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I have an array of integers, which I'm using the .push() method to add to.

Is there a simple way to remove a specific element from an array? The equivalent of something like array.remove(int);

I have to use good ol' fashioned JavaScript - no frameworks allowed.

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4  
If you need to support <IE9 (sigh) then check this SO question regarding indexOf in IE. –  Scotty.NET Sep 13 '13 at 7:48
12  
underscore.js without works in both modern and legacy browsers. –  zhon Sep 19 '13 at 13:32
18  
OP specifically states no frameworks –  Jonathon Sep 25 '13 at 9:52
18  
@Jonathon, my answer is for those (like me) who ended up on this page looking for a production solution, not specifically for Walker. _.without([1, 2, 1, 0, 3, 1, 4], 0, 1); // => [2, 3, 4] –  zhon Sep 27 '13 at 20:42
1  
you can call it "old fashioned" but not "good" :-P –  Sebastián Grignoli Jun 12 at 18:39
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27 Answers 27

up vote 1367 down vote accepted

First, find the index of the element you want to remove:

var array = [2, 5, 9];
var index = array.indexOf(5);

Note: browser support for indexOf is limited, it is not supported in IE7-8.

Then remove it with splice:

if (index > -1) {
    array.splice(index, 1);
}

The second parameter of splice is the number of elements to remove. Note, splice modifies the array in place and returns a new array containing the elements that have been removed.

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56  
Good solution, but some browsers don't suppoer array.indexOf –  Peter Olson Apr 23 '11 at 22:25
31  
The second argument to the splice function is how many elements to remove. –  Tom Wadley Apr 23 '11 at 22:25
18  
array.indexOf is not supported in IE8 or earlier (see w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_indexof_array.asp). jQuery.inArray() works similarly though (api.jquery.com/jQuery.inArray) –  Jon May 17 '13 at 17:15
91  
This answer is wrong and/or incomplete. It only works for the first instance of an item in an array, and ONLY if it's IE9+. I find the vote count here to be tragic. –  Ben Lesh Aug 10 '13 at 19:28
48  
@blesh This is the same behavior as IList.Remove in C# and ArrayList.remove in Java. There are two ways to interpret the problem, but the OP asked for an item, not all instances of an item. –  Brian Nickel Aug 30 '13 at 20:29
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I don't know how you are expecting array.remove(int) to behave. There are three possibilities I can think of that you might be wanting.

To remove an element of an array at an index i:

array.splice(i, 1);

If you want to remove every element with value number from the array:

for(var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if(array[i] === number) {
       array.splice(i, 1);
    }
}

If you just want to make the element at index i no longer exist, but you don't want the indexes of the other elements to change:

delete array[i];
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49  
delete is not the correct way to remove an element from an array! –  Felix Kling Jan 27 '13 at 15:30
10  
@FelixKling It depends, it works if you want to make it so that array.hasOwnProperty(i) returns false and have the element at that position return undefined. But I'll admit that that's not a very common thing to want to do. –  Peter Olson Jan 27 '13 at 15:36
13  
delete will not update the length of the array neither really erases the element, only replaces it with the special value undefined. –  diosney Feb 17 '13 at 3:44
3  
@diosney I don't know what you mean when you say it doesn't really erase the element. Further, it does more than simply replacing the value at that index with undefined: it removes both the index and the value from the array, i.e. after delete array[0], "0" in array will return false. –  Peter Olson Apr 15 '13 at 19:13
3  
for(var i=array.length; i>=0; i--) should be for(var i=array.length-1; i>=0; i--) because indexing starts at 0 (there is no element at array[array.length]) –  Bambax May 23 '13 at 18:04
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Depends on whether you want to keep an empty spot or not.

If you do want an empty slot, delete is fine:

delete array[ index ];

If you don't, you should use the splice method:

array.splice( index, 1 );

And if you need the value of that item, you can just store the returned array's element:

var value = array.splice( index, 1 )[0];

In case you want to do it in some order, you can use array.pop() for the last one or array.shift() for the first one (and both return the value of the item too).

