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First off, I'm new to Rails, so my apologies if this question has an obvious answer - I've spent a few hours searching and haven't found one yet, but perhaps I just don't know how to phrase it for Google.

Here it is: I have an existing Rails (2.3.5) app with the usual HTML interface. I've been asked to take a subset of this app and make it available for use as an API. Where I'm stumbling is in trying to provide alternate model validation error messages. When a human user tries to register a new account and his username is too short the validation message should be "Please enter a valid username", for example, but when someone tries to register a new account via the API the same problem should trigger the message "USERNAME_TOO_SHORT".

Ideally I'd like to extend the validation framework so that I could do something like this in my user model:

validates_length_of       :user_name, :minimum => 6,
:message => 'Please enter a valid username',
:api_message => 'USERNAME_TOO_SHORT',

...and then choose to use the api_message in the view or controller for the API.

Other things I've considered include:

  • Add a "is_using_api" variable to my user model and build the error message appropriately based on the value of this variable. I really don't want to pollute the model this way, though.
  • Review the user.errors object in the view or controller and have a mapping that translates "Please enter a valid username" -> "USERNAME_TOO_SHORT" (for example). This is brittle and will break the minute a product manager asks for a change in the HTML error message.

Is there a better way to accomplish this in Rails than the one I've outlined above? If not, does anyone have any suggestions on if/how it might be possible to implement the path I've outlined?

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2 Answers 2

This can be accomplished by utilizing a "respond_to" block

respond_to do |format|
  format.html {
    ... the response for HTML (i.e. browser clients) ...
  }
  format.xml {
    ... the response for API clients
  }
  format.myformat {
    ... your custom format - you can literally name it anything you want
  }
end

It's designed to customize the response depending on what format people are using to request your information. Above is just one example, but typically if you're going to build an API, you won't be responding with HTML, since then the client may have to parse through a bunch of tags that would be irrelevant to them (e.g. tags, etc.).

And you don't have to use XML - you could use any format (JSON, XML, or even your own custom format).

Check your "routes.rb" file, and you'll see what I mean. Routes can contain a :format symbol, which is what tells the controller what format is being requested. That is how the controller knows which code block to execute.

Also, if you go here and do a text search for ":format" that my also help.

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I've seen respond_to blocks, but what I don't know is how to find out what validations failed when I'm inside the respond_to block. Checking user.errors for specific text strings is brittle (someone will change the message in the user model and not know to change the controller) and there's not necessarily a 1-to-1 mapping between the English and the API error messages. Is there a way to know which validations failed other than looking at error messages? –  user722111 Apr 23 '11 at 23:46
    
No, I don't think so. That's definitely what they're intended to do. If you maintain a test suite, and your test suite covers these cases then you will know at build time that your error messages have changed. This is one of the really awesome things about a good test suite - to catch the million-and-a-half things you can't keep track of. –  jefflunt Apr 24 '11 at 3:08
    
Also, as far as the model vs. controller area - all your validation errors should be generated by the model. One of the primary roles of the model in Rails is to protect the database from containing invalid objects. The model is the wrapper around the data model - so it's the proper place to put data validations. –  jefflunt Apr 24 '11 at 3:11
    
Test cases certainly help the brittleness issue, but not the lack of 1-to-1 mapping. If I see the error message "Please enter a valid username" I don't know whether to map that to "USERNAME_TOO_SHORT" or "USERNAME_TOO_LONG", for example. Looks like I'll have to pollute the model with info about the caller (API vs human) or come up with some new ideas. –  user722111 Apr 25 '11 at 18:31
    
Well, if the username is invalid, does it matter if it's too long or too short? If "Please enter a valid username" is good enough for the UI, is it not good enough for the API? Is the API response really the place to specify this, or is it better the API documentation? I guess it depends on what the spec & requirements are from the person requesting the work. I guess I don't understand why the complexity (the additional error code in the API vs. the UI) if there is no direct requirement for it from the person asking you to implement it. –  jefflunt Apr 25 '11 at 22:40

Following are the ways you have said:

  1. Ideally I'd like to extend the validation framework, add :api_message => 'USERNAME_TOO_SHORT', ...and then choose to use the api_message in the view or controller for the API.

  2. Add a "is_using_api" variable to my user model and build the error message appropriately based on the value of this variable. I really don't want to pollute the model this way, though.

  3. Review the user.errors object in the view or controller and have a mapping that translates "Please enter a valid username" -> "USERNAME_TOO_SHORT" (for example). This is brittle and will break the minute a product manager asks for a change in the HTML error message.

All of the above are not good enough or say, bad pratices for good software design.
I propose:

  1. Make a YAML file of all the errors that you want to change in your API, and store them in the proper hierarchy. This way, if there is any change, it wont damage the whole system, and the changes required would be minimal. You can call the apt error or warning message by simply calling it from the yml file(don't forget to require the file at the beginning).
  2. Go through this link and see if it helpslink
share|improve this answer
    
Your suggestion of a YAML file is a good one, but the core problem is this: How do I decide which error message is appropriate? If I decide in the model then it needs to know it's operating on data received via the API rather than the standard HTML interface. That is pollution I'd rather avoid. If I decide in the controller or the view then how do I know which validations failed? I can't check for an error string like "Please enter a valid username" because that string covers both usernames that are too short and ones that are too long, ie., there's no 1-to-1 mapping of English/API errors. –  user722111 Apr 23 '11 at 23:43

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