Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to use methods with no return value such as random.shuffle in a list comprehension?

>>> import pprint
>>> import random
>>> 
>>> L = [ random.shuffle(range(5)) for x in range(5)]
>>> 
>>> print L
[None, None, None, None, None]

This is the for loop that applies the random.shuffle method to each item of my list:

>>> L = [ range(5) for x in range(5) ]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> for element in L:
...     random.shuffle(element)
... 
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[2, 0, 3, 1, 4],
 [2, 0, 1, 4, 3],
 [4, 1, 3, 0, 2],
 [1, 2, 4, 3, 0],
 [1, 3, 0, 2, 4]]

I can use map, which as a side effect shuffles the original list but returns a list of None

>>> L = [ range(5) for x in range(5) ]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> map(random.shuffle, L)
[None, None, None, None, None]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[3, 0, 4, 1, 2],
 [2, 3, 0, 1, 4],
 [2, 3, 1, 4, 0],
 [4, 2, 0, 3, 1],
 [1, 3, 0, 2, 4]]

as does using the list comprehension with shuffle:

>>> L = [ range(5) for x in range(5) ]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> L1 = [ random.shuffle(x) for x in L ]
>>> pprint.pprint(L1)
[None, None, None, None, None]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[1, 4, 0, 2, 3],
 [0, 4, 1, 3, 2],
 [2, 3, 4, 0, 1],
 [4, 1, 0, 2, 3],
 [2, 0, 4, 3, 1]]

Many questions and answers on stack overflow already point out that using map or a lc for the side effect is bad practice. I was wondering if there's any correct way to use a method with no return value in a list comprehension.

Is writing a method to wrap the non-returning method the only way:

>>> def shuffled(L):
...     ret_val = L[:]
...     random.shuffle(ret_val)
...     return ret_val
... 
>>> L = [ shuffled(range(5)) for x in range(5)]
>>> pprint.pprint(L)
[[2, 1, 0, 4, 3],
 [4, 0, 3, 1, 2],
 [4, 2, 3, 0, 1],
 [1, 0, 4, 2, 3],
 [2, 4, 3, 0, 1]]
>>> 
share|improve this question
    
I like your shuffled method, go with that in a list comprehension! –  sjr Apr 23 '11 at 20:50
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/5753597/… –  delnan Apr 23 '11 at 21:04
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No - list comprehensions are meant to be use with functions having return values. It's how their semantics are defined:

List comprehensions provide a concise way to create lists without resorting to use of map(), filter() and/or lambda. The resulting list definition tends often to be clearer than lists built using those constructs. Each list comprehension consists of an expression followed by a for clause, then zero or more for or if clauses. The result will be a list resulting from evaluating the expression in the context of the for and if clauses which follow it.

Having read this, it should be clear that "a list comprehension from a function having no return value" is an oxymoron.

Just use a for loop for something "one off":

import random
L = []
for x in range(5):
  l = range(5)
  random.shuffle(l)
  L.append(l)

Clean and simple. Your shuffled function is also just fine, and can be used in a list comprehension.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Eli is quite right. But I'd go for something more concise:

import random

L = [range(5) for each in xrange(5)]
for each in L:
    random.shuffle(each)

[edit]

OTOH you could use random.sample():

from random import sample

xr = xrange(5)
L = [sample(xr, 5) for each in xr]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks for the response and for pointing out sample. –  DTing Apr 24 '11 at 1:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.