And if you don't know the index of the item, you can use array.indexOf( item ) to get it (in a if() to get one item or in a while() to get all of them). array.indexOf( item ) returns either the index or -1 if not found. 

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14  
It's worth noting that var value will not store the removed value but an array containing the removed value. –  Jakub Jul 10 '13 at 9:55
    
delete is not the correct way to remove an element from an array!! –  Progo Jul 4 at 14:20
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A friend was having issues in IE8, and showed me what he did, I told him it was wrong, and he told me he got the answer here. The current top answer will not work in all browsers (IE8 for example), and will only remove the first occurrence of the item.

Remove ALL instances from an array

ALL browsers (just use this)

  function remove(arr, item) {
      for(var i = arr.length; i--;) {
          if(arr[i] === item) {
              arr.splice(i, 1);
          }
      }
  }

It loops through the array backwards (since indices and length will change as items are removed) and removes the item if it's found. Works in all browsers.

IE9+, Chrome, Safari and Firefox ONLY

function remove(arr, item) {
   var i;
   while((i = arr.indexOf(item)) !== -1) {
     arr.splice(i, 1);
   }
}
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Shouldn't it be var i = arr.length - 1;? –  sroes Jan 29 at 7:54
2  
@sroes it should not be because the loop starts at i = arr.length -1 or i-- making it same as the max index. arr.length is just an initial value for i. i-- will always be truthy (and reducing by 1 at each loop op) until it equals 0 (a falsy value) and the loop will then stop. –  gabeno Jan 29 at 20:06
    
Oh, now I see. The lack of a third statement threw me off. –  sroes Jan 29 at 20:35
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Array.prototype.remByVal = function(val) {
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (this[i] === val) {
            this.splice(i, 1);
            i--;
        }
    }
    return this;
}
//Call like
[1, 2, 3, 4].remByVal(3);
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6  
I'm not a big fan of this approach. If you end up using different libraries or frameworks, they can end up conflicting with each other. –  Charlie Kilian Apr 23 '11 at 22:30
    
This worked as well, I chose to go with the indexOf function in the end though. Thanks for the help! –  Walker Apr 23 '11 at 22:35
3  
Bad idea, see this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/948358/array-prototype-problem –  MMeah Jul 9 '12 at 22:10
    
+1 to MMeah. Now we will have a problem when using: for (var i in arr) { .... } –  Amber de Black May 14 at 12:28
2  
If you're doing a for in on an array, you already have a problem. –  Zirak May 14 at 13:01
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Be careful when you use delete for an array. It is good for deleting attributes of objects but not so good for arrays. It is better to use splice for arrays.

Keep in mind that when you use delete for an array you could get wrong results for anArray.length. In other words, delete would remove the element but not update the value of length property.

You can also expect to have holes in index numbers after using delete, e.g. you could end up with having indexes 1,3,4,8,9,11 and length as it was before using delete.

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Option #1

Browsers: Internet Explorer 9+, Firefox 4+, Chrome 5+, Safari 5+, and Opera 12+

To extend the Array prototype by using "Object.defineProperty" function.

This approach will not cause problems with enumeration, because we marked "enumerable" as "false".

Be sure that your browser supports "Object.defineProperty" function. Here is the compatibility table:

http://kangax.github.io/es5-compat-table/#Object.defineProperty

Extension code:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "remove", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function (item) {
        var removeCounter = 0;

        for (var index = 0; index < this.length; index++) {
            if (this[index] === item) {
                this.splice(index, 1);
                removeCounter++;
                index--;
            }
        }
        return removeCounter;
    }
});

Usage code #1:

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 2];

var itemsRemoved = arr.remove(2);

console.log(itemsRemoved);
// 4

console.log(arr);
// [1, 3]

Usage code #2:

var arr = ["tree", "bird", "car", "bird", "bird"];

var itemsRemoved = arr.remove("bird");

console.log(itemsRemoved);
// 3

console.log(arr);
// ["tree", "car"]


Option #2 for old browsers

If you want to use this function without "Object.defineProperty", you can define it as a global scope function.

