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I'm wondering is it ever possible to write locking-features(for threading) with the language itself (this question is purely academic, I know no one will ever do it even if its possible (not me))?

Rephrasing the question:

A) In Java, is it possible to write thread safety functions with java alone, but without using any of the provided classes/language elements/syntax which offer this feature?

B) In C#, is it possible to write thread safety functions with C# alone, but without using any of the provided classes/language elements/syntax which offer this feature?

C) In Vb, is it possible to write thread safety functions with Vb alone, but without using any of the provided classes/language elements/syntax which offer this feature?

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Re-rephrasing the question: Is it possible to write thread-safe code with [Java|.Net] alone, without using any built-in threading primitives? –  SLaks Apr 24 '11 at 2:10
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What exactly do you mean by thread safety functions? What about the Thread class? –  SLaks Apr 24 '11 at 2:11
    
And indeed, what do you mean by 'native implementations'? If it's a language feature (enumerated below by Christo), then a compliant VM must support it –  Phil Lello Apr 24 '11 at 2:30
    
@SLaks yes the thread class is a "provided class which offer threading features" –  Pacerier Apr 24 '11 at 3:26
    
@Phil Lello native implementations means things designed to do threading/locking like the SyncLock/synchronized –  Pacerier Apr 24 '11 at 3:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you have atomic reads and writes, which C# does for ints for example, you can use Dekker's algorithm to build thread-safe algorithms without support from any other primitives:

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Good reference to Dekker's algorithm, Rick, it shows the problem of having to busy wait without OS support with something like lock(). –  Christo Apr 24 '11 at 2:25
    
regarding "This algorithm won't work on SMP machines equipped with these CPUs without the use of memory barriers." is that only observed on C++ or is that also observed in java and C#? Btw am i right to say that if we have a SMP machine equipped with CPUs without the use of memory barriers, it will be unable to do a perfect synchronized/SyncLock/lock() as well? –  Pacerier Apr 24 '11 at 3:56
    
No, all languages are subject to the memory barrier problem. In some cases volatile solves the problem. But for academic purposes (like your question) you could permit the use of Thread.MemoryBarrier() in your problem statement to account for modern CPUs since this is just a CPU instruction. –  Rick Sladkey Apr 24 '11 at 4:12

Yes it is possible, all one really needs to form a mutex is a shared memory variable that is written in a single read-modify-write machine cycle. However, it is inefficient because all the threads in potential conflict have to busy-wait. A major point of the more advanced constructs in the thread contention avoidance classes in these languages is to allow a thread to quit executing until another thread is done with the conflicted resource and then be immediately put back into the execution train when the resource frees up.

I think maybe you are thinking about:

C# lock()
VB SyncLock
Java syncronized

Those are language elements, not library classes.

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Although lock() in C# is part of the language, it is simply syntactic sugar that is defined by the specification to expand into System.Threading.Monitor.Enter etc., which is a library feature. The language itself doesn't support locking. –  Rick Sladkey Apr 24 '11 at 2:53
    
<answer retracted, you can do it in Java by relying on static variables> –  sjr Apr 24 '11 at 3:32
    
but how do we make a shared memory variable that is written in a single read-modify-write machine cycle if even something like if(locked){}else{} cannot be relied on? –  Pacerier Apr 24 '11 at 3:33
    
@sjr sry i meant we can use the volatile keyword, but not the synchronized or classes specifically designed to do locking like Mutex classes etc –  Pacerier Apr 24 '11 at 3:33
    
@Rick: I certainly agree with you all mechanisms like lock() and "syntactic sugar" that get mapped to something else. Going further, System.Threading.Monitor.Enter is just "managed code sugar" on top of the underlying Windows OS API's. That is the whole point is that all these languages offer native language syntax that allows ties back to the OS threading support. lock() still works on Mono! –  Christo Apr 24 '11 at 3:56

No. If you have a thread safe program, you must be using some of the provided classes/language elements/syntax which offer thread safety.

The semantics of volatile in Java is defined in Java Language Spec Section 17, "Threads and Locks"

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