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What I want to do, is to replace a (static) method's body, with another method's body, while preserving the original method's body.

Let me start with an example:

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        switch (new Random().Next(3))
        {
            case 0:
                // Change MainFunction's body into a's body, storing the original body somewhere else
                break;
            case 1:
                // Change MainFunction's body into b's body, storing the original body somewhere else
                break;
            case 2:
                // Change MainFunction's body into c's body, storing the original body somewhere else
                break;
        }
        MainFunction(null);
    }

    public static void MainFunction(object someParameter)
    {
        Console.Write("The method called is: ");
    }

    private static void a(object someParameter)
    {
        // Call the 'base' method
        Console.WriteLine("a");
    }

    private static void b(object someParameter)
    {
        // Call the 'base' method
        Console.WriteLine("c");
    }

    private static void c(object someParameter)
    {
        // Call the 'base' method
        Console.WriteLine("c");
    }
}

The expected output is: 'The method called is: ' and 'a', 'b' or 'c'. I know this example is completely useless, and that's why it's an example, but I just want to know how to achieve this.

Does anybody know how to achieve this?

EDIT:
I am not looking for a delegate, I know they're very useful, but as I said this is an example, and I know how to achieve this.

I also know you should re-use randoms to avoid the overhead of recalculating the initial data, and to give the GC some rest.

The example is just to demonstrate the result, and of course this example can be easily solved using delegate, Action<T>, or if you want return values also Func<TOut>, but I'm not looking for that solution.

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what are you trying to achieve that would require replacing a method body? It would help to see a use case of this. –  BrokenGlass Apr 23 '11 at 20:45
    
@BrokenGlass Override a static method of a .Net Framework class. –  Aidiakapi Apr 23 '11 at 21:36
    
In that case, I think you're going about this the wrong way. There are lots of other tricks used to get around the no-static-overrides limitation in C#. Kirill Osenkov's blog has a good article about static overrides here: blogs.msdn.com/b/kirillosenkov/archive/2008/02/06/… –  Michael Hoffmann Apr 23 '11 at 22:00
    
@Michael Hoffmann No, I can't use that on static classes I don't have source access to (like the .Net classes). –  Aidiakapi Apr 24 '11 at 1:03
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

C# is a static-typed language. This means that the compiler reads your C# code, and turns it into an assembly-language .exe or .dll file.

As I understand it, when the compiler generates a method from your code, the method body is completely independent of the name of the method. The name of a method is simply an attribute associated with a chunk of code.

The runtime engine uses top-down logic; it starts at the beginning of your program (the Main method), and executes each statement, one at a time. When it encounters the assembly-language equivalent of "Call MyMethod", for example, it simply moves to the first statement in the chunk of code associated with "MyMethod", and starts executing from there. After all of the statements in the "MyMethod" code block have been executed, the runtime engine returns to where it was before MyMethod was called.

So, the 3 primary purposes of a method's name are

  1. Allowing you and other programmers using your code or assembly can identify the method and distinguish it from other methods
  2. Allowing the compiler to know which assembly-level method to associate with method calls in your source code
  3. And finally, executing the method's associated chunk of code at runtime.

What you're trying to do circumvents all of the purposes of having unique signatures for each method. Now, I understand that this is just an example program, so I won't point out what bad practice this is. However, I'm afraid that removing a method's name from it's associated body at runtime is completely impossible, without defining a new method dynamically or, as has been mentioned previously, using delegates.

Going back to the static nature of C#, what you're trying to do is a more common feature of dynamic-typed languages, like JavaScript, PHP, Lua, and others. In JavaScript, for example, you can define a function (the JavaScript equivalent of a method), assign it to a variable, later modify the value of the variable however you want, and call it on-the-fly. What makes this functionality possible is how the code is executed: in contrast to C# and other static-typed languages, each statement is read as human-readable source code, interpreted into one or more statements of executable computer-readable code, and executed, and the runtime engine moves on to the next statement (or to the beginning of a function call, as the case may be).

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Thanks for the thorough explanation, I suspected this, but I didn't know if it was completely impossible. I know about this possibility in dynamic languages, but I assumed since C# is partially dyanmic, because of reflection, CodeDom compilation, and runtime checked data typing. –  Aidiakapi Apr 23 '11 at 21:38
    
Glad to help :) People calling C# dynamic or semi-dynamic is very misleading- it left me with lots of confusion before I found a good explanation of how dynamic stuff works on a nitty-gritty level. Basically, the compiler sees dynamic, and knows to stop doing half of its job, looking only for syntax errors and ignoring undefined identifiers, and all operations are then checked at runtime. C#'s only dynamic feature (that I know of) that's dynamic in terms of on-the-fly member creation/definition is ExpandoObject. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Michael Hoffmann Apr 23 '11 at 22:10
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It sounds like what you really want here is a delegate.

You can create a delegate of type Action<object> and assign it in your code and then invoke the delegate in MainFunction as appropriate.

private Action<object> MainFunction;

private Random rand = new Random();

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    switch (rand.Next(3))
    {
        case 0: MainFunction = a; break;
        case 1: MainFunction = b; break;
        case 2: MainFunction = c; break;
    }
    MainFunction(null);
}

Also, while probably intended for illustration purposes only, the use of new Random() in your code is probably not what you want. Creating a new instance of Random will reset the random number sequence. Unless you will only ever fetch this one random value, you probably want to store the random number generator.

EDIT: I think you need to provide a better explanation of why the approach of using delegates is inadequate for your problem. Identifying the key requirements you need and a complete, relevant example will go a long way in getting an answer that satisfies you. In general, it is not possible to replace the body of a method of an existing class at runtime - this would violate the CLR security model. The best you can do is potentially generate a new class at runtime and emit methods with the appropriate signatures and bodies - however, it's unclear to me how this would be different from using a delegate.

Alternatively, it may be possible for you to use something like PostSHARP and use aspect oriented techniques to alter the behavior of MainFunction() at runtime. For instance, the MethodBoundaryAspect in PostSHARP allows you to run arbitrary code before, after, or instead of a method. However, without a better explanation of exactly what problem you are trying to solve, the best we can do is make guesses ... which won't get you very far.

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See edit of original topic please :). –  Aidiakapi Apr 23 '11 at 20:34
    
The example is there to show the result, but I explained the way I want to solve it clearly. I know how to do it with delegates, or instance overriding, but I now know its limitations, and can't do much about it. –  Aidiakapi Apr 24 '11 at 1:15
    
+1 for mentioning AOP! –  TrueWill May 10 '13 at 2:53
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As far as I know it's not possible to really exchange the body of a method. But depending on your settings you can solve it using delegates. Here some pseudo code to give you a direction:

public static Action<object> MethodToCall;

Then in the 0 case for example:

MethodToCall = (someParameter) => {
    MainFunction(someParameter);
    a(someParameter);
}

And then instead of MainFunction(null) you call:

MethodToCall(null)
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See edit of original topic please :). –  Aidiakapi Apr 23 '11 at 20:34
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If the static method is defined in a dynamic module or assembly, you can use System.Reflection.Emit.MethodRental.SwapMethodBody to do exactly what you are wanting to do, but it only works on methods from dynamic modules.

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Are you looking for Action ? (great headline)

public static Random rand = new Random();

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Action<string[]> action = null;
    switch (rand.Next(3))
    {
        case 0:
            action = a;
            break;
        case 1:
            action = b;
            break;
        case 2:
            action = c;
            break;
    }
    action(null);
}

(Also fixed Random for you, should re-use the instance instead of creating a new one very frequently, sequence won't be random otherwise)

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