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Is there a way to stop setTimeout("myfunction()",10000); from counting up when the page isn't active. For instance,

  1. A user arrives at a "some page" and stays there for 2000ms
  2. User goes to another tab, leaves "some page" open.
  3. myfunction() doesn't fire until they've come back for another 8000ms.
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5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Here you go:

(function() {
    var time = 10000,
        delta = 100,
        tid;

    tid = setInterval(function() {
        if ( window.blurred ) { return; }    
        time -= delta;
        if ( time <= 0 ) {
            clearInterval(tid);
            myFunction(); // time passed - do your work
        }
    }, delta);
})();

window.onblur = function() { window.blurred = true; };
window.onfocus = function() { window.blurred = false; };

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/simevidas/J68dJ/3/show/

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Unless I'm missing something, this will not run setInterval functions on initial page load before any user interactions such as clicks on the page, since the onfocus event does not appear to fire on initial page load. –  torazaburo May 17 '13 at 6:07
    
@torazaburo Initially, window.blurred will be undefined which is the same as if it were false. Hence, the timer starts counting down automatically. Note how the setInterval executes immediately - it doesn't wait for a focus or blur to occur. –  Šime Vidas May 17 '13 at 13:33

You can do something like:

$([window, document]).blur(function(){
        // Clear timeout here
}).focus(function(){
        // start timeout back up here
});

Window is for IE, document is for the rest of the browser world.

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thank you for this reply. I used the other as it fulfilled all the reqs. But about this one, I had more success with $(window) as the object for all browsers. –  Emile Apr 26 '11 at 20:57

Great answer by Šime Vidas, it helped me with my own coding. For completeness sake I made an example for if you want to use setTimeout instead of setInterval:

(function() {

    function myFunction() {
        if(window.blurred) {
            setTimeout(myFunction, 100);
            return;
        }

        // What you normally want to happen

        setTimeout(myFunction, 10000);
    };
    setTimeout(myFunction, 10000);

    window.onblur = function() {window.blurred = true;};
    window.onfocus = function() {window.blurred = false;};

})();

You'll see that the window blurred check has a shorter time set than normal, so you can set this depending on how soon you require the rest of the function to be run when the window regains focus.

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Check out Detecting focus of a browser window.

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What you'd have to do is set up a mechanism to set timeouts at small intervals, keeping track of total elapsed time. You'd also track "mouseenter" and "mouseleave" on the whole page (the <body> or something). When the short-term timeouts expire, they can check the window state (in or out) and not restart the process when the window is not in focus. The "mouseenter" handler would start all paused timers.

edit — @Šime Vidas has posted an excellent example.

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