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I am trying to make the following javascript timer perform two functions with a click of one button only - click once the timer starts; click again; it stops. click a third time it starts again, and so forth. What am I doing wrong in here? Thank you very much in advance.

    <html>
<head>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var c=0;
        var t;
        var timer_is_on=0;

        function timedCount()
        {
            document.getElementById('txt').value=c;
            c=c+1;
            t=setTimeout("timedCount()",1000);
        }

        function doTimer()
        {
            if (!timer_is_on)
            {
                timer_is_on=1;
                timedCount();
            }
        }

        function stopCount()
        {
            clearTimeout(t);
            timer_is_on=0;
        }
        function both(){
            doTimer();
            stopCount();
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body>
    <form>
        <input type="button" value="Start count!" onclick="doTimer" />
        <input type="text" id="txt" />
        <input type="button" value="Stop count!" onclick="stopCount()" />
    </form>
<p>
Click on the "Start count!" button above to start the timer. The input field will count forever, starting at 0. Click on the "Stop count!" button to stop the counting. Click on the "Start count!" button to start the timer again.
</p>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
You should format your code as code. Add four spaces before each code line. –  darkporter Apr 23 '11 at 21:25
    
I see two buttons in there. Where's the code that relates to your question? –  no.good.at.coding Apr 23 '11 at 21:26
    
@query: People have answered your question, Please take a minute and mark the one you think is the best answer for your question, regards –  JeyKeu May 13 '13 at 11:04

5 Answers 5

You don't describe an actual problem, so I'm not quite sure what to respond with, but here's a couple of potentially helpful notes.

The timedCount function is quasi-timed-recursive. This is cool if you're into continuation passing style, but it's not necessary, probably a little more confusing than it needs to be for JavaScript, and will waste some resources (stack frames) in languages that don't have tail-recursive stack cleanups (don't know if JS has that or not).

Since this is a repeating function execution, you could use setInterval instead of setTimeout, and have a single repeated function call that checks to see if it should increment and re-display the count... something like this:

var c=0;
var timer_is_on=false;

function displayCount() {
    document.getElementById('txt').value=c;
}

function count() {
    if(timer_is_on) {
        c=c+1;
        displayCount();
    }
}

var interval = setInterval(count,1000);

Now, to address the single-button part of the problem. Let's say there's a single button:

<input type="button" value="Start count!" onclick="toggle" />

When we click on it, we want that "value" attribute to change, and we want it to flip the timer_is_on variable. Let's create a function that does all these things:

function toggle() {
    if(timer_is_on) {
       timer_is_on = false;
       this.value = "Start count!";  // `toggle` is invoked by the button's event handler, so `this` is the button
    } else {
       timer_is_on = true;
       this.value = "Stop count!";
    }                   
}

So... count is always executing every 1000ms, but it only does anything if timer_is_on, and whether or not timer_is_on is true or false is controlled by toggle, which is attached to our button. Little bit simpler, I think.

UPDATE

What if we wanted to not have the function count always running in the background? As Tom Tu points out, this may represent a CPU overhead. I'm not certain it's a measurable one (or that it represents any overhead beyond the timer the browser is probably running to do its own UI updates), but it could be important on some platforms and so it's probably worth addressing.

While we're polishing, I don't much like attaching event handlers through tag attributes myself, or putting variables in the global/window scope if I can avoid it, so I'd probably wrap all our relevant counter setup/processing JavaScript inside one big setupCounter function, and also attach the toggle function to the onclick event of the input button using DOM selection and JavaScript. I'd probably try to only run the document.getElementById lookups once each, too.

So, let's say the button input has the id startstop but otherwise assume similar markup. I'd probably do something like this:

function setupCounter() { 
    var c=0,
        interval,
        counter_display = document.getElementById('txt'),
        button = document.getElementById('startstop');

    function display_count() {
        counter_display.value = c;
    }

    function count() {
        c=c+1;
        display_count();
    }

    function toggle() {
       if(!interval)
          interval = setInterval(count,1000);
          button.value = "Stop count!";
       else {
          clearInterval(interval);
          interval = false;
          button.value = "Start count!";
       }
    }

    button.onclick = toggle;
}

Then you'd call setupCounter either sometime in the document after both the counter_display and startstop elements have been declared, or assign it to the window.onload event or pass it to something like jQuery's $(document).ready().

share|improve this answer

Try this

<form name="f1">
<input type="text" id="but" />
<input type="button" value="start" onclick="timer()" />
<input type="button" value="stop" onclick="stoptimer()" />
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">
var count=0;
var x;
function timer(){
x=setTimeout("timer()",1000);
count=count+1;
document.getElementById("but").value=count;
}

function stoptimer(){
clearTimeout(x);
}

</script>
share|improve this answer

you forgot the brackets after doTimer:

<input type="button" value="Start count!" onclick="doTimer" />
share|improve this answer

Try this code:

var c=0;
var t;
var timer_is_on= false;

function timedCount() {
    document.getElementById('txt').value=c;
    c++;
    if (timer_is_on) {
        t= setTimeout(timedCount,1000);
    }
}

function doTimer() {
    if (!timer_is_on) {
        timer_is_on=true;
        timedCount();
    }
    else {
        clearTimeout(t);
        timer_is_on=false;
    }
}

Attach the doTimer() fn to each of your buttons.

Example: http://jsbin.com/onoge4/3

Changes I made: use true/false instead of 1/0.

share|improve this answer
  1. The JavaScript
    Note the use of true and false instead of 1 and 0.

    var timer_is_on=false;
    //..
    function doTimer()
    {
        if (!timer_is_on)
        {
            timer_is_on=true;
            timedCount();
        }
        else
        {
            timer_is_on=false;
            stopCount();
        }
    }
    
  2. The HTML
    I see your button is already set to call doTimer() onclick (however, note that you're missing the parentheses):

    <input type="button" value="Start count!" onclick="doTimer()" />
    
  3. Changing the text of the button
    First, assign an id to the button:

    <input type="button" id="toggleTimer" value="Start count!" onclick="doTimer()" />
    

    Next, modify the JS:

    function doTimer()
    {
        if (!timer_is_on)
        {
            timer_is_on=true;
            document.getElementById("toggleTimer").value="Stop count!";
            timedCount();
        }
        else
        {
            timer_is_on=false;
            document.getElementById("toggleTimer").value="Start count!";
            stopCount();
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer

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