Extension code:

function removeArrayItem(arr, item) {
    var removeCounter = 0;

    for (var index = 0; index < arr.length; index++) {
        if (arr[index] === item) {
            arr.splice(index, 1);
            removeCounter++;
            index--;
        }
    }
    return removeCounter;
}

Usage code:

var arr = ["tree", "bird", "car", "bird", "bird"];

var itemsRemoved = removeArrayItem(arr, "bird");

console.log(itemsRemoved);
// 3

console.log(arr);
// ["tree", "car"]


Option #3 for high performance

This code uses a "filter" function and it works about 50 times faster than previous options, but this approach creates new array.

Extension code:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "filterValue", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function (itemToRemove) {
        var filteredArray = this.filter(function(item){
            return item !== itemToRemove;
        });
        return filteredArray;
    }
});

Usage code:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "filterValue", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function (itemToRemove) {
        var filteredArray = this.filter(function(item){
            return item !== itemToRemove;
        });
        return filteredArray;
    }
});

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 2];

// PAY ATTENTION.
// Original array stay unchanged.
var filteredArr = arr.filterValue(2);

console.log(filteredArr);
// [1, 3]
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You can always delete the specific element and filter out the array. It might need an extension of the array object for browsers that don't implement the filter method but in the long term its easier since all you do is this:

var my_array = [1,2,3,4,5,6];
delete my_array[4];
console.log(my_array.filter(function(a){return typeof a !== 'undefined';}));

Should display [1, 2, 3, 4, 6]

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John Resig posted a good implementation:

// Array Remove - By John Resig (MIT Licensed)
Array.prototype.remove = function(from, to) {
  var rest = this.slice((to || from) + 1 || this.length);
  this.length = from < 0 ? this.length + from : from;
  return this.push.apply(this, rest);
};

But the main reason I am posting this is to warn users against the alternative implementation suggested in the comments on that page (Dec 14, 2007):

Array.prototype.remove = function(from, to){
  this.splice(from, (to=[0,from||1,++to-from][arguments.length])<0?this.length+to:to);
  return this.length;
};

It seems to work well at first, but through a painful process I discovered it fails when trying to remove the second to last element in an array. For example, if you have a 10-element array and you try to remove the 9th element with this:

myArray.remove(8);

You end up with an 8-element array. Don't know why but I confirmed John's original implementation doesn't have this problem.

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You can do it easily with filter method:

function remove(arrOriginal, elementToRemove){
    return arrOriginal.filter(function(el){return el !== elementToRemove});
}
console.log( remove([1, 2, 1, 0, 3, 1, 4], 1) );

This removes all elements from the array and also works faster then combination of slice and indexOf

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Nice solution but I see one problem and that is it creates new array and doesn't do anything to original array. –  Mak Feb 22 at 23:14
    
@Mak you are correct. This indeed creates another array. But if you do not want to do this you can overwrite old one with a new one. –  Salvador Dali Feb 22 at 23:17
    
Also note, Array.prototype.filter is ECMAScript 5.1 (No IE8) –  Montana Harkin May 23 at 20:35
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Check out this code. It works in every major browser.

remove_item = function (arr, value) {
    var b = '';
    for (b in arr) {
        if (arr[b] === value) {
            arr.splice(b, 1);
            break;
        }
    }
    return arr;
}

Call this function

remove_item(array,value);
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This code looks like it is 15 years old. It modifies the global variable b. The function doesn't have a name, but it should. It uses the == comparison operator although === is more predictable. –  Roland Illig May 23 at 16:56
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Underscore.js can be used to solve issues with multiple browsers. It uses in-build browser methods if present. If they are absent like in the case of older IE it uses its own custom methods.

Simple example to remove elements from array (from the website) -

_.without([1, 2, 1, 0, 3, 1, 4], 0, 1); // => [2, 3, 4]
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This gist here will solve your problem, and also deletes all occurrences of the argument instead of just 1 (or a specified value).

