='0';
        }
        else{
            fraction_double=fraction_double-1;
            *(fraction_bin+i)='1';
        }
        i++;
    }
    *(fraction_bin+i)='\0';
    printf("\n%s",integer_bin);
    printf("\n%s",fraction_bin);
    size=strlen(integer_bin);
    for(i=0;i<strlen(fraction_bin)-(size-1);i++){
        *(fraction_bin+strlen(fraction_bin)-1-i)=*(fraction_bin+strlen(fraction_bin)-size-i);
    }
    for(i=1;i<size;i++){
        *(fraction_bin+i-1)=*(integer_bin+i);
    }
    printf("\n%s",fraction_bin);
    free(integer_bin);
    integer_bin=(char*)malloc(9*sizeof(char));
    strcpy(integer_bin,"00000000");
    printf("integer_bin %s",integer_bin);
    integer=127+size-1;
    i=1;
    while(integer>0){
        remainder=fmod(integer,2);
        integer=integer/2;
        *(integer_bin+8-i)=(char)(remainder+48);
        i++;

    }

    *(integer_bin+8-i)=(char)(integer+48);
    *(integer_bin+8)='\0';
    printf("\n\n%s %s %s",sign,integer_bin,fraction_bin);
    strcpy(fp.exponent,integer_bin);
    strcpy(fp.sign,sign);
    strcpy(fp.fraction,fraction_bin);
    free(integer_bin);
    free(integer_str);
    free(fraction_bin);
    free(fraction_str);
    free(sign);
    free(pch);
}
int main()
{

    struct floating_point fp=stringToFloatingPoint("108,53");
    printf("\n\n%s %s %s",fp.sign,fp.exponent,fp.fraction);
}

Everything works well till the strcpy part. printf("\n\n%s %s %s",sign,integer_bin,fraction_bin); This printf works well. And the size of my strings are equal to the ones in the struct. You can see how much memory I have allocated using malloc. I dont get an error but when I print the values in my main funciton they are not correct. What can the problem be?

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1  
That's a lot of code that mucks with integer_bin and fraction_bin...have you tried using a debugger? edit: I missed the part where you said your printf worked. Jonathan Leffler's answer is probably it, as you don't return. –  birryree Apr 23 '11 at 17:02
2  
Hurting my eyes...ouch!! –  al-Acme Apr 23 '11 at 17:03
2  
do you need to post all that code? you really should just post the lines that are throwing the error –  Nate Koppenhaver Apr 23 '11 at 17:03
    
it is really badly written (style and not only)... if it is an exercize, you can do better; if it is not, let me say it exists strtof ... –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '11 at 17:14
    
indeed the program has a lot of issues and it does not work to me –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '11 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your function is missing its return statement.

You should pay more attention to the compiler warnings, or turn more warnings on, or get a better compiler.

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I am really tired. I haven't got any attention left :D Thanks :), –  Alptugay Apr 23 '11 at 17:57

You missed a return in the function stringToFloatingPoint... at least this one is a problem...

Add

Just to let you know, executing gcc -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall ./boh.c -lm or similar for your compiler, would have say:

./boh.c: In function ‘stringToFloatingPoint’:
./boh.c:105: warning: control reaches end of non-void function

Valgrind would say:

==6480== HEAP SUMMARY:
==6480==     in use at exit: 7 bytes in 1 blocks
==6480==   total heap usage: 7 allocs, 7 frees, 59 bytes allocated
==6480== 
==6480== LEAK SUMMARY:
==6480==    definitely lost: 7 bytes in 1 blocks

You mostly can avoid allocation, especially of two chars or so...

Moreover, running it will give a problem (double free or corruption)...

Likely the leak is here:

   char * pch=(char*)malloc((strlen(str)+1)*sizeof(char));
    pch=strchr(str,',');
    if(pch==NULL){
        pch=str+strlen(str);
    }

Here you are allocating memory, then you search for a char and trash the pointer to the allocated memory... If you then will try to free(pch), you will cause a problem...

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but after fixing that, running it will cause segfault anyway, so there are other problems... good luck! –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '11 at 17:25
    
Yeah I have forgotten the return statement. I will fix that leak also. Thanks –  Alptugay Apr 23 '11 at 17:54

Your function is specified as returning a FLOATING_POINT structure:

FLOATING_POINT stringToFloatingPoint(char* str)

But nowhere in the function is there a return statement.

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Oh my god :D How couldn't I see it. I think I need a rest. Thanks! –  Alptugay Apr 23 '11 at 17:53

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