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My project is to implement a simple shell program with background processing by way of ending an arglist with &, as in most UNIX shells. My problem is how to debug the shell in GDB when background processing requires child processes to be created.

My child processing code goes like

int id;
int child=-1;
int running=0;

if ((strcmp(args[0], "&")==0){

  if ((id==fork())==-1)
    perror("Couldn't start the background process");

  else if (id==0){  //start the child process
    running++;
    printf("Job %d started, PID: %d\n", running, getpid());
    signal(SIGINT, SIG_DFL);
    signal(SIGQUIT, SIG_DFL);
    execvp(args[0], args);
    perror("Can't execute command);
    exit(1);

  else {
    int jobNum= running-(running-1);

   if ( (waitpid(-1, &child, WNOHANG) == -1)
     perror("Child Wait");

   else 
     printf("[%d] exited with status %d\n", jobNum, child>>8);
}

When I try to run a command, like ps &, and set the breakpoint to the function parser, the command executes without hitting the breakpoint. This is confusing and renders the debugger useless in this instance. What can I do about it?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want

set follow-fork-mode child

also note that the line

if ((id==fork())==-1)

is comparing an uninitialized value against the return value of fork(). I believe you wanted an assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
The second was my error, but what do you mean by the first? –  Jason Apr 24 '11 at 1:38
    
@jason the gdb command 'set follow-fork-mode' tells gdb what to do when it encounters a fork, which side of the fork it should continue debugging, the parent side, or the child side. –  matt Apr 24 '11 at 1:42
    
Thanks for the clarification. –  Jason Apr 24 '11 at 1:43

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