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I am programming in linux, which is new to me. I am working on a project to design a 'layer 7' network protocol, and we have these packets that contain resources. And depending on the type of resource, the length of that resource would be different. I am kind of new to C/C++, and am not sure I understand unions all that well. The idea was that I would be able to make a "generic resource" type and depending on what resource it was I could just cast a void* as a pointer to this typedef structure and then call the data contained in it as anything I please and it would take care of the 'casting'. Anyways, here is what I came up with:

typedef struct _pktresource
{
    unsigned char Type; // The type of the resource.

    union {
        struct { // This is used for variable length data.
            unsigned short Size;
            void *Data;
        };

        void *ResourceData; // Just a generic pointer to the data.
        unsigned char Byte;
        char SByte;
        short Int16;
        unsigned short UInt16;
        int Int32;
        unsigned int UInt32;
        long long Int64;
        unsigned long long UInt64;
        float Float;
        double Double;
        unsigned int Time;
    };
} pktresource, *ppktresource;

The principal behind this was simple. But when I do something like

pktresource.Size = XXXX

It starts out 4 bytes into the structure instead of 1 byte. Am I failing to grasp a major concept here? Because it feels like I am.

EDIT: Forgot to mention, when I reference

pktresource.Type

It starts at the beginning like its supposed to.

EDIT: Correction was to add pragma statements for proper alignment. After fix, the code looks like:

#pragma pack(push)
#pragma pack(1)

typedef struct _pktresource
{
    unsigned char Type; // The type of the resource.

    union {
        struct { // This is used for variable length data.
            unsigned short Size;
            unsigned char Data[];
        };

        unsigned char ResourceData[]; // Just a generic pointer to the data.
        unsigned char Byte;
        char SByte;
        short Int16;
        unsigned short UInt16;
        int Int32;
        unsigned int UInt32;
        long long Int64;
        unsigned long long UInt64;
        float Float;
        double Double;
        unsigned int Time;
    };
} pktresource, *ppktresource;

#pragma pack(pop)
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3  
"I am programming in linux, which is new to me.", " I am kind of new to C/C++, " - and you're writing a network protocol???? –  Mitch Wheat Apr 24 '11 at 5:04
    
I am not new to networking or programming or linux itself. I have been programming on windows in one language or another for about 13 years now. Do you know the answer to my question, or did you just say that for no real reason? –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:05
    
" I have been programming on windows in one language or another for about 13 years now" - and yet you are new to C/C++. Which languages were you using? –  Mitch Wheat Apr 24 '11 at 5:07
    
vb(5/6)/vb.net, python, php, c#, (and c/c++ for last year). As you could guess, I don't know C# that well. Also forgot to mention BASIC and QBASIC (but thats pretty old). PHP is also new for me. –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:08
    
Also, what does being new to an OS and a specific programming language have anything to do with designing a networking protocol? Oh and I forgot to mention ASM (NASM syntax my fav). –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:14
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Am I failing to grasp a major concept here?

You're missing knowledge of structure alignment. Basically, it forces certain fields to be aligned by > 1 byte boundaries depending on their size. You can use #pragma to override this behavior, but that can cause interoperability issues if the structure is used anywhere outside your application.

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oh man, haha I have heard the term "structure alignment" before, but didn't know what it was. The structure will only be used inside the application for parsing network data, nothing else. –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:11
    
Then you shouldn't have a problem. What's happening is your void *Data member (being a pointer type) is four bytes in length, and thusly aligned on a four-byte boundary. Because it's the largest union member, the entire union will be that size and aligned on that boundary. That's why it starts at byte 5 instead of byte 2. –  Adam Maras Apr 24 '11 at 5:14
    
Using the #pragma can slow things down, as memory retrievals will have to deal with data split over word boundaries. Unless space is a consideration, I don't think I'd mess with the compiler's default layout. (You could also move Type to the bottom of the struct!) –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 24 '11 at 5:19
    
Thanks, so I should use #pragma pack(1) ? –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:22
    
Thanks a lot!-- –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:39
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I think the problem is alignment. By default most compilers align to the word size of the machine / OS, in this case 32 bits / 4 bytes. So, since you have that unsigned char Type field up front, the compiler is pushing the Size field to the next even 4 byte boundary.

try

#pragma pack 1

ahead of you structure definitions.

I don't know what compiler you are using, but that's good old-fashioned C code that's been regularly in use for network programming since before most of these rude kids on StackOverflow were born.

share|improve this answer
    
I use gcc 4.4.3 –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:28
    
I understand after reading the wiki article, thank a lot, I would 1-up you but I don't have enough rep I guess. –  Eric Johnson Apr 24 '11 at 5:29
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