Array.prototype.destroy = function(obj){
    // Return null if no objects were found and removed
    var destroyed = null;

    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++){

        // Use while-loop to find adjacent equal objects
        while(this[i] === obj){

            // Remove this[i] and store it within destroyed
            destroyed = this.splice(i, 1)[0];
        }
    }

    return destroyed;
}

Usage:

var x = [1, 2, 3, 3, true, false, undefined, false];

x.destroy(3);         // => 3
x.destroy(false);     // => false
x;                    // => [1, 2, true, undefined]

x.destroy(true);      // => true
x.destroy(undefined); // => undefined
x;                    // => [1, 2]

x.destroy(3);         // => null
x;                    // => [1, 2]
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1  
This is buggy on unsorted lists. [1,2,3,3,2,1].destroy(1) results in [3,3,2,1] plnkr.co/edit/p8QhmOfgl9AzlBWjLLTp?p=preview –  Walter Stabosz May 2 '13 at 20:45
    
@WalterStabosz Thanks for pointing that out! I’ve updated both the Gist and the example to fix the bug. It’s unfortunately no longer a one-liner, but I eliminated the dependencies of indexOf and Array#count. –  zykadelic May 13 '13 at 13:00
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Why has nobody suggested the obvious one that doesn't need indexOf or splice?

function(arr, val) {
  for (var i = 0, j = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i++) {
    if (arr[i] !== val) {
      arr[j++] = arr[i];
    }
  }
  arr.length = j;
}

It also performs much better in comparison with the splice implementation in every test I did.

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I know there are a lot of answers already, but many of them seem to over complicate the problem. Here is a simple, recursive way of removing all instances of a key - calls self until index isn't found. Yes, it only works in browsers with indexOf, but it's simple and can be easily polyfilled.

Stand-alone function

function removeAll(array, key){
    var index = array.indexOf(key);

    if(index === -1) return;

    array.splice(index, 1);
    removeAll(array,key);
}

Prototype method

Array.prototype.removeAll = function(key){
    var index = this.indexOf(key);

    if(index === -1) return;

    this.splice(index, 1);
    this.removeAll(key);
}
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I also ran in the situation where I had to remove an element from Array. .indexOf was not working in IE* so sharing my working jQuery.inArray() solution.

var index = jQuery.inArray(val,arr);
if (index > -1) {
    arr.splice(index, 1);
    //console.log(arr);
}
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I know too old to reply, but I want to add my functions that take a predicate instead of a value.

Definition

var ArrayHelper = {
    remove: function(array, predict) {
        for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            if (predict(array[i]) && i > -1) {
                return array.splice(i, 1);
            }
        }
    },
    removeAll: function(array, predict) {
        var removed = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            if (predict(array[i]) && i > -1) {
                removed.push(array.splice(i, 1));
            }
        }

        return removed;
    }
};

Usage

ArrayHelper.remove(myArray, function(row) { return row.id === 5 });
ArrayHelper.removeAll(myArray, function(row) { return row.id > 3 && row.id < 15});

Hope this helps

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In CoffeeScript:

my_array.splice(idx, 1) **for** *ele*, *idx* **in** my_array **when** *ele* **is** this_value
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You can iterate over each array-item and splice it if it exist in your array.

function destroy(arr, val) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) if (arr[i] === val) arr.splice(i, 1);
    return arr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
destroy( [1,2,3,3,3,4,5], 3 ) returns [1,2,3,4,5]]. i should not be incremented when the array is spliced. –  Renze de Waal Jan 23 at 17:34
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Create new array:

var my_array = new Array();

Add elements to this array:

my_array.push("element1");

The function indexOf (Returns index or -1 when not found) :

var indexOf = function(needle) 
{
    if(typeof Array.prototype.indexOf === 'function') // newer browsers
    {
        indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf;
    } 
    else // older browsers
    {
        indexOf = function(needle) 
        {
            var index = -1;

            for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) 
            {
                if(this[i] === needle) 
                {
                    index = i;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return index;
        };
    }

    return indexOf.call(this, needle);
};

