Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to have several overloaded, global to_string() functions that take some type T and convert it to its string representation. For the general case, I want to be able to write:

template<typename T,class OutputStringType> inline
typename enable_if<!std::is_pointer<T>::value
                && has_insertion_operator<T>::value,
                   void>::type
to_string( T const &t, OutputStringType *out ) {
  std::ostringstream o;
  o << t;
  *out = o.str();
}

My implementation of has_insertion_operator so far is:

struct sfinae_base {
  typedef char yes[1];
  typedef char no[2];
};

template<typename T>
struct has_insertion_operator : sfinae_base {
  template<typename U> static yes& test( U& );
  template<typename U> static no& test(...);

  static std::ostream &s;
  static T const &t;

  static bool const value = sizeof( test( s << t ) ) == sizeof( yes ); // line 48
};

(It borrows from this and this.) That seems to work. But now I want to have an overloaded version of to_string for types that do not have operator<< but do have their own to_string() member function, i.e.:

template<class T,class OutputStringType> inline
typename enable_if<!has_insertion_operator<T>::value
                && has_to_string<T,std::string (T::*)() const>::value,
                   void>::type
to_string( T const &t, OutputStringType *out ) {
  *out = t.to_string();
}

The implementation of has_to_string is:

#define DECL_HAS_MEM_FN(FN_NAME)                                      \
  template<typename T,typename S>                                     \
  struct has_##FN_NAME : sfinae_base {                                \
    template<typename SignatureType,SignatureType> struct type_check; \
    template<class U> static yes& test(type_check<S,&U::FN_NAME>*);   \
    template<class U> static no& test(...);                           \
    static bool const value = sizeof( test<T>(0) ) == sizeof( yes );  \
  }

DECL_HAS_MEM_FN( to_string );

(This part seems to work fine. It's adapted from this.) However, when I have:

struct S {
  string to_string() const {
    return "42";
  }
};

int main() {
  string buf;
  S s;
  to_string( s, &buf ); // line 104
}

I get:

foo.cpp: In instantiation of ‘const bool has_insertion_operator<S>::value’:
foo.cpp:104:   instantiated from here
foo.cpp:48: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘has_insertion_operator<S>::s << has_insertion_operator<S>::t’

It seems like SFINAE is not happening. How do I write has_insertion_operator correctly such that it determines whether a global operator<< is available?

FYI: I'm using g++ 4.2.1 (that which ships as part of Xcode on Mac OS X). Also, I'd like the code to be only standard C++03 without 3rd-party libraries, e.g., Boost.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
It's all certainly doable, but why? –  Potatoswatter Apr 24 '11 at 3:49
1  
@Potatoswatter: the why isn't important. Please assume that for the rest of my project that I know what I'm doing. If you must know, it's part of framework for passing parameters of any type to form part of a localized error message. The details of all that are unnecessary for this question. If you know how to do it, please answer the question. It would be much appreciated. –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 24 '11 at 3:53
2  
Why is always important. –  GManNickG Apr 24 '11 at 6:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I should have simply been more faithful to this answer. A working implementation is:

namespace has_insertion_operator_impl {
  typedef char no;
  typedef char yes[2];

  struct any_t {
    template<typename T> any_t( T const& );
  };

  no operator<<( std::ostream const&, any_t const& );

  yes& test( std::ostream& );
  no test( no );

  template<typename T>
  struct has_insertion_operator {
    static std::ostream &s;
    static T const &t;
    static bool const value = sizeof( test(s << t) ) == sizeof( yes );
  };
}

template<typename T>
struct has_insertion_operator :
  has_insertion_operator_impl::has_insertion_operator<T> {
};

I believe that it does not actually rely on SFINAE.

share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful: Does it work in C++03 compilers? –  Viktor Sehr Mar 23 '13 at 9:58
    
Try it and find out. –  Paul J. Lucas Mar 23 '13 at 15:58
    
thanks for the code anyway :) –  Viktor Sehr Apr 17 '13 at 15:17
    
I agree, it doesn't actually SFINAE. It just leverages overload resolution + the contract that operator<< should return it's first argument (for stream insertions). This points at one weak point: you'd need a more generic trait, e.g. is_basic_stream_insertable<Char, CharTraits> to allow for different types of standard streams :/ +1 –  sehe Sep 4 '13 at 7:44

The initializer of value on line 48 is not in a context where SFINAE works. Try moving the expression to the function declaration.

#include <iostream>

struct sfinae_base {
  typedef char yes[1];
  typedef char no[2];
};

template<typename T>
struct has_insertion_operator : sfinae_base {

  // this may quietly fail:
  template<typename U> static yes& test(
      size_t (*n)[ sizeof( std::cout << * static_cast<U*>(0) ) ] );

  // "..." provides fallback in case above fails
  template<typename U> static no& test(...);

  static bool const value = sizeof( test<T>( NULL ) ) == sizeof( yes );
};

However, I have to question the amount of sophistication that is going into this. I see non-orthogonal mechanisms that will grind against each other (to_string vs. operator<<) and I hear poor assumptions getting tossed around (for example that operator<< is global vs a member, although the code as implemented looks OK in that regard).

share|improve this answer
1  
It doesn't compile with several errors. The first error is: there are no arguments to ‘test’ that depend on a template parameter, so a declaration of ‘test’ must be available. –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 24 '11 at 4:16
    
BTW: operator<< must be global if it's to be an insertion operator since the first argument must be an ostream&. –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 24 '11 at 4:18
    
BTW#2: ostream::ostream() is protected. –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 24 '11 at 4:22
    
@Paul: Patched up. The adage about "teach a man to fish" comes to mind… if you can't debug these things, solving it once won't really help you. I've made it work with GCC 4.5.1 (ideone.com/Kk8rk) but you're on your own backporting it to 4.2.1. –  Potatoswatter Apr 24 '11 at 4:25
2  
Had I simply fixed it myself, then anybody else who read your answer would have read an answer that simply doesn't work. Do you really want to leave your non-working answers as-is? –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 24 '11 at 4:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.