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I'm wondering is there some kind of JIT-hack going on with System.Lazy to make things more performant or is it purely a "normal class"?

From the page http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd642331.aspx it says:

Use an instance of Lazy(Of T) to defer the creation of a large or resource-intensive object or the execution of a resource-intensive task, particularly when such creation or execution might not occur during the lifetime of the program.

but i can defer the execution of a resource-intensive task using a simple boolean flag couldn't i? So what exactly is the difference? (other than System.Lazy has additional overheads for no apparent "syntax sugar" gains)

With a simple boolean flag its simply:

if (!deferred) {
    //run resource-intensive task
}

Edit:

here's an example

class Human{
    System.Lazy<String> name = new System.Lazy<String>(() =>
    {
        //code here takes 4 seconds to run
        return "the value";
    });
    String Name
    {
        get
        {
            return name.Value;
        }
    }
}

vs

class Human
{
    String name;
    bool name_initiated;
    String Name
    {
        get
        {
            if (!name_initiated)
            {
                //code here takes 4 seconds to run
                name = "the value";
                name_initiated = true;
            }
            return name;
        }
    }
}

6 May: now i use this alot. And i really mean alot alot. i use it whenever i need to cache data (even when the computation is 0.1 second or lesser). Hence my question, should i be worried? Now i know you will tell me to profile the app, but im building the library first before i build the app and by that time if the app has problems that would mean Major change

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1  
Can you show techique how to defer loading/execution with simple boolean flag? You can start with en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_by_need – Nick Martyshchenko Apr 23 '11 at 19:29
2  
I'll let someone less lazy formulate an answer... Oh by the way F# uses Lazy<T> and provides a bit of syntax sugar. let ls = lazy([1;2;3]) – ChaosPandion Apr 23 '11 at 19:30
    
@Nick i've edited the question to show how to defer loading/execution with a simple boolean flag. – Pacerier Apr 23 '11 at 19:34
    
@Nick.. the link justifies the use of lazy evaluation which im not arguing about. but it doesn't justify the use of System.Lazy which is why im saying we can achieve lazy evaluation with a simple boolean flag why use System.Lazy? – Pacerier Apr 23 '11 at 19:36
    
@Pacerier, but how it is deferred there? How computation triggered? And what is semantics for this flag? Do task whether deffered or eager? Anyway, Jon Skeet already placed a nice answer. Take a look. If you wonder why it ever exists take a look to another article how to implement singleton pattern: yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html it also can be done via simple boolean flag ;) – Nick Martyshchenko Apr 23 '11 at 19:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you could defer it with a simple Boolean flag. Of course, you'd need to handle volatility of both the flag and the result... and make sure you knew what you wanted in terms of the result if one thread asks for the result while it's still being computed. Oh, and try to avoid locking where possible. And make it all bulletproof in terms of thread safety.

Nah, no benefit at all to using a type built by experts ;)

Seriously: why do it yourself if someone else has done it for you? Why write the code to check a flag, work out how to wait safely, lock everything etc. Even if it were a relatively simple thing to get right, it's better if it only needs to be done once in a reusable fashion.

Another good example of this principle is Nullable<T>. You could easily get most of the same behaviour yourself (not boxing) or even not bother with the encapsulation at all, and just keep a flag alongside your normal field... but with the built-in type, you get all of that implemented for free, along with syntactic sugar etc.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jon, you have nice acticle about singleton implementation csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx, you can link it here since singleton can be "implemented" via simple boolean flag too. But its offtopic a bit of course. – Nick Martyshchenko Apr 23 '11 at 19:48
    
@Nick: Well, you can implement the singleton pattern with Lazy<T>, but it's not the same thing really... I think I'd prefer not to muddy the waters within my answer, but the link's in the comments now anyway :) – Jon Skeet Apr 23 '11 at 19:49
    
@Jon, I just want to show: things can be more complex than it looks in overview. Singleton (and your article and book) are nice demo on this. Of course, I don't think Lazy<T> same thing with singleton pattern :) – Nick Martyshchenko Apr 23 '11 at 19:53
    
@Jon Skeet sorry i guess I've not been clear on my question. I've edited my question to: should we use System.Lazy for resource-intensive task (when threading is not required) – Pacerier Apr 23 '11 at 21:45
1  
@Pacerier: The context of your question still isn't clear. If you can show us a complete sample, we can say whether Lazy<T> would be useful. It's a way of representing a value to be computed when it's first needed, which can then be used repeatedly. If you're not in that situation, it's not useful. – Jon Skeet Apr 23 '11 at 21:57

The Lazy class makes the process easier. It is similar to using a String instead of a character array. Not technically necessary, but can be useful.

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1  
String actually does provide a number of CLR-level optimizations that you couldn't implement outside of the runtime using a simple char[]. – dahlbyk Apr 23 '11 at 19:34
    
@dahlbyk: In either case, the main point of using String is the semantic simplicity. You could do interning yourself if you wanted, not in exactly the same way, but you could get the vast majority of the performance if you knew what you were doing. – Guvante Apr 24 '11 at 22:43

Lazy<T> is just an encapsulation of the best way to implement a lazy singleton. If you want thread-safety, there's more to it than just if(!initialized) instance = Initialize();. I generally assume the BCL team will be better at implementing than me.

Update: Based on your sample, I would say the advantage of Lazy<> is simply less code to maintain. Beyond that, they're essentially equivalent. My advice: use Lazy<> because it's easy and move on to harder problems.

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sorry i guess I've not been clear on my question. I've edited my question to: should we use System.Lazy for resource-intensive task (when threading is not required) – Pacerier Apr 23 '11 at 21:46

The Lazy class does all the thread-safety work for you, which is the sort of thing that is a lot more complicated than it sounds to implement by hand.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry i guess I've not been clear on my question. I've edited my question to: should we use System.Lazy for resource-intensive task (when threading is not required) – Pacerier Apr 23 '11 at 21:46

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