Check index of this element (tested with firefox and IE8+):

var index = indexOf.call(my_array, "element1");

Remove 1 element located at index from the array

my_array.splice(index, 1);
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You can do a backward loop to make sure not to screw up the indexes, if there are multiple instances of the element.

var myElement = "chocolate";
var myArray = ['chocolate', 'poptart', 'poptart', 'poptart', 'chocolate', 'poptart', 'poptart', 'chocolate'];

/* Important code */
for (var i = myArray.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if (myArray[i] == myElement) myArray.splice(i, 1);
}

Live Demo

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  Array.prototype.removeItem = function(a) {
            for (i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
                if (this[i] == a) {
                    for (i2 = i; i2 < this.length - 1; i2++) {
                        this[i2] = this[i2 + 1];
                    }
                    this.length = this.length - 1
                    return;
                }
            }
        }

    var recentMovies = ['Iron Man', 'Batman', 'Superman', 'Spiderman'];
    recentMovies.removeItem('Superman');
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Based on all the answers which were mainly correct and taking into account the best practices suggested (especially not using Array.prototype directly), I came up with the below code. Let me know if there is anything you find wierd. But should be fine:

// Extending the core Array Object
MyArray.prototype = new Array();
MyArray.prototype.constructor= MyArray;

/**
 * New array class constructor
 */
function MyArray() {
    // Constructor code here
}

 /**
  * Excludes a value from array and returns the rest of array 
  * @param  {string/number/boolean} excludedValue Value   which should be removed
  * @return {array}               
  */
 MyArray.prototype.without = function(excludedValue) { 

    var valueType = typeof excludedValue;

    if (this.length < 1)
        return [];

    if (valueType == 'object' || valueType == 'array' || valueType == 'undefined')
        throw "Argument can not be object, array or undefined";

    for (var index in this) {

            if (this[index] === excludedValue) {

                this.splice(index, 1);
                index--;

            }   
    }; 

    return this;
};

// How to use
var arr = new MyArray();
arr = [1,2,3,4,5,"name", false];

arr.without(1); // will change the array to [2,3,4,5,"name", false]
arr.without("name"); // will change the array to [2,3,4,5, false]
arr.without(false); // will change the array to [2,3,4,5]
arr.without([1,2]); // will throw error as argument can not be array
arr.without({bar: "foo"}); // will throw error as argument can not be object
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I'm pretty new to JavaScript and needed this functionality. I merely wrote this:

function removeFromArray(array, item)
{
    while((index = array.indexOf(item)) > -1)
        array.splice(index,1);
}

Then when I want to use it:

//Set-up some dummy data
var dummyObj = {name:"meow"};
var dummyArray = [dummyObj, "item1", "item1", "item2"];

//Remove the dummy data
removeFromArray(dummyArray, dummyObj);
removeFromArray(dummyArray, "item2");

Output - As expected. ["item1", "item1"]

You may have different needs than I, so you can easily modify it to suit them. I hope this helps someone.

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I like this version of splice, removing an element by its value using $.inArray:

$(document).ready(function(){
    var arr = ["C#","Ruby","PHP","C","C++"];
    var itemtoRemove = "PHP";
    arr.splice($.inArray(itemtoRemove, arr),1);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Removes last item if searched item not found –  Antonimo Apr 30 at 17:05
1  
yes correct, you should know which element you want to remove like in the other examples. –  mboeckle May 1 at 17:00
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var index,
    input = [1,2,3],
    indexToRemove = 1;
    integers = [];

for (index in input) {
    if (input.hasOwnProperty(index)) {
        if (index !== indexToRemove) {
            integers.push(result); 
        }
    }
}
input = integers;

This solution will take an array of input and will search through the input for the value to remove. This will loop through the entire input array and the result will be a second array integers that has had the specific index removed. The integers array is then copied back into the input array.

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The easiest way:

array.splice( array.indexOf(item), 1 );
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