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Possible Duplicates:
pass by reference or pass by value?
Pass by Reference / Value in C++

Im having trouble with the pass-by-value-result method. i understand pass by reference and pass by value but im not quite clear on pass-by-value result. How similar is it to pass by value(assuming it is similar)?

here is the code

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

void swap(int a, int b)
{

  int temp;
    temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

int main()
{
  int value = 2;
  int  list[5] = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};


  swap(value, list[0]);

  cout << value << "   " << list[0] << endl;

  swap(list[0], list[1]);

  cout << list[0] << "   " << list[1] << endl;

  swap(value, list[value]);

  cout << value << "   " << list[value] << endl;

}

now the objective is to find out what is the value of "value" and "list" are if you use pass by value result. (NOT pass by value).

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by karlphillip, Jeff, Michael Petrotta, Bo Persson, dreamlax Apr 24 '11 at 5:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Looking at your code, the calls to swap() have no external effect. Their parameters are passed by value. I think that "pass by value result" in this case is badly written version of "What is the result if swap() uses pass by value?". I could be tempted to think that "pass by value result" means "function result passed by value" (i.e. not returning a reference or pointer), but that makes no sense here since swap() does not return anything. – Mike DeSimone Apr 24 '11 at 5:23
    
@Mike Okay, well sometimes pass-by-value-result is referred to pass-by-copy. if that helps – dougle Apr 24 '11 at 5:30
    
Still not seeing the difference between that and pass-by-value. – Mike DeSimone Apr 24 '11 at 5:33
    
I'm assuming "subprogram" is just another word for "function" here. "... and then copied back at subprogram termination." Wait, what? C++ has a mechanism to do that? The only thing I know that gets explicitly copied back at function termination is the return value, and the optimizer is allowed to get rid of that copy. – Mike DeSimone Apr 24 '11 at 5:46
    
@Willy: Pass-by-value-result is not a thing. There are 3 ways to pass objects in C++. Pass-by-value, pass-by-reference, and pass-by-const-reference. – Benjamin Lindley Apr 24 '11 at 5:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're passing by value then you're copying the variable over in the method. Which means any changed made to that variable don't happen to the original variable. This means your output would be as follows:

2   1
1   3
2   5

If you were passing by reference, which is passing the address of your variable (instead of making a copy) then your output would be different and would reflect the calculations made in swap(int a, int b). Have you ran this to check the results?

EDIT After doing some research I found a few things. C++ Does not support Pass-by-value-result, however it can be simulated. To do so you create a copy of the variables, pass them by reference to your function, and then set your original values to the temporary values. See code below..

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

void swap(int &a, int &b)
{

  int temp;
    temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

int main()
{
  int value = 2;
  int  list[5] = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};


  int temp1 = value;
  int temp2 = list[0]

  swap(temp1, temp2);

  value = temp1;
  list[0] = temp2;

  cout << value << "   " << list[0] << endl;

  temp1 = list[0];
  temp2 = list[1];

  swap(list[0], list[1]);

  list[0] = temp1;
  list[1] = temp2;

  cout << list[0] << "   " << list[1] << endl;

  temp1 = value;
  temp2 = list[value];

  swap(value, list[value]);

  value = temp1;
  list[value] = temp2;
  cout << value << "   " << list[value] << endl;

}

This will give you the results of:

1   2
3   2
2   1

This type of passing is also called Copy-In, Copy-Out. Fortran use to use it. But that is all I found during my searches. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Im sorry this is confusing but yes i have ran these results and got these answers for pass-by-value. But what im talking about is Pass-by-value-result which is different than pass-by-value. – dougle Apr 24 '11 at 5:26
    
Thanks man i really appreciate the help. – dougle Apr 24 '11 at 5:47
    
If it's copy-in, copy-out shouldn't you be copying the values to temp variables, making the call to swap, and the reassigning the target values after the swap call? The first call looks right but if I understand correctly you want to pass in temp1 and temp2 to swap every time. – Andy Gaskell Apr 14 at 7:43

Use references as your parameters instead such as:

void swap(int &a, int &b)
{

  int temp;
    temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

a and b will now hold the actual value.

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