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I wrote the following code:

public class Point2
{
    private double _radius , _alpha;    

    public Point2 ( int x , int y )
    {
        //if one or more of the point values is <0 , the constructor will state a zero value.
        if (x < 0)  
        {
           x = 0;
        }

        if (y < 0)
        {
           y = 0;
        }
        _radius = Math.sqrt ( Math.pow(x,2) + Math.pow (y,2) ) ;
        _alpha = Math.toDegrees( Math.atan ((double)y/x) );
    }

    public Point2 (Point2 other) // copy constructor
    {
        this._radius = other._radius ;
        this._alpha = other._alpha ;
    }

    public int getX()
    {
       return (int) Math.round ( Math.sin(_alpha)*_radius );
    }

    public int getY()
    {
        return (int) Math.round ( Math.cos(_alpha)*_radius );   
    }

    public void setX (int x)
    {
        if (x >=0 )
        {
            _radius = Math.sqrt ( Math.pow (x,2) + Math.pow(getY(),2) );
            _alpha = Math.toDegree ( Math.atan ((double)getY()/x));
        } 
    }
}

The problem is that the compiler gives me an error on: _alpha = Math.toDegrees( Math.atan ((double)y/x) ); it says: "*cannot find symbol - method toDegree(double); maybe you meant: toDegrees(double)* "

What seems to be the problem ?

Thanks !

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Please think of better names for things. Underscores are not good for you. –  Dhaivat Pandya Apr 23 '11 at 21:21
    
The compiler gave you the most human readable advice. please read it. (someone else just deleted such a comment, but I think it's more than justified here) –  Peter Apr 23 '11 at 21:25
    
Consider using an IDE - the line would have been CLEARLY flagged. –  MJB Apr 23 '11 at 21:29
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

READ YOUR CODE!

    _radius = Math.sqrt ( Math.pow (x,2) + Math.pow(getY(),2) );
    _alpha = Math.toDegree ( Math.atan ((double)getY()/x));

That line says Math.toDegree instead of toDegrees!

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You beat me by seconds on it. –  peter_budo Apr 23 '11 at 21:22
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because you wanted to use toDegrees()

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I'd question the wisdom of setting negative x and y input values equal to zero. Talk about a nasty surprise for clients! Negative values make sense in most contexts. The fact that you have radius and theta as member variables suggest that these are points in the complex plane. Negative x and y values certainly do make sense.

I also agree with the recommendation to lose those awful underscores in your variable names. They're not necessary in this day and age, when IDEs can highlight member variables easily enough. You can prefix those with this. if you wish. Underscores are just an ugly artifact from C++ and emacs.

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Probably unrelated, but your code is going to blow chunks if x is less than or equals zero. You can't divide by zero.

Also, am I the only one that sees that his code already uses the plural? Seems the compiler is confused.

share|improve this answer
    
The compiler is not confused; the OP certainly is. It's plural in one spot, but singular in the other. Good eye on the angle. I'd recommend using atan2, because it'll know how to sort out whether the angle should be 90 degrees (y > 0) or 270 degrees (y < 0) in that case. –  duffymo Apr 23 '11 at 21:41
    
Oops! Thanks @duffymo! I didn't scroll down far enough. Doh! –  Richard Brightwell Apr 23 '11 at 22:31
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